[ Samuel Carter Hall, editor of the Arts Monthly, while literary secretary to Ugo Foscolo. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('S Carter Hall') to Thomas Crofton Croker, regarding the whereabouts of his books, with reference to John Noblett and 'Mr. Ebbs'.

Author: 
Samuel Carter Hall (1800-1889), Irish-born journalist and editor of the Art Monthly [ Ugo Foscolo (1778-1827), Italian poet and revolutionary; Thomas Crofton Croker (1798-1854; John Noblett ]
Publication details: 
Cappa Cottage, South Bank [ St John's Wood, London ]. 15 September 1822.
£50.00
SKU: 20600

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In fair lightly aged and worn, with slight damage to second leaf caused by the breaking open of the wafer, and slight wear at the foot. Addressed on reverse of second leaf to 'T. C. Croker Esqre 31 Bedford Street | Covent Garden'. 2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with slight damage to second leaf caused by the breaking open of the wafer, and wear at the foot. Addressed on reverse of second leaf to 'T. C. Croker Esqre 31 Bedford Street | Covent Garden'. See the entries on Hall, Croker and Foscolo in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The subject of the letter, John Noblett, may be the Cork artist who did work for Croker, but the dates would appear to be wrong. Having gone into exile on the defeat of Napoleon, Foscolo arrived in London in September 1816, 'famous but penniless'. The young Hall set out for London from Cork in 1822, and 'immediately fell into the right company: the author Eyre Evans Crowe introduced him to Ugo Foscolo, the exiled Italian poet, and young Hall was engaged as the latter's secretary'. Cappa Cottage was one of a group of three St John's Wood cottages on which Foscolo took out a short lease: the other two were Digamma Cottage, in which Foscolo lived, and Green Cottage. Cappa and Digamma were rented out by Foscolo to other Italian exiles; and Hall evidently worked for the poet in Cappa as well. (See Vincent, 'Ugo Foscolo in Regency England'. The present letter begins with Hall explaining to Croker that he is writing as he has not been able to find him at home. Hall 'received a letter from John Hoblett in which he mentions to me having left your books with Mr Ebbs whom he lodged with, - I calld [sic] on Mr Ebbs and he informed the [sic] that he left them himself within a fortnight after Hobletts departure at Mr Nicholson's'. He trusts that Croker has since received his books. He continues: 'I think it necessary to observe that John Noblett speaks of you in his letter in the highest terms, and says that his “respect for you is greater than he can express[”]'. Noblett 'blames himself exceedingly for his neglect, but for nothing else'. He hopes that this will satisfy Croker that he 'had formed a premature opinion of him, and wipe away any unfavourable opinion you may have formed of him'. In a postscript he asks Croker to convey an enclosure to Nicholson.