STREET

[Frank Miles, artist, friend of Oscar Wilde, and Jack the Ripper suspect.] Autograph Note Signed ('Frank Miles') to an autograph hunter, gracefully supplying his own.

Author: 
Frank Miles [George Francis Miles] (1852-1891), artist and friend of Oscar Wilde, architect, gardener and Jack the Ripper suspect
Publication details: 
No date. 26 Tite Street, Chelsea [London].
£90.00

1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged, with minor traces of glue from mount on reverse. Folded once. Reads: '26 Tite St. | Chelsea | Pray forgive me for not having answered before | If you are glad to have my handwriting, then I am gladder to send it to you. | Frank Miles'. The house in Tite Street which Miles had E. W. Godwin build for him, and at which his friend Oscar Wilde lived as a 'boarder', was originally numbered 1, then 26, and now 44.

[George Holyoake, radical editor who coined the terms 'secularism' and 'jingoism'.] Autograph Letter Signed ('G. J. Holyoake') to 'Watson'

Author: 
George Holyoake [George Jacob Holyoake] (1817-1906), radical editor who coined the terms 'secularism' and 'jingoism'
Publication details: 
25 March 1900. Eastern Lodge, Brighton.
£56.00

3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, aged and worn. Folded twice. Only the conclusion of the letter is in Holyoake's hand. It carries an unusually large and bold signature. In reply to a letter of Watson's he states that he was not aware of the 'paper in the Westminster Gazette [...] until four days after its appearance'. He asks him to send 'the Leader referring to its appearance which you mention', and commends Watson's son for bringing it to his notice. Holyoake does not know if the matter has 'been mentioned elsewhere in Newcastle'.

[Richard Carlile, leader of the Rotunda Radicals.] Two Autograph Letters Signed to 'Mr. Teague', i.e. John Teague, Keeper of the Giltspur Street Compter where Carlile was incarcerated, regarding editing proofs and having his head cast by phrenolog

Author: 
Richard Carlile (1790-1843), publisher and writer, leader of the Rotunda Radicals, lover of Elizabeth Sharples (1803-1852), suffragist [John Teague (1779-1841), Keeper of the Giltspur Street Compter
Publication details: 
'Compter Decr. 29. 1834'. [Giltspurt Street Compter, London]
£950.00

For information on Carlile - described by E. P. Thompson as a 'Showman of Free Thought' - and his 'moral wife' the suffragist Eliza Sharples, see their entries in the Oxford DNB. At the time of writing Carlile was in prison for refusal to pay the church rates. The proofs Carlile asks to be allowed to receive in the first letter are presumably those of his journal 'The Gauntlet'. The phrenologist 'Mr. Hohn' referred to in the second of the letters - the 'Mr. Holme' of the accompanying slip - is the German-born physician and phrenologist John Diederick Holm (d.1856).

[Barry Pain, writer.] Autograph Letter Signed [to James Payn, editor of the Cornhill Magazine], discussing the reception of his breakthrough story 'The Hundred Gates', the next story he has planned, and the pressures of his teaching work.

Author: 
Barry Pain [Barry Eric Odell Pain] (1864-1928), writer of light verse and humorous stories, and horror and fantasy fiction [James Payn (1830-1898), editor of the Cornhill Magazine]
Publication details: 
5 October 1889; Edgeborough, Guildford, Surrey.
£180.00

3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. Fifty-one lines of text in a close neat hand, the last page written lengthwise. In good condition, lightly aged, with traces of white paper mount adhering to blank reverse of second leaf. Folded once. The letter is signed 'Barry Pain'. The recipient is not named, but is James Payn, editor of the Cornhill Magazine, who had just published the story that made Pain's name, 'The Hundred Gates'.

['Mrs. Oliphant' (Margaret Oliphant Wilson Oliphant), Scottish author.] Autograph Letter Signed ('M. O. W. Oliphant') to 'Mr. Payn', i.e. James Payn, editor of the Cornhill Magazine, submitting for publication her son's story 'The Grateful Ghosts'.

