[ Margot Asquith to her husband Liberal Prime Minister H. H. Asquith. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Yr. own | Margot'), to 'Darling', discussing personal matters including her love for her baby and a portrait of 'R' by John Singer Sargent.

Author: 
Margot Asquith [ Emma Alice Margaret Asquith, Countess of Oxford and Asquith, née Tennant ] (1864-1945), wife of Liberal Prime Minister H. H. Asquith [ Herbert Henry Asquith ] (1852-1928)
Publication details: 
On letterhead of St Salvator's, St Andrews, N.B. [ Scotland ]. 'Sunday 6th. [around 1900?]'
£120.00
SKU: 20490

4pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. The letter, the handwriting of which is not altogether straightforward, begins: 'Darling It is so cold here we have to have fires wh. is a blow for the children for having no gov[erness]. I thought we sd. Live on the beach for tea & everything whereas the wind obliges one to wear Xmas clothes you are well out of it'. She continues: 'Jack King & their babies are here I mind no Visitors who are busy & they always are. Their infants are sweet. My baby [presumably her first child Elizabeth, born in 1897] is too darling now for words so healthy & strong & full of love & vigour & mischief she & I ride on a very mousy pony 1d. A turn & she is deliriously happy “I are [last word underlined] naughty & I must be naughty mother” “Oh! No darling[”] “but I wants [last word underlined] to be”! - with a look of enterprise in her sweet eyes wh. is Killing'. She is sending 'a capital letter from Mary Curzon quite good isn't it'. She complains: 'When I've read the papers written my letters played round & been on the sands with the child I seem to have very little time for reading! I go to bed 10.30 if not before & I'm playing piano daily polishing old Schumann & learning a Valse to cheer up the child'. References to 'Sybil Westmoreland' and 'R.' follow. The latter 'goes out of his way to give one to what he calls women of good reputation & the prudes etc & is often on the defensive poor darling'. There are also references to 'what R & C have done', 'Smith' ('agreeable & painstaking but stupid I think') and 'Eddy & Pam'. She reports that 'Sargent', i.e. the portraitist John Singer Sargent, is 'going to do R full length in a top hat[,] I sd. prefer him to be forced into a less journal amusant frame of mind (Sargent I mean not R) however it may turn out all right'. She ends by asking him how his 'right fingers' are, adding: 'I long to be near you darling | Yr. own | Margot'. In a postscript she states that she will send the Mary Curzon letter by the next post. From a small archoive of Asquith correspondence.