THOMAS

[Thomas Griffiths Wainewright, murderer, artist, essayist and dandy.] Autograph Letter Signed ('T. G Wainewright') to the wife of 'Mr. P.' [probably Ann Procter, wife of poet Bryan Waller Procter], in florid style, calling himself a 'verbal pauper'.

Author: 
Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1847), murderer, artist, art critic and aesthete [Bryan Waller Procter ('Barry Cornwall'), poet, and his wife, nee Anne Skepper]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. Paper watermarked 1824, and written [probably at Turnham Green] about the same time.
£650.00

Only a handful of letters (or less) by the artist, aesthete and murderer Thomas Griffiths Wainewright survive (None yet traced!). He holds the dubious distinction of being the first English murderer to employ strychnine; with his wife's help he first murdered her half-sister and then his uncle. Artist, essayist, connoisseur and dandy, friend of Charles Lamb and patron of William Blake, Wainewright is a fascinating and elusive figure who inspired Oscar Wilde, whose study of Wainewright, the essay 'Pen, Pencil and Poison', first appeared in 1889, cribbed from the introduction to W.

[War with China 1886; Lord Wolseley, as Adjutant-General, enquires and Sir Thomas Wade expounds his views.] Autograph Letter Signed from Wolseley asking for Wade's views on line of conduct to be adopted, and Wade's 27pp of 'observations' in reply.

Author: 
Sir Thomas Wade [Sir Thomas Francis Wade] (1818-1895), diplomat and sinologist; Sir Garnet Wolseley [Field Marshal Garnet Joseph Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley] (1833-1913), British Army officer
Publication details: 
Wolseley's letter: 2 February 1886. On letterhead of the War Office [Whitehall, London]. Wade's 'observations': 27 April 1886. On letterheads of the Athenaeum Club, Pall Mall, S.W. [London].
£1,600.00

See the entries for Wolseley and Wade in the Oxford DNB. Two interesting items, dating from a period of increased tension between Britain and China over what the learned and well-informed Wade calls - in his long unpublished document - 'the Burmese frontier question'. Having defeated King Mindon of Upper Burma in the two-week Third Anglo-Burmese War of November 1885, the British had set about incorporating the new colony of Upper Burma into the Burma Province. This would be done on 26 February 1886, a little more than three weeks after the writing of Wolseley's letter.

[James Kenney, Irish dramatist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Jas Kenney.') to book-collector and bon-vivant Thomas Hill, playfully explaining that he has no portrait to offer ('I am now pluming my Crest for the first Painter that comes across me').

Author: 
James Kenney (1780-1849), Irish dramatist [Thomas Hill (1760-1840), book-collector and bon-vivant]
Publication details: 
9 Southampton Buildings [London]. 15 December 1806.
£220.00

For information on Kenney and the recipient Thomas Hill, see their entries in the Oxford DNB. 1p, 4to. Bifiolium. In good condition, lightly aged and worn. Addressed, with postmark, on reverse of second leaf, to 'Thos. Hill Esqr | Queen Hith' [i.e. Queenhithe, London]. Hill had presumably requested a representation of Kenney, and the tone of the letter is that of one man of the world addressing another, accurately caught by a dramatist: 'Dear Sir, | I have just received your note of the 10th.

[James Kenney, Irish dramatist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Jas Kenney.') to 'Loo Loo' ('Mademoiselle Holcroft'), i.e. wife Louisa, discussing their home situation, education of children, theatrical affairs, personal news.

Author: 
James Kenney (1780-1849), Irish dramatist [Thomas Holcroft (1745-1809), author and radical]
Publication details: 
Versailles. 15 June 1822.
£350.00

3pp, 4to. Bifolium. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn. Addressed, with Versailles postmark, on reverse of second leaf, 'A Mademoiselle Holcroft | Chateau de Pinon | près | Chavignon | Dep. de l'Aisne'. The background to the letter requires some explanation. In 1812 a prosperous Kenney had married Louisa Mercier (c.1780-1853), daughter of the French dramatist Louis-Sébastien Mercier (1740-1814), and fourth wife and widow of the playwright Thomas Holcroft, a leading radical who had assisted his friend Thomas Paine publish 'The Rights of Man'.

