BARBOUR

[Professor James Oswald Dykes, Scottish clergyman and educator.] Autograph Letter Signed ('J. Oswald Dykes'), responding in charming style to the request for an autograph of 'Master W. A. Wilson' (later Rev. William Andrew Wilson of Coleraine).

Author: 
James Oswald Dykes (1835-1912), Scottish clergyman and educator, Barbour Professor of Divinity of the Theological College of the Presbyterian Church of England (now Westminster College in Cambridge)
Publication details: 
49 Gordon Square, London W6; 16 October 1896.
£45.00

1p, 12mo. In fair condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. A charming reply to a request for an autograph: 'My dear Boy, | Your letter is so friendly and what you ask is so easily granted that I should be churlish indeed, if I did not send you my best wishes and subscribe myself, though unknown, your friend | J. Oswald Dykes'. From the papers of Rev. William Andrew Wilson (1869-1918), Minister of New Row Presbyterian Church, Coleraine, and his son the poet R. N. D. Wilson [Robert Noble Denison Wilson] (1899-1953).

[ Sir John David Rees denounces 'the Anglo vernacular press', 'women lawyers', 'Miss Cornelia Sorabji, & Rukmi Bhai' and 'Reviving Hinduism'. ] Corrected draft of newspaper article showing a marked antipathy to the Indian population.

Author: 
Sir John David Rees (1854-1922), colonial administrator and author [ Lord Lansdowne;Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne ]
Publication details: 
Written in India during Lord Lansdowne's viceroyship and Lord Rosebery's premiership, hence 1894.
£150.00

For information on Rees see his obituary in The Times, 3 June 1922. 2pp., foolscap 8vo. On the rectos of a bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged, with the second leaf tipped in onto a leaf extracted from an album. From Rees's papers, and written during Lord Lansdowne's viceroyship, 1888-1894, and Lord Rosebery's premiership, 1894-1895; hence in 1894. An extract from the corrected draft of an untraced newspaper or magazine article, showing marked antipathy to the native Indian population, their rights and aspirations.

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