Author: 
'Mrs. Oliphant' [Margaret Oliphant Wilson Oliphant] (1828-1897), Scottish novelist and historical writer [James Payn (1830-1898), editor of the Cornhill Magazine]
Publication details: 
12 December [circa 1885]; on 'Windsor' letterhead.
£100.00

1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. Referring to her son Francis Romano ('Cecco') Oliphant (1859-1894), she writes: 'Dear Mr. Payn | I send you with this in a registered packet by book post a story written by my youngest son, called "The Grateful Ghosts" which he wishes me to submit to you.' Her opinion is that the story 'would bear compression but that is usual to youthful productions'. She will be 'much gratified' if Payn likes it 'and can use it', and feels sure he will give it his consideration.

[Sterling Heilig, American journalist.] Typed Letter Signed ('Sterling Heilig.') to Fleet Street journalist 'A. T. Q. C.', discussing his 'business of writing sensational letters to the American Sunday papers' and 'cribbing' (plagiarism).

Author: 
Sterling Heilig (1864-1928) of Philadelphia, American author, journalist and war correspondent [Fleet Street journalism; fin-de-siècle]
Publication details: 
'40 rue Laffitte, Paris, | September 29, 1894.'
£180.00

1p, 4to. On leaf of aged, worn and creased cartridge paper. Addressed to 'A. T. Q. C., | Care of The Editor of | The Speaker, 115, Fleet Street, E.C., London.' An interesting letter, touching on English and American journalistic practice, 'sensational' copy, plagiarism and fin-de-siècle Paris. The context is not entirely clear: one reading is that the recipient reported on or reproduced in the Fleet Street newspaper the Speaker one of Heilig's 'sensational letters to the American Sunday papers', only to have it 'cribbed' by Pearson's Weekly.

[James Doherty, Soho School, Nassau Street, Soho: Georgian school magazine.] The Athenaeum. Conducted by the Senior Pupils of J. Doherty, Esq. A.B.

Author: 
James Doherty, Soho School, Nassau Street, Soho
Publication details: 
9 June 1823. Vol. I. No. 7. 'Communications to be addressed (post paid) to the Editors, at C. Handy's, 50, Brewer Street, Golden Square.'
£150.00

[8]pp, 12mo, paginated 45-52. Unbound, on two loose bifoliums, one inserted inside the other. Drophead title.

[John Milton, England's epic poet.] Ten photographic prints of engraved portraits of John Milton, marked up in pencil on the back with instructions for making a block for publication ('Sphere Strip').

Author: 
John Milton, England's epic poet, author of 'Paradise Lost'
Publication details: 
No date or place. [The Sphere, Fleet Street, London? Edwardian?]
£45.00

Ten photographic prints of engraved portraits of Milton, ranging in size from 12.5 x 7.5 cm to 16 x 12 cm. In fair overall condition, with slight age and wear. From different sources. All black and white or sepia, and with a pre-First World War feel. Numbered in pencil on reverse, between 1 and 12 (2 and 3 missing from the sequence), and all with 'Sphere Strip' and '18343'. No. 3 has the following instructions on the reverse: '17th Century | Touch up original where wanted so that the block will come out sharp & clear'.

['Mark Twain' (Samuel Langhorne Clemens), great American writer.] Envelope addressed to 'S. L. Clement, Esqr. | "Mark Twain"', at 'Buckenham Hall', and forwarded to 88 Brook Street, with annotations and eight postmarks.

Author: 
'Mark Twain', pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910), great American writer, creator of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, described by William Faulkner as 'the father of American literature'
Twain
Publication details: 
Sent from Belfast to Brandon in Norfolk, and then on to London. November 1887.
£90.00
Twain

8.5 x 14 envelope. In fair condition, aged and creased. Torn open, with slight loss to flap. A nice Mark Twain artefact, and something of a puzzle, as he does not appear to have been in England at the time. There does not appear to be any connection between Twain and William Amhurst Tyssen-Amherst (1835-1909), 1st Baron Amherst of Hackney, whose London address was 88 Brook Street, Grosvenor Square.

