SLAVES

[Katharine Villiers, Countess of Clarendon.] Four letters to the London merchant bankers Thomson Hankey & Co., all relating to the Mesopotamia Estate sugar plantation in Jamaica, two signed by both the Earl and the Countess.

Author: 
Katharine Villiers, Countess of Clarendon [née Grimston and previously Foster-Barham] (1810-1874), wife of George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon (1800-1870) [Messrs. Thomson Hankey & Co., bankers]
Publication details: 
Two letters from the Vice Regal Lodge, Dublin in 1851, one of them signed by the Earl and the Countess. The other two letters from London, 1845 and 1849.
£180.00

The Countess of Clarendon had inherited the Mesopotamia Estate from her previous husband John Foster Barham (1799-1838), who had died a certified lunatic year before her marriage to the Earl. The Estate had been in the hands of the Barham family for more than a century. The four items in good condition, on lightly-aged paper. All four with notes by the recipients. ONE: Letter signed by George J. Nicholson of the London soliticitors Vizard & Leman, in secretarial hand, to Messrs Thomson Hankey & Co. Lincolns Inn Fields; 7 July 1845 ('Mesopotamia Estate'). 1p., 4to.

[Alexander Johnstone, proprietor of Westerhall [Baccaye] slave Plantation, Grenada, West Indies.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Alexr. Johnstone') to his London bankers Messrs Simond & Hankey, regarding the 'neglect & misconduct' of 'Capn. Mackintosh'.

Author: 
Alexander Johnstone (1727-1783), proprietor of the Westerhall [Baccaye] slave Plantation, Grenada, West Indies [Messrs Simond & Hankey, London bankers]
Publication details: 
Bulstrode Street [London]. 4 October 1777.
£280.00

The story of the Johnstone family has been told in Emma Rothschild's 'Inner Life of Empires' (Princeton, 2012). According to Rothschild, Alexander Johnstone 'became a soldier in the British army and was sent to North America.

[Mrs Isabella Hankey, widow of West Indian merchant banker John Peter Hankey.] Signed manuscript 'Bond of Indemnity | Mrs. Hankey to Executors and Trustees of John Peter Hankey Esqr. deceased', referring to 'Sugar Plantations' and 'Negroes Slaves'.

Author: 
Mrs Isabella Hankey, widow of John Peter Hankey (d.1807) of Grenada, West Indian merchant banker [Messrs Thomson Hankey & Co., London bankers; Sir William Alexander]
Publication details: 
[London, England.] 21 July 1814.
£220.00

3pp., folio. Bifolium. In good condition, on lightly aged and worn paper. Signed 'Isabella Hankey' and witnessed by 'John fforster Carey Street'.

[Manuscripts] Partnership agreements, 1825-1929

Author: 
Thomson Hankey & Co. of 7 Mincing Lane, City of London, ('West India and General Merchants Bankers and Agents')
Publication details: 
1825-1929
£1,500.00

Fifteen partnership agreements (indentures, memoranda, articles of copartnership) relating to the London banking firm of Thomson Hankey & Co., dating from between 1825 and 1929.Having traded with Jamaica, Antigua and the Leeward Islands in partnership with John Houblon. Captain Samuel Hankey commenced in business as a City of London banker-goldsmith in 1685. The firm prospered to such an extent that his son Henry owned Jonathan's Coffee House in Exchange Alley, the precursor of the London Stock Exchange, and was knighted in 1732.

[Printed] Déclaration de l'empereur, concernant l'Emploi des Biens des Couvens supprimés des Trinitaires, & les Confréries établies aux Pays-Bas pour la redemption des Captifs

Author: 
[Trinitarian Order]
Déclaration de l'empereur, concernant l'Emploi des Biens des Couvens supprimés
Publication details: 
[2 Juillet 1783] Namur, chez G.J. Lafontaine, Imprimeur patenté de Sa Majesté l'Empereur & Roi, 1783.
£95.00
Déclaration de l'empereur, concernant l'Emploi des Biens des Couvens supprimés

Disbound, four pages, folio, aged but good, paginated [1]-4, but also numbered in MS. 95-98. The Trinitarian Order was created in France in the C12th to raise funds to ransom crusader and other Christians held by barbarians. This edict from Emperor Joseph II of Austria orders the suppression of this order and the confiscation of its property since the Order's original purpose was no longer valid.

Syndicate content