[Thomas Brassey, civil engineer who transformed the world's railways.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Thomas Brassey'), asking [Charles Manby] to 'obtain permission to erect a Window to Joseph Locke in Westminster Abbey', like that to Robert Stephenson.

Author: 
Thomas Brassey (1805-1870), civil engineer associated with railway projects [Joseph Locke (1805-1859) and Charles Manby (1804-1884), civil engineers; Westminster Abbey; Robert Stephenson]
Publication details: 
27 June 1862. 56 Lowndes Square [London].
£50.00

See the entries for Brassey and Locke in Oxford DNB. By the time of his death Brassey is said to have built a twentieth of the world's railways. Locke worked with Stephenson and Brunel. 3pp, 12mo. Bifolium with mourning border. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. Endorsed three times. While the recipient is not named, one of the endorsements, on the reverse of the second leaf, reads: 'Locke Memorial | Thos. Brassey asking Mr Manby to obtain permission to erect a window in Westminster Abbey.' The letter begins: 'My Dear Sir, | It would be most gratifying to Mrs.

[ Herbert Trench, Irish Poet ] Autograph Letter Signed Herbert Trench to Douglas Jerrold, author and editor., discussing the imminent performance of Apollo and his other favourite works.

Author: 
Herbert Trench [ Frederic Herbert Trench (1865 – 1923), Irish poet ]
Publication details: 
5 Mansfield PLace, Richmond, Surrey with Printed heading Board of Education Library. and its embossed stamp , 12 November 1907.
£90.00

Three pages, 12mo, bifolium, sl. grubby with remnants indicatiing it was formerly tipped in an album, mainly good. He thanks him for his letter and kind expressions. I am sure to profit by your criticism, whatever it is: & I am very glad indeed to hear you approve of the book. | The first piece 'Apollo & the Seaman' is to be done at the Queen's Hall, in the dark, to 100 instruments: & 100-200 mle voices : the words to be cast upon a sheet. It is an experimental development of the Strauss programme music idea: & will be very unusual.

[Indian Students' Department, East India Association, London.] Six yearly issues of the printed 'Report on the Work of the Indian Students' Department', variously by C. E. Mallet, N. C. Sen and Thomas Quayle, from between July 1912 and 31 March 1922.

Author: 
Indian Students' Department, East India Association, London (C. E. Mallet, N. C. Sen and Thomas Quayle) [Office of the High Commissioner for India]
Publication details: 
London: His Majesty's Stationery Office [the last published by the Office of the High Commissioner for India]. Six items: a run of four from July 1912/June 1913 to July 1915/June 1916; with: 1 April 1920/31 March 1921 and 1 April 1921/31 March 1922.
£450.00

From the papers held at the headquarters of the National Indian Association and the Northbrook Society, 21 Cromwell Road, London (referred to in the report for 1912/1913 as 'The House in Cromwell Road' and 'The London Bureau' and 'still to a large extent the headquarters of the Student's Department'; and in the report for 1914/1915 as 'Mr. Arnold's Bureau', referring to 'Mr. T. W. Arnold, C.I.E., the Educational Adviser in London'). For the context see F. H. Brown's article 'Indian Students in Great Britain' (with 'Discussion'), Asiatic Review, July 1925, quoting Sir Charles E.

[Robert Lax inscribes a copy of his first book to the playwright Christopher Fry and his wife, 'merely to think of whom gladdens the heart & makes the countenance shine'.] The Circus of the Sun. [Signed by Lax and illustrator Emil Antonucci.]

Author: 
Robert Lax (1915-2000), American poet, friend of Thomas Merton; Emil Antonucci (1929-2006), artist, illustrator and proprietor of the Journeyman Press, New York [Christopher Fry]
Publication details: 
New York: Journeyman Books, 1959.
£380.00

[55]pp, 8vo. Number 448 of 500 copies, with colophon signed by 'Robert Lax' and illustrator 'Emil Antonucci'. In quarter binding of spine in plain black cloth and paper boards on which are printed circus photographs by Charles Harbutt. Nice inscription on front free endpaper: 'For Mr & Mrs Chistopher Fry, merely to think of whom gladdens the heart & makes the countenance shine, | Robert Lax'. Lacking the original plain glassine dustwrapper. In good condition, apart from a 6 cm horizontal cut or rub mark to the front board, which is not overly obtrusive.