[Liberty's of London: 1912 women's fashion catalogue.] Printed catalogue of 'Picturesque Dresses Designed By Liberty & Co' ('Costumes never out of fashion' and 'Novelties for the season'), with 59 full-page illustrations on perforated paper.

Author: 
[Liberty's; Liberty & Co Ltd, London and Paris; women's fashion catalogue, 1912]
Publication details: 
Autumn 1912 ('SERIES XXXVIII.'). 'Copyright by Liberty & Co Ltd Regent Street, London & Boulevard des Capucines, Paris.'
£250.00

A scarce item, and considering its perforation, fortunately found in its complete state. No copy on OCLC WorldCat, which does however have entries for copies of similar Liberty's 1910 ('SERIES XXXIII') and 1913 catalogues, the latter at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 64pp, 8vo. Stitched into oat-coloured cloth soft covers, with decorative border and title printed on front cover. In fair internal condition: on lightly aged and spotted paper. In worn and stained wraps. The five pages of text and fifty-nine full-page illustrations are printed in brown on cream paper.

[Samuel Pepys, diarist.] Two albums containing a collection of more than 500 cuttings on Pepys from English newspapers, begun by W. H. Whitear, completed by Edwin Chappell, with a few by David Dale, with collection of 57 lantern slides for lecture.

Author: 
Samuel Pepys, diarist; Edwin Chappell (1883-1938), Pepys scholar and maritime historian, lecturer at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich; Walter H. Whitear (c.1853-1932); David Dale; Royal Navy
Publication details: 
Two volumes containing cuttings from Fleet Street and provincial newspapers, dating from between 1906 and 1939. Lantern slides undated, but collection includes advertisement for lecture in 1938.
£500.00

Three items, including two substantial albums containing in excess of 500 newspaper cuttings. The first album was commenced in 1906 by Pepys scholar Walter Henry Whitear, and completed by Chappell after Whitear's death in 1932, the last cuttings in it dating from the following year.

[Infanticide by Harriet Salmon of Sudbury, Suffolk, 1861: Victorian Murder Ballad in Welsh.] Printed street ballad titled: 'Can newydd yn rhoddi hanes Harriet Salmon yn agos i Sudbury, yn swydd Suffolk'.

Author: 
[Victorian Murder Ballad in Welsh; infanticide by Harriet Salmon of Sudbury, Suffolk, 1861; nineteenth-century street ballad; popular literature]
Publication details: 
[Welsh, post 1861.]
£220.00

The full title reads: 'Can newydd yn rhoddi hanes Harriet Salmon yn agos i Sudbury, yn swydd Suffolk, yr hon a foddodd ddau o'i phlant, un yn bum mlwydd oed, a'r llall yn wyth mlwydd, ac a gynygiodd foddi ei phlentyn sugno, ar y 24ain o Fawrth, 1861'. This translates as: 'A new song telling the story of Harriet Salmon, of Sudbury, Suffolk, who drowned her children, one aged five, the other eight, and who attempted to drown her babe in arms, on 24 March 1861.' 4pp, 16mo (15.5 x 8.5 cm). Paginated [1]-4. Bifolium. Vignette of sheep at foot of last page.

[David Davies ('Dai'r Cantwr'), the Rebecca Riots and Transportation to Australia: Victorian Welsh street ballad.] Printed poem, titled: 'Can Hiraethlon David Davies (Dai'r Cantwr,) Pan yn Garcharor yng Nghaerfyrddin, am y Terfysg yn amser Becca'.

Author: 
David Davies (c.1812-1874), Welsh poet known as Dai'r Cantwr (David the Singer), transported to Van Diemen's Land after the Rebecca Riots [nineteenth-century Welsh street ballad]
Publication details: 
No place or date. [Welsh, late Victorian.]
£280.00

The full title reads: 'Can Hiraethlon | David Davies (Dai'r Cantwr,) | Pan yn Garcharor yng Nghaerfyrddin, am y Terfysg yn amser Becca. | Cenir ar y dôn “Roslin Castle.'” The title may be translated as 'A nostalgic song, written when a prisoner in Carmarthen, for the riot in Becca's time. | Sung to the tune of 'Roslin Castle'. 4pp, 12mo (15.5 x 9 cm). Paginated [1]-4. Disbound. A frail survival: aged and worn, with damp-stain along one edge. Beneath the title is a small vignette of a sailing ship, and at the end of the final page is another of a crown. Poem in four sixteen-line stanzas.

