APOTHECARIES

[Elizabeth Garrett Anderson writes after becoming the first British woman licensed to practice medicine.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Elizabeth Garrett') to unnamed man, with reference to 'the medical circular's report of my Exam[inatio]n.'

Author: 
Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836-1917), physician and suffragist [Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon (1827-1891); Apothecaries Hall, London]
Publication details: 
5 Blandford Square [London]. 31 March [no year, on paper watermarked 1865], circa 1866.
£1,000.00

3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. Last page (on verso of first leaf), including signature, written lengthwise. In good condition, lightly aged, with strip of paper stub from mount still adhering. Signed 'Elizabeth Garrett', as it was not until 1871 that she married J. G. S. Anderson. The letter reads: 'Dear Sir | I have to thank you much for sending me the volume of Jury Reports. I have already read part of it with much interest & I shall enjoy going through it during this vacation leisure. I only sent you the medical circular's report of my Examn. at the Hall.

Collection of nineteen manuscript and printed documents, including accounts, relating to the Liverpool Apothecaries Company, and to the resignation of John Abraham, head of its Dispensing Department from 1838 to 1843.

Author: 
John Abraham (1813-1881), head of the Dispensing Department of the Liverpool Apothecaries Company, 1838-1845, and latterly of Clay & Abraham, pharmaceutical chemists
Liverpool Apothecaries Company
Publication details: 
Liverpool and London, between 1838 and 1843.
£800.00
Liverpool Apothecaries Company

The Liverpool Apothecaries Company was founded in 1836 with a capital of £100,000, its premises comprising a warehouse, chemical and pharmaceutical laboratories, and a retail shop in Seel Street. John Abraham ran the dispensing department from 1838 until his resignation in 1843, going on in 1845 to found, as junior partner, the pharmaceutical chemists Clay & Abraham.

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