[William Thomas Manning, Episcopalian Bishop of New York.] Autograph Letter Signed, on his appointment, to Samuel Bickersteth, Canon of Canterbury Cathedral, which he considers 'the centre of our whole Communion and of our Mother Church of England'.

Author: 
William T. Manning [William Thomas Manning] (1866-1949), Episcopalian Bishop of New York, 1921-1946 [Samuel Bickersteth, Canon of Canterbury Cathedral]
Publication details: 
20 April 1921. On letterhead of Four Washington Square.
£120.00

3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, aged and rather creased. Folded twice. Signed 'William T. Manning.' Addressed to 'The Revd. Samuel Bickersteth D.D. | Canon of Canterbury'. Writing after his appointment as Bishop of New York, Manning begins by stating that Bickersteth must be aware of 'the pressure' that he has been under 'during the past weeks', and this is the reason why his 'kind letter' has not been answered sooner. The appointment 'is a tremendous responsibility but with God's help I shall do my best.

[Julian Huxley, biologist, first director of UNESCO.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Julian Huxley.'), complaining of overwork, but offering to read the recipient's father's book in the vacation.

Author: 
Julian Huxley [Sir Julian Sorell Huxley] (1887-1975), evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, first director of UNESCO, brother of Aldous Huxley, grandson of Thomas Henry Huxley
Publication details: 
3 June 1925. On letterhead of New College, Oxford.
£80.00

1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. The recipient is not named. He will 'certainly get hold of' the recipient's father's book, but he will not be able to read it immediately, as he is 'overworked with term'. He will however have 'plenty of leisure in the vacation'.

[Julian Huxley, biologist, first director of UNESCO, as Secretary of Zoological Society of London.] Typed Note with cyclostyled signature, informing Dr Maurice Ernest that he does not consider the 'main thesis' of his book 'biologically justified'.

Author: 
Julian Huxley [Sir Julian Sorell Huxley] (1887-1975), evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, first director of UNESCO, brother of Aldous Huxley, grandson of Thomas Henry Huxley [Dr Maurice Ernest]
Publication details: 
15 March 1941. On letterhead of the Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, N.W.8.
£50.00

1p, 4to. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded three times. Cyclostyled signature: 'Julian S. Huxley'. Addressed to 'Dr. Maurice Ernest, | New Court, | Esher, | Surrey.' He apologises for having been unable to read his book, adding: 'I am afraid I cannot feel that your main thesis is biologically justified'. It is obvious why Huxley did not look beyond the title, as the book he is clearly referring to is Ernest's 'Lives of 300 years and continual rejuvenation' (1942).

[Frederick Yates, actor-manager of the Adelphi Theatre.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Fred. H. Yates.'), accusing actor Thomas Cooke of breaking his word by mounting a production of Fitzball's 'Red Rover', whose copyright he owns, outside Edinburgh.

Author: 
Frederick Yates [Frederick Henry Yates] (1797-1842), actor and proprietor with Charles Mathews of the Adelphi Theatre, London, husband of Elizabeth Brunton [Thomas Potter Cooke (1786-1864), actor]
Publication details: 
18 January 1830. 'Theatre Royal | Adelphi' [London].
£120.00

3pp, 4to. Bifolium. In fair condition, aged and worn, with closed tears and thin vertical strip of paper on reverse of second leaf, which carries a seal in black wax and Yates's address to 'T. P. Cooke Esqre. | 28 Manchester Street | Manchester Square'. An interesting letter regarding a Victorian stage dispute. In an understated style, Yates makes a serious accusation: Cooke has broken his word over the manuscript of Fitzball's play 'The Red Rover' (Yates had produced the piece with himself in the title role in 1828, and would do so again in 1831).

[Horace Smith, poet and friend of Shelley, author with his brother Joseph of the 'Rejected Addresses'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Horatio Smith'), playfully thanking Joseph Blunt for making him 'a present of a pair of horns'.