[Two Victorian Welsh street ballads, one with engraved advertisement for 'FINE TEAS AND TOBACCO'.] Two poems printed together: 'Cerdd y Tobacco' and 'Can y Bachgen Main'.

Author: 
[Nineteenth-century Welsh street ballads; tobacco; smoking]
Publication details: 
No place or date. [Welsh, late Victorian.]
£100.00

4pp, 16mo (15.5 x 9 cm). Paginated [1]-4. Bifolium. Disbound. A frail survival, aged and worn. The first leaf (pp.1-2) carries the poem 'Cerdd y Tobacco' ('The Tobacco Poem'), in five eight-line stanzas, with the title followed by a half-page stock woodcut (evidently from a tobacconist's advertisement) of an oriental figure seated on crates on the dockside, with sailing ship in the background. At the foot is engraved: 'FINE TEAS AND TOBACCO'. The second leaf (pp.3-4) carries the poem 'Can y Bachgen Main' ('Song of the Slender Boy'), in six eight-line stanzas.

[Bedwellty Colliery Explosion, 1865: street ballad in Welsh, with list of names of deceased.] Printed item titled: 'Hanes alarus am 26 o golliers a gollasant eu bywydau yn pwll glo Bedwellty, gerllaw Tredegar, Dydd Gwener, Mehefin 16, 1865.'

Author: 
[Bedwellty Colliery Explosion, 1865; Welsh street ballad; coal mining]
Publication details: 
Printed by 'William Thomas, Argraffydd, Caerfyrddin.' No date [late Vicvtorian].
£65.00

The title is 'Hanes alarus am 26 o golliers a gollasant eu bywydau yn pwll glo Bedwellty, gerllaw Tredegar, Dydd Gwener, Mehefin 16, 1865.' This may be translated as 'The woeful tale of 26 colliers who lost their lives in the Bedwellty coal mine, near Tredegar, Friday, 16 June 1865. 4pp 16mo (15.5 x 9 cm). Paginated [1]-4. Bifolium. Printer's slug at foot of last page. Disbound. A frail survival: aged and worn.

[Two Printed Victorian Welsh Migration Street Ballads by Isaac Thomas of Aberdare.] 'Morgan Bach a'i fam yn ymddiddan ynghylch myned i Australia' and 'Dychweliad Morgan Bach o Awstralia, A'i fam (Gwen o'r Gyrnos) yn methu ei adnabod.'

Author: 
Isaac Thomas of Aberdare [Welsh Migration Street Ballads; Victorian popular literature; nineteenth-century emigration to Australia]
Publication details: 
Welsh, late nineteenth century. Both without date or publication details.
£450.00

Two Welsh street ballads, indicative of the desire for emigration during a period of hardship. Both 4pp, 16mo (15 x 9 cm). Both bifoliums, and both paginated [1]-4. Frail survivals, heavily aged and worn. ONE: 'Morgan Bach a'i fam yn ymddiddan ynghylch myned i Australia'. Vignette of a sailing ship beneath the title, which translates as 'Young Morgan and his mother talking about going to Australia'. Poem of eleven eight-line stanzas, in the form of a dialogue between the 'Y FAM' and 'MORGAN'. Signed in type at end: 'ISAAC THOMAS.

[John Mortimer Hunt, partner in Bond Street silversmiths Hunt & Roskell.] Autograph Letter Signed ('J. Mortimer Hunt'), regarding a 'stone implement' brought by 'Mr Roskell' from Australia, the Society of Antiquaries, and the recipient's health.

