JOURNALISM

[Tania Long of the New York Times writes from wartime London on 'queue psychology' in Britain and America.] Typed Letter Signed ('Tania Long Daniell') to Punch editor E. V. Knox, in connection with an article being commissioned from him.

Author: 
Tania Long [Tania Long Daniell] (1913-1998), American journalist and war correspondent [E. V. Knox [Edmund George Valpy Knox] (1881-1971, 'Evoe'), editor of Punch]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the London bureau of the New York Times, Savoy Hotel, London WC2. 24 May 1943.
£450.00

Long's obituary in the New York Times, 6 September 1998, describes her as 'war correspondent for The New York Herald Tribune and The New York Times who covered the London blitz and the Nuremburg trials' and 'one of only a few women who were correspondents in World War II'. She had joined the New York Herald Tribune's London bureau in 1941, and subsequently married Raymond Daniell, chief of the New York Times's London bureau, joining that newspaper as a reporter in February 1942.

[Sidney Dark, journalist and author.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Sidney Dark') to Collin Brooks, editor of 'Truth', regarding an article he was asked to write at a 'very alcoholic Savage lunch'. With copy of Brooks's waggish response.

Author: 
Sidney Dark [Sidney Ernest Dark] (1874-1947), journalist, critic and voluminous author, editor of the Church Times [Collin Brooks (1893-1959), Fleet Street editor]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Lane End Cottage, Sonning, Berkshire. 4 May [1947].
£35.00

ONE: ALS from Dark to Brooks. The handwriting is quite atrocious, and the present transcription is at points tentative. Dark begins by recalling that at 'the delightful & very alcoholic Savage lunch' (i.e. lunch at the Savage Club), Brooks 'suggested that I should write an article for Truth. Perhaps because of the super-abundant alcoholic I have clean forgotten what the article was to he about. If you haven't & still want it, I might be able to write it.' The penultimate sentence is, to this cataloguer at least, indecipherable, apart from the words 'of course in a public sense'.

[Sir Shane Leslie, diplomat, author and Winston Churchill's cousin.] Four Autograph Letters Signed (all 'Shane Leslie'), three to the journalist Collin Brooks and the other a letter of condolence to Brooks's widow. With TLS from Brooks to Leslie.

Author: 
Sir Shane Leslie [Sir John Randolph Leslie] (1885-1971), Irish diplomat, author and first cousin of Sir Winston Churchill [Collin Brooks (1893-1959), Fleet Street journalist]
Publication details: 
Three from London addresses: The Shamrock Club, 28 Hertford Street; 38 Knightsbridge Court, Sloane Street; letterhead of 5 Morpeth Mansions. One from Glaslough, County Monaghan, Eire [Ireland]. 1945 (2), 1948, 1959.
£220.00

The four letters are in good condition, lightly aged and worn. Each 1p., 12mo. The first three letters are written to Brooks, as editor of 'Truth'; the fourth is a letter of condolence to Brooks's wife. In the first letter (14 April 1945) he apologises for the delay in sending in a review: 'I have been two months out of the country and nothing could be forwarded.' He adds: 'I wish I saw more of Charles Webster.

['George' Strube, Daily Express political cartoonist.] Two Typed Letters Signed (both '”George” STRUBE') to journalist Collin Brooks, regarding the the photographic reproduction of a picture. With copy of a letter from Brooks.

Author: 
'George' Strube [Sidney Conrad Strube] (1891-1956), Daily Express political cartoonist, receiving the highest salary in Fleet Street Collin Brooks (1893-1959), journalist, editor of Sunday Dispatch]
Publication details: 
On (different) letterheads of the Daily Express, Fleet Street, London. 18 April and 9 May 1947.
£35.00

Both 1p., 8vo. In good condition, lightly aged and worn, with paperclip stain to first letter. Unusual signature, in block capitals. Both addressed to Brooks at the Savage Club, with both salutations to 'Collin'. ONE: 18 April 1947. Begins: 'My dear Collin, | I consulted my firend in the Process Department here and he said that a half-tone block would not be very successful, as there is a dash of colour in the picture and the half-tone would not bring it out very well. He thought that a photograph on a piece of Matt bromide paper would look much better and not spoil the detail of the drawing.