Author: 
Horace Smith [Horatio Smith] (1779-1849), poet, author his brother Joseph Smith of the 'Rejected Addresses' (1812), friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley [Joseph Blunt]
Publication details: 
3 November 1831. Brighton.
£80.00

2pp, 12mo. On bifolium. Twenty lines of text. In fair condition, aged and worn, with chipping and short closed tears to extremities. Folded twice. Addressed on reverse of second leaf to 'Joseph Blunt Esqre.' Signature underlined with a flourish.

[Thomas Tooke, Victorian economist, throws over Charles Babbage for a 'superior attraction'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Thos. Tooke') to 'Mrs. Hawes', regarding a dinner invitation, sending three trout caught by his son in the Itchen.

Author: 
Thomas Tooke (1774-1858), Victorian economist, for whom the Tooke Chair of Economics at King's College London (LSE) was endowed, and after whom Tooke Town, Millwall, was named [Charles Babbage]
Publication details: 
12 June [no year]; Spring Gardens [London].
£180.00

In 1821, along with Ricardo, Malthus, James Mill, and others, Tooke founded the Political Economy Club. Although Carlyle is unlikely to have had him specifically in mind, Tooke is the archetypal 'Professor of the Dismal Science'. 2pp, 18mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. Twenty-eight lines of text, neatly and closely written. He has 'deferred acknowledging' his answer to her 'kind invitation' to dinner on the coming Saturday until seeing his son, who has been 'out of town on a fishing excursion'.

[Thomas Tooke, Victorian economist, throws over Charles Babbage for a 'superior attraction'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Thos. Tooke') to 'Mrs. Hawes', regarding a dinner invitation, sending three trout caught by his son in the Itchen.

Author: 
Thomas Tooke (1774-1858), Victorian economist, for whom the Tooke Chair of Economics at King's College London (LSE) was endowed, and after whom Tooke Town, Millwall, was named [Charles Babbage]
Publication details: 
12 June [no year]; Spring Gardens [London].
£180.00

In 1821, along with Ricardo, Malthus, James Mill, and others, Tooke founded the Political Economy Club. Although Carlyle is unlikely to have had him specifically in mind, Tooke is the archetypal 'Professor of the Dismal Science'. 2pp, 18mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. Twenty-eight lines of text, neatly and closely written. He has 'deferred acknowledging' his answer to her 'kind invitation' to dinner on the coming Saturday until seeing his son, who has been 'out of town on a fishing excursion'.

[William Thomas Manning, Episcopalian Bishop of New York.] Autograph Letter Signed, on his appointment, to Samuel Bickersteth, Canon of Canterbury Cathedral, which he considers 'the centre of our whole Communion and of our Mother Church of England'.

Author: 
William T. Manning [William Thomas Manning] (1866-1949), Episcopalian Bishop of New York, 1921-1946 [Samuel Bickersteth, Canon of Canterbury Cathedral]
Publication details: 
20 April 1921. On letterhead of Four Washington Square.
£120.00

3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, aged and rather creased. Folded twice. Signed 'William T. Manning.' Addressed to 'The Revd. Samuel Bickersteth D.D. | Canon of Canterbury'. Writing after his appointment as Bishop of New York, Manning begins by stating that Bickersteth must be aware of 'the pressure' that he has been under 'during the past weeks', and this is the reason why his 'kind letter' has not been answered sooner. The appointment 'is a tremendous responsibility but with God's help I shall do my best.

[Julian Huxley, biologist, first director of UNESCO.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Julian Huxley.'), complaining of overwork, but offering to read the recipient's father's book in the vacation.

Author: 
Julian Huxley [Sir Julian Sorell Huxley] (1887-1975), evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, first director of UNESCO, brother of Aldous Huxley, grandson of Thomas Henry Huxley
Publication details: 
3 June 1925. On letterhead of New College, Oxford.
£80.00

1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. The recipient is not named. He will 'certainly get hold of' the recipient's father's book, but he will not be able to read it immediately, as he is 'overworked with term'. He will however have 'plenty of leisure in the vacation'.

