CHRISTISON

[Sir Robert Christison, eminent toxicologist and physician.] Autograph Letter Signed ('R. Christison') to R. Herbert Story, regarding attending an address at Edinburgh Univesity by Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton.

Author: 
Sir Robert Christison (1797-1882), Scottish toxicologist and physician; President of Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh [Robert Herbert Story (1835-1907), Principal, University of Glasgow]
Publication details: 
40 Moray Place [Edinburgh]; 9 January 1854.
£350.00

1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged, with thin strip of paper from mount adhering to reverse. Folded twice. With Christison's expansive signature, and written while Story – future Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glasgow – was studying at the University of Edinburgh. If he is not 'prevented by professional occupations, which are apt to be rather pressing at this season', it will give him great pleasure 'to attend on the occasion of the delivering of the address of Sir E. B. Lytton to the Associated Societies of the University on the evening of Wednesday the 18th.

On a Process for preparing economically the Muriate of Morphia. [...] With a Letter from Dr. Christison on its employment in medicine.

Author: 
William Gregory [morphine; opium; Edinburgh, Scotland; Sir Robert Christison]
Gregory,On a Process for preparing ... the Muriate of Morphia, Pamphlet
Publication details: 
'From the Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, No. 107.' [Edinburgh:] D. & W. Millar, Printers.
£25.00
Gregory,On a Process for preparing ... the Muriate of Morphia, Pamphlet

8vo, 8 pp.Stitched and disbound. Text clear and complete. Fair, on aged paper, with slight loss from margins of first leaf. Final paragraph sums up the paper: 'Expressing these data in simpler terms, it appears that for twenty shillings the apothecary should receive 295 doses of Battley's solution, 1700 doses of laudanum, and 1840 of muriate of morphia. The muriate of morphia is at once, then, cheaper and more efficacious than any of the preparations of opium now in general use.'

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