[Lord Beaverbrook responds to Collin Brooks's appeal for a job.] Two telegrams ('Maxwell Beaverbrook' and 'Max'), one in reply to Brooks's appeal on loss of editorship of Truth, with copy letter from publisher Ronald Staples.

Author: 
Lord Beaverbrook [Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook] (1879-1964), Fleet Street press baron [Collin Brooks, journalist and editor; Ronald Staples, publisher of the magazine 'Truth']
Publication details: 
Four items from 1952, the other from 1950.
£80.00

Five documents. The two telegrams are in fair condition, lightly aged and worn; the other items are in good condition. A photocopy of a typed page from Brooks's diary explains the context in entertaining fashion: '”Staggerer number one,” whispered Dick Swiveller over my shoulder this morning when on my office desk I found a letter from Ronald Staples giving me a twelve month's statutory notice of dismissal from the editorship of Truth.' He explains that the magazine is losing money, and criticises Staples's plans. 'However – here's a how-de-do!

[Hall Caine's brother Ralph threatens Lord Northcliffe's Amalgamated Press with legal action for 'stealing my idea' on popular publishing.] Two Typed Letters Signed from 'Ralph' to his 'Papa & mama', with his Typed 'complete [solicitors'] statement'.

Author: 
Ralph Hall Caine (1865-1939), Isle of Man author and journalist; brother of novelist Hall Caine [Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe; Sir Harold Harmsworth; Amalgamated Press]
Publication details: 
Letters on letterhead of 2 Tudor Street, London E.C. [Amalgamated Press Ltd offices] 15 March and 18 April 1907. Statement without place or date.
£200.00

The three items are in good condition, lightly aged. ONE: TLS, 15 March 1907. 4pp., 4to. He is sending a copy (i.e. Item Three below) of 'a complete statement of what has taken place up to date. In fact it is the actual statement I placed before my Solicitor this afternoon […] Of course this is what we might have expected from these people, and it does not come as a very great surprise. | It is a direct attempt to get out of their obligations, as they have done before, as they can get this new man, and have got him – at something like £500 a year without an interest'.

[Sir Harold Harmsworth, editor of 'The Field', to journalist Collin Brooks.] Typed Letter Signed ('Harold Harmsworth.') to Brooks, regarding his 'accurate picture of Rothermere' and 'that photograph of Northcliffe with Cecil Rhodes'.

Author: 
Sir Harold Harmsworth (1897-1952), editor of the Field, member of a leading Fleet Street family including Viscount Rothermere
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 8 Stratton Street, W.1. [London] 8 April 1948.
£40.00

1p., 4to. In fair condition, lightly aged, with two punch-holes in margin. He has been reading Brooks's book ('Devil's Decade: Portraits of the Nineteen-Thirties') 'during a few days' holiday in Norfolk', and finds it 'excellent': Brooks has 'drawn a very accurate picture of Rothermere'. He proposes a time for them to 'meet again and have lunch'. He wonders whether Brooks 'ever came across that photograph of Northcliffe with Cecil Rhodes which I remember you mentioned you thought you had somewhere or other', asks for a sight of it.

[Henry Sutherland Edward hands over the editorship of the Graphic to Arthur Locker.] Autograph Letter Signed ('H S. Edwards') to 'Richard', regarding his handing over of the editorship of the Graphic to Arthur Locker.

Author: 
Henry Sutherland Edwards (1828-1906), Victorian Fleet Street journalist and author, foreign correspondent of The Times, London [Arthur Locker (1828-1893), editor of The Graphic]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of The Graphic ('An Illustrated Weekly Newspaper, Price Sixpence.'), 109 Strand, W.C. [London] 13 April 1870.
£40.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Addressed to 'My dear Richard'. In the first paragraph he explains that he will not be able to accept his inviation as he is 'obliged to go into the country'. In the second he writes: 'Arthur Locker will succeed me here after the first of May; and he will attend at the office, with me, for about a week before his engagement begins. If you don't know him and if you will look in I will introduce you.' The Graphic was first published on 4 December 1869 by William Luson Thomas's company Illustrated Newspapers Limited.

[Arthur Locker, novelist and journalist, as editor of the Graphic.] Autograph Note Signed ('Arthur Locker | (Ed. Graphic)') to Henry Walker of Worcester, declining an article.