[Julian Huxley, biologist, first director of UNESCO, as Secretary of Zoological Society of London.] Typed Note with cyclostyled signature, informing Dr Maurice Ernest that he does not consider the 'main thesis' of his book 'biologically justified'.

Author: 
Julian Huxley [Sir Julian Sorell Huxley] (1887-1975), evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, first director of UNESCO, brother of Aldous Huxley, grandson of Thomas Henry Huxley [Dr Maurice Ernest]
Publication details: 
15 March 1941. On letterhead of the Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, N.W.8.
£50.00

1p, 4to. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded three times. Cyclostyled signature: 'Julian S. Huxley'. Addressed to 'Dr. Maurice Ernest, | New Court, | Esher, | Surrey.' He apologises for having been unable to read his book, adding: 'I am afraid I cannot feel that your main thesis is biologically justified'. It is obvious why Huxley did not look beyond the title, as the book he is clearly referring to is Ernest's 'Lives of 300 years and continual rejuvenation' (1942).

[Horace Smith, poet and friend of Shelley, author with his brother Joseph of the 'Rejected Addresses'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Horatio Smith'), playfully thanking Joseph Blunt for making him 'a present of a pair of horns'.

Author: 
Horace Smith [Horatio Smith] (1779-1849), poet, author his brother Joseph Smith of the 'Rejected Addresses' (1812), friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley [Joseph Blunt]
Publication details: 
3 November 1831. Brighton.
£80.00

2pp, 12mo. On bifolium. Twenty lines of text. In fair condition, aged and worn, with chipping and short closed tears to extremities. Folded twice. Addressed on reverse of second leaf to 'Joseph Blunt Esqre.' Signature underlined with a flourish.

[H. Buxton Forman, literary forger, T. J. Wise's partner-in-crime.] Autograph Letter Signed ('H Buxton Forman') to 'Mr Walker', regarding a 'translation of Villon' and 'the transcript of your Shelley letter'.

Author: 
H. Buxton Forman [Harry Buxton Forman] (1842-1917), literary forger, partner-in-crime of Thomas James Wise, literary editor whose work includes editions of the letters of Shelley and of Keats
Publication details: 
10 October 1898. 28 Marlborough Hill, St John's Wood, N.W. [London] 10 October 1898.
£180.00

1p, 16mo. In fair condition, lightly aged and creased. He is sending Walker the 'long-delayed translation of Villon, - for which I have undertaken to receive such subscribers' guineas as were promised through me'. He thanks him for sending corrections of Forman's 'transcript' of Walker's 'Shelley letter', sent 'in plenty of time for my purpose'. The recipient would appear to be the 'Mr. Walker, of Westminster' referred to in Forman's edition of Shelley's letters.

[Thomas Adolphus Trollope, prolific author, older brother of Anthony Trollope.] Autograph Signature ('T. Adolphus Trollope') on part of letter.

Author: 
Thomas Adolphus Trollope (1810-1892), prolific author with a renowned villa in Florence, elder brother of the novelist Anthony Trollope, husband of Theodosia Trollope and Frances Eleanor Trollope
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£25.00

On one side of 5 x 13 cm slip of paper cut from the end of a letter. In good condition, lightly aged, with central vertical fold. Laid down on piece of paper removed from album. Reads: '[...] I shall be delighted to come to you. | Yrs always faithfully | T. Adolphus Trollope'.

[Mayne Reid, Irish novelist on American themes.] Autograph Letter Signed to 'J. Froebel' [Julius Fröbel] regarding arrangements for the translation, editing and publication of his book 'Aus Amerika'.

Author: 
Mayne Reid [Thomas Mayne Reid] (1818-1883), Irish novelist who lived for long periods in America and wrote on American themes [Julius Fröbel [Froebel] (1805-1893), German geologist and traveller]
Publication details: 
23 November [1858]; Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire.
£250.00

8pp, 12mo. On two bifoliums. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. Signed 'Mayne Reid', and written from the sprawling 'Rancho' which he built at Gerrards Cross, in imitation of a Mexican hacienda. The recipient is named by Reid as 'J. Froebel', i.e. Julius Froebel, and the subject is arrangements for the translation translation of his book 'Aus Amerika' (Leipzig, 1857), which would be published in London by Richard Bentley in 1859 under the title 'Seven Years' Travel in Central America, Northern Mexico, and the Far West of the United States'.

