[Lady Eastlake, art historian, on the 'abominably bad english spoken by most women & especially by young ladies at the present time'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Eliz Eastlake') to 'Miss Parish', giving examples of female 'slip slop'.

Author: 
Elizabeth, Lady Eastlake (1809-1893, born Elizabeth Rigby), author, art critic and art historian, wife of Sir Charles Eastlake (1793-1865), artist and Director of the National Gallery, London
Publication details: 
'7 F. Sqre' [i.e. 7 Fitzroy Square, London] 8 February 1889.
£95.00
SKU: 21014

4pp., 16mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. The letter begins: 'A press of necessary writ[in]g has retarded my acknowledgmt. of yr kind letter, & of the Copy of “Work & Leisure”.' She assures Parish 'most sincerely' that she thinks her 'little paper excellent - & that the true tribute to my dear, never-forgotten [?] goes both to my heart & to my judgment'. She is sure Parish's “Companion in travelling” will be entirely to the point'. She does not 'abound in suggestions for subjects. The abominably bad english spoken by most women & especially by young ladies at the present time calls aloud for exposure. My ears are continually offended by “I am going to” “I am trying to” “I have to” &c – as well as by the reiteration of what I think, but am not sure, is called a “pleonasm” - such as “another one” - Aslo with no end of the nominative case instead of the accusative - & vice versa - “between you & I” “you & him had better go” &c'. She continues regarding the 'just mentioned “going to” &c', before concluding: 'Whether this can serve as a [?] for you I can't tell – But the bad habit ought to be exposed. Cultivated men never talk such slip slop'.