ENVIRONMENTALIST

[John Muir, environmental pioneer etc] Autograph Letter Signed John Muir, to David Douglas, Publisher/Editor of Scott's Letters and Journal, responding to his receipt of Walter Scott's Journal and discussing enthusastically his visit to the UK.

Author: 
John Muir [(1838 – 1914), influential Scottish-American naturalist, author, environmental philosopher, botanist, zoologist, glaciologist, and early advocate for the preservation of wilderness
Muir page 4
Publication details: 
Martinez, California, 31 Dec. 1893.
£2,250.00
Muir page 4

Four pages, 8vo, bifolium, remnants of tipping into David Douglas's gift of Sir Walter Scott's Journal published in 1890, edited by the publisher, Douglas. Edges stained, some marking, text clear and complete, as follows: My dear Mr Douglas, | I got home safely, & have been very busy with ranch affairs & old notebooks trying to get something ready for publication [perhaps The Mountains of California published in 1894]. Looking back over my summers wanderings I see that to you above all others do I owe thanks for guidance & kindness.

Small archive of fourteen Typed Letters Signed and six Autograph Letters Signed (all 'Lawrence Chubb'), all addressed to Sir Henry Trueman Wood, Secretary, Royal Society of Arts.

Author: 
Sir Lawrence Wensley Chubb (1873-1948), pioneer Anglo-Australian environmental campaigner, first Secretary of the National Trust
Publication details: 
Between 4 June 1913 and 19 January 1917; three on letterhead of the Coal Smoke Abatement Society, the others on letterhead of the Commons & Footpaths Preservation Society.
£250.00

The collection is in good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. The fourteen typed letters are all 4to, 1 p; the autograph letters are all 12mo, three of them of two pages and three of one page. Largely concerned with a lecture given by Chubb to the R.S.A. in 1916 on 'the Preservation of Footpaths & Rights of Way', for which Chubb requests '1,000 or 1,250 cards of admission'. The subject, Chubb comments (21 July 1915), 'seems in itself sufficiently important and interesting to warrant special treatment, and in lecturing I mostly keep footpaths & commons quite separate.

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