[Benjamin Bartrum, auctioneer.] Autograph household 'Inventory & Valuation' of 'the property of Thomas Harward Gardiner Esq' ('Common Brewer'), signed 'Benjn. Bartrum | Bath', containing furniture, plate, books, wearing apparel, jewels, wines.

Author: 
Benjamin Bartrum [Benjamin Thomas Bartrum] (1783-1846), Bath auctioneer [Thomas Harward Gardiner (d. 1841), 'Common Brewer' of Bath; Thomas Gainsborough; Margaret Burr Gainsborough]
Publication details: 
Bath: 'taken and made' on 26 and 27 March 1841.
£320.00

11pp, folio. In good condition, lightly aged and worn. Folded twice into the conventional packet. Ten-page inventory, followed by full page valuation, neatly written out on six leaves, which are stitched together, with the reverse of the last leaf carrying the title written lengthwise in conventional style for the outside of the packet: 'Inventory & Valuation of the several effects of the late Thos. Harward Gardiner Esq deceased at No. 14 Brock Street Bath | Amount £574. 8. 6', along with the word 'Copy' in red. Also on this page, in pencil in an early twentieth century hand: '?

[Richard Carlile writes from Dorchester Gaol following his conviction for blasphemous libel.] Original number of Carlile's 'The Republican', as issued from press in original blue covers, containing various pieces relating to his imprisonment.

Author: 
Richard Carlile (1790-1843), publisher and writer, leader of the Rotunda Radicals, disciple of Tom Paine, lover of Elizabeth Sharples (1803-1852), suffragist
Publication details: 
[The Republican, London.] 18 January 1822. No. 3. Vol. V. Printed and Published by R. Carlile, 55, Fleet Street.
£280.00

A nice artefact, a number of Carlile's celebrated radical journal 'The Republican' (espousing not only republicanism but also atheism, abolitionism and birth control) as it appeared from the press. For information on Carlile - described by E. P. Thompson as a 'Showman of Free Thought' - and his 'moral wife' the suffragist Eliza Sharples, see their entries in the Oxford DNB. For publishing various 'blasphemous' works by Thomas Paine, Carlile was fined £1500 and sentenced to three years in Dorchester Gaol.

[Richard Carlile, leader of the Rotunda Radicals.] Two Autograph Letters Signed to 'Mr. Teague', i.e. John Teague, Keeper of the Giltspur Street Compter where Carlile was incarcerated, regarding editing proofs and having his head cast by phrenolog

Author: 
Richard Carlile (1790-1843), publisher and writer, leader of the Rotunda Radicals, lover of Elizabeth Sharples (1803-1852), suffragist [John Teague (1779-1841), Keeper of the Giltspur Street Compter
Publication details: 
'Compter Decr. 29. 1834'. [Giltspurt Street Compter, London]
£950.00

For information on Carlile - described by E. P. Thompson as a 'Showman of Free Thought' - and his 'moral wife' the suffragist Eliza Sharples, see their entries in the Oxford DNB. At the time of writing Carlile was in prison for refusal to pay the church rates. The proofs Carlile asks to be allowed to receive in the first letter are presumably those of his journal 'The Gauntlet'. The phrenologist 'Mr. Hohn' referred to in the second of the letters - the 'Mr. Holme' of the accompanying slip - is the German-born physician and phrenologist John Diederick Holm (d.1856).

[Gilbert White, naturalist.] Original Manuscript, said to have been dictated by White himself, of 'Gilbert White's statement' on the venomous properties of the toad, with eleven authorial emendations. Together with a series of thermometer readings.