Author: 
Arthur Locker (1828-1893), novelist and journalist, editor of The Graphic
Publication details: 
On letterhead of The Graphic ('An Illustrated Weekly Newspaper, Price Sixpence.'), 109 Strand, W.C. [London]
£30.00

1p., 12mo. On grey paper. Aged and with light discoloration and chipping along one edge. A somewhat barbed missive, reading: 'Sir, | I thank you for your offer, but I have so many subjects on hand just now that I fear I could not find room for your article even if I approved of it.' The Graphic was first published on 4 December 1869 by William Luson Thomas's company Illustrated Newspapers Limited, with Henry Sutherland Edwards (1828-1906) as editor. Locker had taken over the editorship only a few days before the writing of this note, on 1 May 1870.

[James Payn, Victorian novelist and journalist.] Autograph Signature ('James Payn') in response to request for autograph.

Author: 
James Payn (1830-1898), Victorian novelist and journalist, editor of Chambers's Journal in Edinburgh and the Cornhill Magazine in London
Publication details: 
28 March 1887.
£20.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, lightly aged. Strip of glue from tape at head of page. Written in response to a request for an autograph. Centred in the page, and reading: 'Yours truly | James Payn | March 28th 1887.'

[ London Press Club and James Nicol Dunn.] Presentation volume on Dunn's departure for South Africa during the Boer War, in luxury leather binding, with full-page calligraphic address by 'L.J.S.', signed by more than 150 Fleet Street figures.

Author: 
London Press Club [ James Nicol Dunn (1856-1919), editor of Morning Post; Harry Levy-Lawson, 1st Viscount Burnham (1862-1933), Fleet Street press baron; Harry Lawson, Lord Burnham; Hannen Swaffer ]
Publication details: 
[ The London Press Club. 1911. ]
£320.00

In a luxury binding: navy-blue straight-grain morocco covers, watered silk endpapers, internal gilt dentelles and leather hinges. Initial calligraphic address by 'L.J.S.' mounted in card frame, followed by 14pp.of signatures (numbering in excess of 150), on the rectos of 14 pieces of gilt-edged card. In good condition, with slight wear to corners and at head and tail of spine.

[ W. T. Stead, pioneering investigative journalist who died on RMS Titanic. ] Two Typed Letters Signed (both 'W. T. Stead') to G. G. Armstrong of the Northern Echo, one with long autograph postscript, regarding 'the German Editors' trip'.

Author: 
W. T. Stead [ William Thomas Stead ] (1849-1912), pioneering investigative journalist, editor of the Pall Mall Gazette and the Review of Reviews, died on RMS Titanic
Publication details: 
Both on letterheads of 'The Review of Reviews', London. 21 May and 13 June 1907.
£120.00

The two letters are accompanied by a carbon of a typed reply by Armstrong. Although complete and legible, all three items are in poor condition, with chipping and loss the heads and wear to the other extremities, and punch holes to margin. The recipient is G. G. Armstrong, editor fo the Northern Echo, Darlington. ONE: Stead to Armstrong. 21 May 1907. 1p., 4to. Stead is 'unutterably disgusted to know' that Armstrong has 'not received an invitation for the German Editors' trip'.

[ 'Mrs. George Wrottesley' [ Margaret Anne Wrottesley ], journalist and daughter of Sir John Fox Burgoyne. ] Autograph Letter in the third person to 'Mr Lacy' [ theatrical bookseller Thomas Hailes Lacy ], regarding copies of two plays.

Author: 
'Mrs George Wrottesley' [ Margaret Anne Wrottesley, nee Margaret Anne Burgoyne ] (c.1832-1883), journalist ('M. A. B.'), daughter of Sir John Fox Burgoyne [ Thomas Hailes Lacy, theatrical bookseller ]
Publication details: 
Wrottesley, Wolverhampton. 10 February 1864.
£45.00

See Mrs George Wrottesley's obituary in The Times, 10 May 1883, in which she is praised for 'her undaunted courage and unshaken endurance of difficulties displayed repeatedly during her father's mission to the East' in 1854. 1p., 12mo. In fair condition, lightly aged. The main body of the letter reads: 'Mrs. George Wrottesley will feel much obliged to Mr Lacy if he will send her a copy of the play of | "The Wonder" - | The address is to | The Honble. | Mrs. George Wrottesley | Wrottesley | Wolverhampton'. At the head of the letter she adds a query concerning 'the play of Donna Diana'.

