BURLESQUE

[ Horace Mills, humorous poet, on First World War Zeppelins. ] Autograph Letter Signed accompanying a printed handbill poem titled 'Disturbed', describing how his peaceful pipe-smoking was disturbed by the 'Zepps'.

Author: 
Horace Mills (1864-1941), author of humorous and children's verse [ Zeppelins in the First World War ]
Publication details: 
Letter from Gunton Cottage, Bennett Park, Blackheath, S.E. [ London ] 26 November 1916. Handbill poem without date or place.
£80.00

Both letter and poem are in good condition, on lightly-aged paper, with a little rust spotting on each from the paperclip that attached them. ONE: Autograph Letter Signed to unnamed lady. 1p., 12mo. He thanks her for liking his 'humble verses', and invites her to drop him a line 're their fate'. TWO: Handbill poem, printed on one side of a 12mo piece of grey paper. Titled 'DISTURBED' and signed in type at end 'HORACE MILLS'. The poem is twenty lines long, and arranged in five four-line stanzas.

[Printed handbill libretto.] The House that Jack built. A Nursery Cantata. With Solos, Choruses, and Incidental Music, Composed expressly for the Royal Aquarium, by Mr. George Fox. The Juvenile Troupe, Under the Direction of Mr. J. E. Nolan.

Author: 
George Fox [The Juvenile Troupe; J. E. Nolan; The Royal Aquarium and Winter Garden, London; Hutchins & Romer, Conduit Street]
The House that Jack built. A Nursery Cantata
Publication details: 
[Circa 1880.] 'The Music Published by Messrs Hutchins & Romer, Conduit Street, Regent Street'.
£56.00
The House that Jack built. A Nursery Cantata

Small 4to, 4 pp. Bifolium. Text clear and complete. Fair, on browned high-acidity paper. Neat strip of stub from mounting in album still adhering to inner margin of verso of second leaf. Headed 'Words.' All but first chorus in double-column. A mixture of the original 'House that Jack built' with 'Jack and Jill'. Begins with 'Chorus. - "This is the house that Jack built."', the first lines of which are 'Our labours are done, our recompense won, | And anger has been on no back spilt, | So now with one voice we'll laugh and rejoice | As this is the house that Jack built.' Characters are: Mr.

Typed Note Signed ('Geo R Sims') to F. Leslie Moreton.

Author: 
George R. Sims [George Robert Sims] (1847-1922), English journalist and writer.
Publication details: 
24 March 1900; on letterhead of 12, Clarence Terrace, Regents Park. N.W. [London].
£45.00

4to: 1 p. Text complete and clear, on aged, spotted and lightly-creased paper. He has exchanged letters with 'Mr Morell' 'with reference to "Faust up to Date" ', but does not believe any contract has yet been arranged. He does not have a copy of 'the Score and Band Parts': 'I should say Mr Geo. Edwardes or Mr Meyer Lutz has these.' Sims co-wrote 'Faust up to Date' with Henry Pettitt. The music was by Lutz. It was produced by Edwardes, and first performed at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 30 October 1888.

Autograph Letter Signed to <J. J. Dolone>, and Hand-coloured Engraved Portrait.

Author: 
Laura Honey [nee Young] ['Mrs Honey']
Publication details: 
The letter without date, but bearing postmark postmark dated 20 May 1838.
£156.00

Letter, docketed 'Mrs Honey', addressed to ' Esqre | York - Leeds - or Hull | Theatre Royal'. Three pages, quarto. Good, though aged and creased, and with small section cut away on breaking seal. Text clear and complete. Small strip of mount adhering to one edge. Interesting and intriguing letter addressed to 'Dearest Papa' and beginning 'Barnett has never been near me nor do I know where to find him - write by return and tell me where I commence and what you would like me to '. Ends by saying she is 'very busy indeed just now'. Signed 'Laura'.

Autograph Note Signed to "[Victorelli?]"

Author: 
Dolph Levino.
Publication details: 
163 Stamford St, no date.
£38.00

American born illustrator and writer of burlesques. One page, 8vo, soiled, chipped and creased but text legible and complete. He is upset at his correspondent's circumstances but has to meet "an enormous doctor's bill and am really unable to do what I would be proud to do." He asks him to "share with me what klitle we can spare and we will see what the morrow will bring forth." He anticipates a meeting and hopes for better luck for his correspondent.

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