Author: 
John Mortimer Hunt, partner in the firm of Hunt & Roskell [successors to Storr & Mortimer], jewellers and silversmiths, Bond Street, London [Australia; Australian archaeology]
Publication details: 
156 New Bond Street [London]. 31 May 1871.
£180.00

4pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice. For information regarding this renowned firm of silversmiths, which possessed the royal warrant and mounted a sumptuous display at the Great Exhibition, see Norman Mosley Penzer, 'Paul Storr, 1771-1844, Silversmith and Goldsmith' (1954), and John Culme, 'Directory of Gold and Silversmiths' (2000). The nature of the '”Australian” implement' which is the subject of the letter is unclear, but information on Hunt's partner's connection with Australia is to be found in L. W.

[ Neville Chamberlain, Prime Minister. ] Two prints of portrait photographs by royal photographer Marcus Adams, with a pencil study from one of them by Adams on the reverse.

Author: 
Marcus Adams (), royal photographer [ Neville Chamberlain [ Arthur Neville Chamberlain ] (1869-1940), British Conservative Prime Minister ]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. (Late 1930s.)
£150.00

Neither print is ascribed, but in an unpublished typescript in the Adams Papers, Rosalind Thuillier (author of a 1985 monograph on Adams) quotes her husband Gilbert Adams (Marcus's son) as follows: 'Another phase of his activities as a photographer was into a device called "photo sculpture". [...] At the time of Munich he went round to the photo-sculpture's studio, and I accompanied him, to photograph Neville Chamberlain. Neville Chamberlain was photographed in this way and some many hundreds of these casts were made of him.

[Barry Pain, Punch humorist and author of novels, poems and ghost stories.] Autograph Manuscript of long poem titled 'The Dream of Fine Editors | (after the dinner to J. N. Dunn. April 23rd. 1897)'.

Author: 
Barry Pain [Barry Eric Odell Pain] (1864-1928), author, journalist, Punch humorist, author of ghost stories [Fleet Street; James Nicol Dunn; Charles Norris Williamson; Oswald Crawfurd]
Publication details: 
[London. 1897.]
£580.00

4pp, 12mo. On four loose leaves. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with minor traces of grey paper mount along edges on blank reverses. The poem is titled 'The Dream of Fine Editors | (after the dinner to J. N. Dunn. April 23rd. 1897)'. (At the time of the dinner the Scottish journalist James Nicol Dunn (1856-1919) was on the verge of being appointed editor of the Morning Post, a position he would hold from May 1897 to January 1905.) There is no record of the poem having been published, and it is likely to have been written for after-dinner recitation only.

[The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820; Arthur Thistlewood and Lord Liverpool.] Printed handbill: 'Conspiracy | A Particular Account of the Treasonable Plot formed, for the destruction of His Majesty's Ministers!!!'

Author: 
The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820; Arthur Thistlewood (1774-1820); Lord Liverpool, Prime Minister
Publication details: 
Pollock, Printer, North Shields. No date [March 1820].
£1,200.00

For information regarding the conspiracy to murder Lord Liverpool and his entire cabinet, see Thistlewood's entry in the Oxford DNB. A rare item, with no other copy found either on OCLC WorldCat or on COPAC, and intended for distribution in the streets of the North-East of England as the sensational news of the Conspiracy broke. In small print apart from the heading (which is in the usual mixture for the period of typefaces and point sizes, with fancy rules), on one side of a 42 x 13 cm strip of laid paper.

[Thomas Downey, artist, illustrator and cartoonist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Yours to command | Thos. Downey') to 'Mr. Bramley', on a number of topics, including references to Charles Coborn; Attilio Comelli; Alfred Concannon; Alfred Bryan.

Author: 
Thomas Downey, English artist, illustrator, caricaturist and cartoonist [Charles Coborn; Attilio Comelli; Alfred Concannon; Alfred Bryan]
Publication details: 
55 Alexandra Road, Hendon, NW4 [London]. 21 December 1945.
£100.00

Considering his involvement in the artistic world of late-Victorian and Edwardian London – exemplified by the present letter – there is a puzzling lack of information available on Downey. 1p, 8vo. In fair condition, aged and creased, with nicking to edges. An interesting letter, full of content. He writes that he has had 'a rather grim time lately', his sister having fallen ill and died that week.

