BORDERS

[An eighteenth-century doctor in the Scottish Borders. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('<J?> Abernethy') to 'Mr. Hood', with suggestions for the treatment of his 'Ague', and reference to Lady Mackerston.

Author: 
Dr Abernethy of Kelso, eighteenth-century Scottish doctor
Publication details: 
Kelso. 19 June 1724.
£100.00

1p., 8vo. In fair condition, on lightly-aged paper, despite slight singeing to extremities. He is sorry to hear of the recipient's 'uneasienes', and that he is unable to attend on him, as he is 'oblidged to goe sie the Lady Mackerston's daughter in the afternoon'. If he can, he will wait on him on the following morning, as he suspects there may be 'a tendency to your Ague'.

[Mrs M. A. Cranstoun of Friars Haugh.] Autograph Letter Signed to Charles Erskine of Erskine & Curle, Writers, Melrose, regarding a dispute with neighbour Mr Usher regarding right of way and 'the taking of Gravel'.

Author: 
[Mrs M. A. Cranstoun of Friars Haugh, Borders, Scotland; Charles Erskine of Erskine & Curle, Writers [solicitors], Melrose]
Publication details: 
Friars Haugh [Borders, Scotland]; 9 May 1821.
£40.00

2pp., 4to. Bifolium. Addressed, with red wax seal, on reverse of second leaf, to 'Charles Erskine Esqre. | Melrose'. Docketted: '7 May 1821 | Mrs Cranstown [sic] | About Mr Usher preventing the taking of Gravel'. A well-written letter, and a nice piece of social history. She lays out her case extremely clearly: 'I trouble you with this letter on the following account. Having occasion for some Gravel to beautify our Court, I employed a man to bring it from the river on Friday last. Mr Usher objected to his doing so, the man answered, "have not they a right?

Autograph letter signed to Miss Russell.

Author: 
John Marriott.:
Publication details: 
10 June (no year).
£100.00

Divine and poet (1780-1825). Three pages, 4to, heavily water-stained but still all legible, tear and nick not affecting text. He tells her that he has at last got round to sending her a book (a postcript reveals that it was a "french Book" which his wife had promised ot loan a long time before). He had hoped she was going to visit. He discusses the parlous health of his son and his wife's "maternal anxiety". He had seen a mutual acquaintance, looking better, and hopes she received his letter of thanks for the drawings of the tesselated pavement she had given as a present to him,.

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