[ 'Sarah Gainham' [ Rachel Ames ], novelist and journalist. ] Typed Letter Signed ('Sarah Gainham') to 'Miss Cond' [ Eileen M. Cond ], announcing the near-completion of the third novel in her 'Night Falls on the City' trilogy.

Author: 
'Sarah Gainham', pseudonym of Sarah Rachel Stainer Ames (1915-1999), British novelist and journalist, author of 'Night Falls on the City' (1967)
Publication details: 
On her cancelled letterhead, Am Platz 4, Vienna 13, Austria, 'as from: Trieste, Italy.' 22 May [ 1969 or 1970 ].
£35.00

1p., landscape 12mo. She thanks her for her 'kind note', is glad she enjoyed 'A Place in the Country', and is returning her bookplate 'signed as requested'. 'The third part of the trilogy will, I hope, be ready for publication next year. As yet it has no title, although nearing completion.' A Place in the Country was published in 1969, and the third volume in the trilogy, Private Worlds, in 1971. Apparently 'Eileen Cond was a book collector who sent out her bookplate to her favorite authors, many of whom signed and returned them to her.'

[ Edmund Yates. ] Autograph Note Signed ('Edmund Yates') to 'Benthall', formerly enclosing 'a slip' of printers' 'copy' of his own and George Augustus Sala' [npot present]s writing.

Author: 
Edmund Yates [ Edmund Hodgson Yates ] (1831-1894), Scottish journalist and author, friend of Charles Dickens, proprietor of The World newspaper
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Post Office. 7 March 1866.
£45.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, laid down on piece of card, with slight staining from the glue employed. The note reads: 'My dear Benthall. | I enclose what you wished for, a slip of Sala's “Copy”, and one of my own. They are both sufficiently grimy, having been through the printers' hands. | Sincerely your's [sic] | Edmund Yates'.

[ James Dredge Jr, civil engineer and co-editor of 'Engineering'. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('James Dredge') to 'Willy' [ presumably Stanhope Forbes of Newlyn's brother -see note below], condolences on death of his father, ruminating on mortality.

Author: 
James Dredge Jr (1840-1906), English civil engineer and co-editor with William H. Maw of the periodical 'Engineering'
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 'Engineering: An Illustrated Weekly Journal, Edited by William H. Maw and James Dredge', 35 & 36 Bedford Street, Strand, London, W.C. 8 December 1888.
£60.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. Letterhead in black and red ink. In fair condition, aged and worn, with creasing at head. A sensitive letter of condolence, beginning: 'Dear Willy | I was so shocked to hear on Thursday of the great loss you have sustained, and I hesitated to write to you, for letters of condolence are such empty useless things. But on the other hand I dont want you to suppose that I feel indifferent to anything that touches you so closely & deeply.

[ Sir Dawson Williams, editor of the British Medical Journal. ] Typed Letter Signed ('Dawson Williams') to 'Dr Milburn', regarding whether 'Dr Fred Wilson was suffering from the plague'.

Author: 
Sir Dawson Williams (1854-1928), editor of the British Medical Journal
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the British Medical Journal, 429 Strand, London, W.C. 25 January 1901.
£30.00

For information on Williams see his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p., landscape 12mo. The top half of a 4to leaf, the lower part having been torn away untidily, and with a closed tear repaired on reverse with archival tape. He thanks him for the trouble he has taken 'to obtain an answer to my inquiry. As it was not certain whether Dr Fred Wilson was suffering from plague or not, we thought it better to leave the matter indefinite.'

[ Shirley Brooks, the 'Epicurus Rotundus' of Punch. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('S. Brooks'), regarding the address of a club and 'Sir Rowland's myrmidons'.

