[ Bessie MacArthur, Scottish poet. ] Fourteen letters and three cards, all in autograph, to Brian Lambie of the Biggar Museum, with one typed poem in Scots ('Folk'), one holograph poem ('"Bits and Pieces"'), and three other autograph items.

Bessie J. B. MacArthur [ Bessie Jane Bird MacArthur, née Bisset ] (1889-1983), poet and dramatist of the Scottish Renaissance [ Brian Lambie (1930-2014) of the Biggar Museum, Lanark ]
Publication details: 
Thirteen letters and one card from 4 Glencairn Crescent, Edinburgh 12 (the first with the address on a letterhead); the other letter without place. Thirteen of the letters written between 13 July 1975 and 6 January 1978. The other items undated.

MacArthur's work features and is discussed by Byrne and McMillan in 'Modern Scottish Women Poets' (2003). Lambie is the subject of a long obituary in The Scotsman, 21 January 2015. Twenty-two items. The collection is in good condition, with light signs of age and wear. The following description is divided into six parts. ONE: 14 Autograph Letters Signed and 3 Autograph Cards Signed to Lambie. The 17 items of correspondence are variously signed 'Bessie MacArthur' (7), 'Bessie J. B. MacArthur' (6), 'B. J. N. McA.' (4). The letters total 32pp., in various formats.

Autograph Manuscript Signed, an untitled holograph poem by the Scottish writer and artist James Ballantine, beginning 'Confide ye aye in Providence, for Providence is Kind'.

James Ballantine (c.1807-1877), Scottish writer and artist in stained glass
Publication details: 
Edinburgh; 16 August 1856.

1p., landscape 8vo. On the first leaf of a bifolium. Very good, on lightly-aged paper. Well presented, with the second blank leaf neatly inserted into a windowpane border. The poem is sixteen lines long, arranged in four stanzas, neatly written out on a piece of wove paper. The first stanza reads 'Confide ye aye in Providence, for Providence is Kind | And bear ye a' lifes changes, wi a calm an' tranquil mind | Though pressed an' hemmed on every side, hae faith, an' ye'll win through | For ilka blade o grass keeps its ain drap o dew'.

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