LUCKHURST

[ Sir Richard Vynne Southwell, British mathematician. ] Eleven Signed Letters (all 'Richard V. Southwell'), six in Autograph and five Typed, to the Secretary, Royal Society of Arts [ K W Luckhurst ]

Author: 
Sir Richard Vynne Southwell (1888-1970), British mathematician in the applied mechanics field of engineering science
Publication details: 
Nine on letterheads of The Old House, Trumpington, Cambridge. Between 1 July 1952 and 16 January 1954.
£150.00

Totalling 13pp. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with a few staple holes to corners. In the first letter (1 July 1952) he reluctantly declines an invitation to be the Society's Trueman Wood Lecturer, despite considering that the 'subject proposed has great importance at the present time': 'I am pledged to visit Iraq in November on an educational mission organized by the British Council; and since this year I shall also be going to Istanbul and Belfast, perhaps it is as well that I should not have any other preoccupation to divert me from the book that I am trying to finish!'.

Typed Note Signed ('Oliver Simon') to the Secretary, Royal Society of Arts, London.

Author: 
Oliver Simon (Oliver Joseph Simon, 1895-1956), printer and typographer [The Curwen Press]
Publication details: 
25 February 1952; on letterhead of The Curwen Press Ltd, Plaistow, London, E.13.
£22.00

8vo, 1 p. Good, on aged paper, with staple holes to top left-hand corner. Docketed in blue ink. He thanks the Secretary for his 'invitation for me to take the Chair on Wednesday, 23 April, which I am most happy to accept'.

Autograph Letter Signed to [K. W. Luckhurst], Secretary, Royal Society of Arts, together with unsigned carbon of reply.

Author: 
Thomas Girtin
Publication details: 
The letter, 17 July 1951, on letterhead 'PELHAM MOUNT | PELHAMS WALK | ESHER'; the carbon, 13 July 1951.
£45.00

British metallurgist (1874-1960) and Master of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers. Apologises for assuming that Dr Thomas Monro was a member of the Society. 'I never doubted it because not only did he live in Adelphi Terrace, next door to his friend David Garrick, but he was friendly with so many of the Members of that day, and a great patron of the Arts. For the rest he was a medical man - chief physician to 'Bedlam' and one of poor old George III's mental doctors -'.

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