[Eliza Lynn Linton, novelist, journalist and anti-feminist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('E. Lynn Linton.') congratulating 'Mrs. Broadwood' [i.e. Mary, wife of Thomas Capel Broadwood] on her daughter's marriage to sculptor Thomas Waldo Story.

Author: 
Eliza Lynn Linton (1822-1898), novelist, pioneering woman journalist and anti-feminist [Thomas Waldo Story (1855-1915), Anglo-American sculptor]
Publication details: 
'Hotel d'Italie.' [Florence] 19 December 1881.
£35.00

The letter congratulates the recipient on the engagement of her daughter Ada Maud Broadwood to the Anglo-American sculptor Thomas Waldo Story (1855-1915). Ada Maud Story was the daughter of Mary Davison and Thomas Capel Broadwood, and the granddaughter of the New Orleans jurist Alfred Hennin. In Rome in 1883 she married Story, who was the son of sculptor and writer William Wetmore Story. The couple were friends of the artist James McNeill Whistler. 3pp., 16mo. Bifolium, folded once.

[Lady Louisa Hardy, wife of Sir Thomas Hardy, Captain of HMS Victory at Battle of Trafalgar.] Autograph Letter in the third person to 'Mr Lahee' (the auctioneer Samuel Lahee), concerning Hardy's consent to requirements in a new house

Author: 
Lady Louisa Emily Anna Hardy (1788-1877), wife of Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy (1769-1839)], Royal Navy officer, Captain of HMS Victory at Battle of Trafalgar [Samuel Lahee]
Publication details: 
9 Queen Street, Mayfair [London]. 15 October [no year].
£250.00

Hardy is immortalised in Nelson's dying request 'Kiss me, Hardy.' Lady Hardy was the daughter of Admiral Sir George Cranfield Berkeley (1753-1818). 3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged, with parts of red wax seal and traces of glue from mount on reverse of second leaf, which is addressed 'To | Mr Lahee | 65. New Bond Street'. Folded once.

[George Arbuthnot, civil servant, as Private Secretary to Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir Charles Wood.] Autograph Letter Signed ('G. Arbuthnot') to unnamed editor, sending for publication a corrected copy of speech in reply to motion by Disraeli.

Author: 
George Arbuthnot (1802-1865), senior civil servant [Charles Wood (1800-1885), 1st Viscount Halifax, Conservative Chancellor of the Exchequer]
Publication details: 
Downing Street [London]. 7 April 1849.
£50.00

According to his entry in the Oxford DNB, Arbuthnot 'served as private secretary successively to seven patronage secretaries; to the permanent head of the department, Sir Charles Spearman, and his successor, Sir Charles Trevelyan; to the prime minister, Sir Robert Peel; and to Sir Charles Wood, chancellor of the exchequer in Russell's administration'. The present item was written by Arbuthnot while holding the last position. 1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Laid down on part of a leaf from an album.

['Johnson's Alamode Beef House': celebrated London eaterie associated with Charles Dickens.] Autograph Letter Signed from proprietor R. J. P. Jaquet, asking Sir Herbert Taylor to help with application to Bow Street magistrates Birnie and Minshull.

Author: 
'Johnson's Alamode Beef House', Drury Lane, London, Robert John Philip Jaquet, (1799-1867), proprietor [Sir Herbert Taylor (1775-1839); Sir Richard Birnie (c.1760-1832); Charles Dickens; Bow Street]
Publication details: 
21 Clare Court [Drury Lane, Covent Garden, London]; 2 March 1829.
£450.00

An interesting document relative to London social history, and a nice piece of Dickensiana. George Johnson is said to have established his celebrated restaurant Johnson's Alamode Beef House at 21 Clare Court, Drury Lane, in the 1780s, although the present letter states that it was licensed around 1805 . In 1824 a twelve-year-old Charles Dickens – employed in a nearby blacking warehouse as a result of his father's imprisionment for debt – himself experienced an incident which he later made use of in 'David Copperfield'.

[William Wadd, surgeon-extraordinary to George IV and medical author.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Wm. Wadd') to 'Henry Dewey' [in fact the Yarmouth physician Henry Davey], regarding his 'Universal' print collection and 'Nugae Chirurgicae'.