Author: 
Gilbert White (1720-1793), naturalist and ornithologist, author of the celebrated 'Natural History of Selborne' (1789) [Thomas Bell (1792-1880), zoologist]
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£800.00

A very nice artefact of one of the best-loved books in the England language, Gilbert White's 'Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne', which at one point was claimed to be the fourth most-printed book after the Bible, Shakespeare, and Bunyan's 'Pilgrim's Progress'. White's entry in the Oxford DNB concludes by describing the book as 'an expression of universal thanksgiving, treasured by all'. The present item is the original manuscript of what White's editor Thomas Bell describes as 'Gilbert White's statement' on the venomous properties of the toad, first printed in a footnote (signed 'T.

[J. O. Halliwell-Phillipps, Shakespearian scholar and antiquarian.] Autograph Letter Signed ('J. O. Halliwell') to Messrs Dickinson & Co., settling a bill and praising the paper supplied by them for his 'folio edition of Shakespear now completed'.

Author: 
J. O. Halliwell-Phillipps [James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps, born James Orchard Halliwell] (1820-1889), Shakespearean scholar, antiquarian, and folklorist [John Dickinson & Co, papermakers]
Publication details: 
5 May 1866; on letterhead of No. 6, St Mary's Place, West Brompton, London, S.W.
£150.00

For the context see Halliwell-Phillipps's entry in the Oxford DNB, which states that in 1852 he 'offered by subscription the most elaborate Works [of Shakespeare] ever attempted: published between 1853 and 1865 in sixteen thick folio volumes, lavishly illustrated by F. W. Fairholt and limited to 150 copies, it was initially priced 2 guineas a volume.

[Gilbert White, naturalist.] Original Manuscript, said to have been dictated by White himself, of 'Gilbert White's statement' on the venomous properties of the toad, with eleven authorial emendations. Together with a series of thermometer readings.

Author: 
Gilbert White (1720-1793), naturalist and ornithologist, author of the celebrated 'Natural History of Selborne' (1789) [Thomas Bell (1792-1880), zoologist]
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£3,500.00

A very nice artefact of one of the best-loved books in the England language, Gilbert White's 'Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne', which at one point was claimed to be the fourth most-printed book after the Bible, Shakespeare, and Bunyan's 'Pilgrim's Progress'. White's entry in the Oxford DNB concludes by describing the book as 'an expression of universal thanksgiving, treasured by all'. The present item is the original manuscript of what White's editor Thomas Bell describes as 'Gilbert White's statement' on the venomous properties of the toad, first printed in a footnote (signed 'T.

[Charles B. Wilder, Boston abolitionist.] Printed pamphlet: 'An Inquiry into the Causes of Frequent Changes in the Ministry, and the Diminished Power of the Churches to hold the People in the House of God.'

Author: 
C. B. Wilder [Charles B. Wilder, Boston abolitionist and Superintendent of Contrabands] [Beacon Press, Boston; Thomas Todd, Printer; Congregational House]
Publication details: 
Boston: Beacon Press: Thomas Todd, Printer, Congregational House, Room 25, 1881.
£50.00

[2] + 16pp, 8vo. In wraps on the front cover of which is printed the title-page, with a 'Note' by Wilder on the reverse. Sixteen pages of text with drop-head title: 'Churches and Ministers Considered'. In poor condition, aged and worn. Wilder's note explains his motive for writing: 'I am nearly four-score years of age - my life covering almost three generations. My opportunities for observation in city and country, North, South, East, and West, have been abundant.

[Eleanor Farjeon, children's writer.] Typed chatty retelling of the story of Theseus and the Minotaur, under the title 'The Simple Facts', and ending 'don't believe a word I say'. Signed by Farjeon 'From E. F.', with her address.

Author: 
Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965), noted children's writer, several of whose works were illustrated by Edward Ardizzone
Publication details: 
No date. 20 Perrin's Walk, N.W.3. [London]
£180.00

1p, 4to. Typescript with a couple of minor autograph corrections. Unpublished, but perhaps relating to her 1945 book 'Ariadne and the Bull'. At foot, in Farjeon's autograph: 'From E. F. | 20 Perrin's Walk | N.W.3.' In fair condition, on aged and worn paper, with nicking and loss at edges. A chatty and entertaining retelling of the story. As an example of the tone, early on Farjeon writes: 'The Minotaur was a monster with the gigantic body of a man topped by a bull's head; his father was a bull and his mother was Pasiphae, Minos's Queen.

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