Author: 
Shirley Brooks [ Charles William Shirley Brooks ] (1816-1874), journalist and novelist, the 'Epicurus Rotundus' of Punch
Publication details: 
9 Havelock Road, Hastings, on cancelled letterhead of 6 West Terrace, Regent's Park, N.W. [ London ] No date.
£45.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, aged and worn, with traces of mount on blank reverse. He is sending, 'as promised, the address', but has forgotten 'the exact member of the club'. 'I conclude, however, that it is well known to Sir Rowland's myrmidons' (Sir Rowland Hill and his postmen). He asks for 'a line of assurance', and for a proof if the recipient prints the address. A pencil postscript at the foot of the leaf has been neatly torn away, except for the following, up the right-hand margin: '<...> I have pencilled might be omitted. She can judge'.

[ St John Adcock, journalist, novelist and poet. ] Typed Letter Signed ('St. John Adcock') to J. Cuming Walters, on his health (a year before his death), work as editor of 'The Bookman', 'Collected Poems', and Cuming Walters's 'Charm of Lancashire'.

Author: 
St John Adcock [ Arthur St. John Adcock ] (1864-1930), poet, novelist and editor of 'The Bookman' [ J. Cuming Walters [ John Cuming Walters ] (1863-1933), editor of the Manchester City News ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 55 Queens Road, Richmond, Surrey. 3 November 1929.
£35.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. The first paragraph reads: 'Dear Cuming Walters, | Forgive me for not writing sooner. The fact is I have been down with influenza and pneumonia for the last three weeks. The worst time of the year for me! After the first week I contrived with difficulty to carry on with things, lying on my back dictating letters to my daughter, who has helped me enormously. But I am up again, and though not allowed out of doors have for the last four days been working in my room here, so shall manage all right and get my Christmas No.

[ George Julian Harney, Chartist and journalist. ] Two Autograph Letters Signed ('G. J. Harney' and 'G. Julian Harney') to the bookseller Bertram Dobell, assessing the character of George Augustus Sala, and bemoaning the state of his health.

Author: 
G. J. Harney [ George Julian Harney ] (1817-1897), Chartist and journalist [ Bertram Dobell (1842-1914), London bookseller and literary scholar; George Augustus Sala (1828-1895), journalist ]
Publication details: 
The first from 27 St Mary's Grove, Richmond-on-Thames, Surrey.,21 August 1895. The second with placve not stated, 12 September 1895.
£500.00

Dobell is not named, but the second letter contains a reference to the recipient's wife 'Mrs. Dobell'. Both letters 2pp., 12mo, and both in good condition, on lightly aged paper. ONE: 21 August 1895. Signed 'G. J. Harney.' He makes an order of books from the library of George Augustus Sala, of whom he 'cannot profess to be an admirer': 'clever, versatile, a typical journalist; but not of the stuff of Cobbett, Wooler, Hone (before he became a melancholy mad religious crank) or Hetherington – or Hunt (John).

[ Neville Bulwer-Lytton, 3rd Earl of Lytton, British military officer, Olympian and artist. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Neville Lytton') to Digby la Motte, describing the 'magnificent' appearance at a Bach concert of Sir Claude Phillips.

Author: 
Neville Bulwer-Lytton (1879-1951), 3rd Earl of Lytton, British military officer, Olympian (Real Tennis) and artist [ Sir Claude Phillips; Richard Alexander Streatfeild ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Crabbet Park, Poundhill, Crawley, Sussex. 18 March 1911.
£65.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper. He apologises for being unable to 'get out of' his 'other engagement' after his committee the following next Wednesday, and asks for 'another opportunity of coming to see you.' He continues: 'I saw Streatfield [sic] from afar the other night at Bach's mass in B. Minor. He was magnificent in evening dress next to Claude Phillips even more magnificent.' He concludes: 'I expect you Wednesday afternoon at Rossetti Studios, Flood St.

[ Tom Clarke, editor of the News Chronicle, as Director of Practical Journalism, University of London King's College. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Tom Clarke') to Morley Stuart of the Cambridge Daily News, regarding a student's 'vacation work'.

Author: 
Tom Clarke [ Thomas Clarke ], editor of the News Chronicle, and Director of Practical Journalism, University of London King's College [ Morley Stuart, editor, Cambridge Daily News ]
Publication details: 
On his letterhead, University of London King's College, Stand W.C.2. 27 April 1937.
£120.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, lightly aged, laid down on leaf removed from album. Clarke writes that a King's student, also named Clarke, whom Stuart took 'for vacation work', has returned 'full of enthusiasm & gratitude for all you & your people have taught him'. He only hopes that the student 'made as good an impression on you as you have done on him'. He concludes: 'Why don't you come and give the students a talk one day?' According to an official account: 'The University of London ran courses in journalism from around 1923.