Author: 
William Wadd (1776-1829), surgeon-extraordinary to George IV and medical author [Henry William Robert Davey of Yarmouth]
Publication details: 
Park Place [London]; 24 April 1825.
£400.00

4pp, 4to. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged, with thin strip of paper from mount adhering to reverse of second leaf, which is addressed by Wadd, with his seal in red wax (the breaking of which has caused slight loss to a couple of words), to 'Henry Dewey Esqr | Surgeon | King Street | Yarmouth | Norfolk'. The recipient is in fact the surgeon Henry William Robert Davey (1798-1870) of Yarmouth, son of surgeon Henry Sallows Davey (1781-1855) of Beccles. An interesting letter, casting light on print and autograph collecting in Georgian London.

[Sir Henry Holland of Knutsford, physician, travel writer and socialite.] Autograph Letter Signed ('H Holland') [to Lovell Reeve?], giving detailed 'memoranda' of his life for inclusion in a 'biography of living men'.

Author: 
Sir Henry Holland (1788-1873) of Knutsford, physician, travel writer and socialite [Lovell Reeve?]
Publication details: 
Brook Street [London]. 2 November 1856.
£500.00

4pp, 4to. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged, with thin strip of paper from mount adhering to one edge. Seventy-four lines of closely and neatly written text. Although the date is somewhat early, the recipient may be Lovell Reeve, editor until 1865 of 'Portraits of Men of Eminence in Literature, Science, and Art, with Biographical Memoirs' (1863-1867). Having received the recipient's letter on his 'return from abroad', Holland states his 'general objection to the biography of living men'.

Sir Francis Carruthers Gould ('FCG'), caricaturist and political cartoonist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('F Carruthers Gould'), declining (as assistant editor of the Westminster Gazette), with much regret, an article by F. W. Sherwood.

Author: 
F. Carruthers Gould [Sir Francis Carruthers Gould] (1844-1925), caricaturist and political cartoonist, who signed his work 'FCG'
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Westminster Gazette, Tudor Street, Blackfriars, E.C. [London] 22 September 1896.
£40.00

1p, 12mo. Aged and worn. Reads: 'I should very much like to use your article, but we are so crowded with matter that I am afraid there is little chance of finding space for a considerable time and I therefore return the MS with much regret.'

[Randolph Spencer-Churchill, Conservative politician, son of Winston Churchill.] Autograph Signature ('Randolph S. Churchill.').

Author: 
Randolph S. Churchill [Randolph Frederick Edward Spencer-Churchill] (1911-1968), Conservative politician and journalist, son of Winston Churchill [Geoffrey Herbert Crump (1891-1984)]
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£25.00

On 10 x 6 cm slip of laid paper cut from an album, with partial ruled border in pink and blue. In good condition, lightly aged. A good firm signature, reading 'Randolph S. Churchill.' No other writing on the same side; with signature of 'Geoffrey H. Crump' on the reverse.

[Eliza Lynn Linton, novelist, pioneering woman journalist and anti-feminist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('E: Lynn Linton') to 'Mr. Tinsley' (William Tinsley, proprietor of Tinsley's Magazine), asking for the return of her rejected article 'We Women'.

Author: 
Eliza Lynn Linton (1822-1898), novelist, pioneering woman journalist and anti-feminist [William Tinsley (1831-1902), publisher]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 6 Fitzroy Street, Fitzroy Square, W. [London] 12 June 1868.
£100.00

2pp, 12mo. In fair condition, on aged paper with central spike hole. Folded twice. Begins: 'My dear Mr. Tinsley, | I see that you are not going to use my article “We Women,” & I want it so much, to form the basis of a set of articles! - & I have no copy.' She notes that it is 'generally the case with regular workers, that the Editors return the rejected MS' and explains that she has 'destroyed the first rough draft', exclaiming: 'I do hope it is not lost!' She asks him to either tell her if it is lost, so that she may 'know the worst', or if it is not lost, '& is not to be used'.

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