[ Henry James Slack, abolitionist, journalist and science writer. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Henry J. Slack') to the antiquary Charles Roach Smith, regarding 'Miss Meteyard's book' and his 'new journal' the Intellectual Observer.

Author: 
Henry J. Slack [ Henry James Slack ], (1818-1896), abolitionist, English journalist, activist and science writer. [ Charles Roach Smith (1807-1890), antiquary; Eliza Meteyard (1816-1879), author ]
Publication details: 
34 Camden Square NW [ London ]. 26 March 1861.
£60.00

3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, lightly aged, with spotting at gutter. While his 'new Magazine [ the Intellectual Observer ] will not have space for reader of general Literature', he will do what he can 'for Miss Meteyard's book' (Eliza Meteyard published 'Give Bread, Gain Love' and 'The Delft Jug' in 1861]. He continues with reference to 'scientific questions' and 'our new magazine'.From 1862 Slack edited the Intellectual Observer, a development of a journal called Recreative Science, founded in 1859.

[ Edmund Yates, journalist and newspaper proprietor. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Edmund Yates.') to an unnamed recipient, assessing the character of the London publisher William Tinsley.

Author: 
Edmund Yates [ Edmund Hodgson Yates ] (1831-1894), Scottish journalist and author, friend of Charles Dickens, proprietor of The World newspaper [ William Tinsley (1831-1902), London publisher ]
Publication details: 
On embossed letterhead of the Post Office. 19 November 1868.
£50.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, lightly aged, with small closed tear unobtrusively repaired. Reads: 'Take the enclosed note to Mr. Tinsley, 18 Catherine Sreet, Strand, a very rough but thoroughly clever and enterprising publisher, and tell him what you require. If possible, I trust he will meet your views'. According to Yates's entry in the Oxford DNB: 'In 1867, after leaving Temple Bar, he edited a new monthly, Tinsley's Magazine, but fell out with the proprietor who believed Yates was overpaying contributors, including himself. His official salary was by now £520 p.a.

[ G. R. Sims, journalist and bon vivant. ] Autograph Card Signed ('GRS') to 'The Mac Finck', i.e. the composer Herman Finck, on the back of a postcard with an image of Sims himself.

Author: 
G. R. Sims [ George Robert Sims ] (1847-1922), journalist, author and bon vivant [ Herman Finck [ born Hermann Van Der Vinck ] (1872-1939), composer and conductor ]
Publication details: 
Postmark of 'LONDON N.W.' No date.
£35.00

Aged and worn postcard. Written in pencil, and addressed to 'The Mac Finck | 21 Heatherfield Pk | Willesden Green | NW'. Reads 'All right Sunny | See you soon. So busy. No time to Finck of ennyfinck for a week | Yours | GRS'. The image of 'MR. GEORGE ROBERT SIMS' on the front of the card shows a seated Sims pondering what to write with pen in hand and finger on cheek, seated surrounded by curios in what is probably his study. Finck's 'In the Shadows' was one of the last songs played while RMS TItanic went down.

[ Elizabeth Florence Sims, widow of journalist and bon vivant G. R. Sims. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('E. Florence. G R Sims'), a letter of condolence to the widow of composer Herman Finck.

Author: 
Elizabeth Florence Sims [ nee Wykes ] (b.1873), wife of journalist G. R. Sims [ George Robert Sims ] (1847-1922) [ Herman Finck [ born Hermann Van Der Vinck ] (1872-1939), composer ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Aysgarth, Norton, Stourbridge. 23 April 1939.
£25.00

3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. She is writing on behalf of herself and ''. Regarding Finck she says: 'He was always so kind, so full of human sympathy & suchj a dear Man - I feel I have lost a very dear & treasured friend - I think I must have known him over 40 years. My husband loved him & had great admiration for him as a man'. Finck's 'In the Shadows' was one of the last songs played as RMS Titanic went down.?>

[ Mrs Oliphant to her editor, Mrs. S. C. Hall. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('M O W Oliphant.') to 'Mrs. Hall', regarding the publication by her of a 'bit of a story', and the acquiring of postage stamps in 'primitive' Rosneath.

Author: 
Mrs Oliphant [ Margaret Oliphant Wilson Oliphant ] (1828-1897), Scottish novelist [ Anna Maria Hall [ née Fielding ] (1800-1881), author, wife of Samuel Carter Hall (1800-1889), journalist ]
Publication details: 
Willow-burn, Rosneath, Helensburgh. 25 June [1861?].
£50.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium with mourning border. On lightly aged and ruckled paper, with slight damage at head of gutter. The letter would appear to concern a contribution intended for 'The Juvenile Forget Me Not', the annual Mrs S. C. Hall began editing in the late 1820s. begins: 'My dear Mrs. Hall | I sent you the story or rather the bit of a story you have - because you asked for it. Therefore if you like it, the pay is not to be considered - But at the same time if you dont like it, pray dont think of using it out of courtesy.

[Cecil Harmsworth King, newspaper proprietor.] 103 Autograph Letters Signed and 22 Autograph Cards Signed to Philip Dossé, editor of 'Books and Bookmen', regarding his reviewing and other subjects. With a batch of letters from King's wife Ruth King.

Author: 
Cecil King [Cecil Harmsworth King] (1901-1987), chairman of Daily Mirror Newspapers and International Publishing Corporation; Dame Ruth Railton (1915–2001) [Philip Dossé, editor of Books and Bookmen]
Publication details: 
All but one of the 115 letters either from The Pavilion, Hampton Court, East Molesey, Surrey, or The Pavilion, Greenfield Park, Dublin. A few of the letters dated from between 1971 and 1979; the others from the same period.
£1,500.00

King's letters total 135pp., 12mo; 10pp., 4to. The earlier letters (mainly from East Molesey) all addressed to 'Mr Dossé'; 37 of the later letters (all from Dublin) addressed to 'Dear Philip'. The collection also contains the holograph of King's review of Graham Cleverley's 1976 book 'The Fleet Street Disaster' (6pp, foolscap 8vo), and 11 Autograph Letters Signed and three Autograph Cards Signed to Dossé from King's wife Ruth (neé Railton), dating from between 1971 and 1979. These are written in a chatty style, the letters totalling 25pp., 12mo; 2pp., 4to.

[ Christopher Morley. ] Typed Letter Signed to 'Mr Shorter' (the English journalist Clement Shorter), regarding a visit made by him and H. W. Massingham to Philadelphia, and his book 'The Haunted Bookshop'.

Author: 
Christopher Morley (1890-1957), American journalist and man of letters [ Clement Shorter (1857-1926) and H. W. Massingham [ Henry William Massingham ] (1860-1924), English journalists and authors ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Evening Ledger, Independence Square, Philadelphia. 'Saturday' [ 1919 ].
£200.00

1p., 4to. Aged and frayed. He is sending 'some cuttings for you and Mr Massingham'. As he only has one copy of 'the Sarazin essay' they 'will have to battle over it'. He apologises for is sorry that 'the managing editor had to cut down the little interview sadly for reasons of space, which are always embarrassing on a Saturday'. He expresses 'genuine delight' at having been able to show the two men 'some of our forlorn literary shrines', and compliments them on their 'perspicacity in spending four days in Phila.

[ George Grossmith, Victorian humourist. ] Dictated Letter, Signed ('Geo: Grossmith') with autograph postscript, to 'George R, &c.' [George R. Sims], describing their first meeting, and commenting warmly on their thirty-eight years of friendship.

Author: 
George Grossmith (1847-1912), humourist, author, actor and singer [ George R. Sims (1847-1922), journalist and bon vivant ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 55 Russell Square, W.C. [ London ] 22 June 1908.
£80.00

4pp., 12mo. Bifolium. Aged and stained, with creasing along one edge. A wonderful letter, linking two notable figures in late-Victorian society, beginning: 'Do I remember it? how can I ever forget it, considering that we introduced ourselves to each other, without any introduction; & that casual acquaintanceship has developed into a friendship (without a discordant note) which has lasted for about 38 years.' Regarding their first meeting he writes: 'I was not subpoenaed as a short hand writer, as no such functionary was engaged at Bow St.

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