MORLEY

[ Tom Clarke, editor of the News Chronicle, as Director of Practical Journalism, University of London King's College. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Tom Clarke') to Morley Stuart of the Cambridge Daily News, regarding a student's 'vacation work'.

Author: 
Tom Clarke [ Thomas Clarke ], editor of the News Chronicle, and Director of Practical Journalism, University of London King's College [ Morley Stuart, editor, Cambridge Daily News ]
Publication details: 
On his letterhead, University of London King's College, Stand W.C.2. 27 April 1937.
£120.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, lightly aged, laid down on leaf removed from album. Clarke writes that a King's student, also named Clarke, whom Stuart took 'for vacation work', has returned 'full of enthusiasm & gratitude for all you & your people have taught him'. He only hopes that the student 'made as good an impression on you as you have done on him'. He concludes: 'Why don't you come and give the students a talk one day?' According to an official account: 'The University of London ran courses in journalism from around 1923.

[ Captain William Pryce Cumby, hero of the Battle of Trafalgar. ] Two Autograph Letters Signed (both 'Wm: Pryce Cumby') to the London solicitor Thomas Wiglesworth, the first regarding a repaired chronometer, the second a power of attorney.

Author: 
Captain William Pryce Cumby (1771-1837), Royal Navy, hero of the Battle of Trafalgar while commanding HMS Bellerophon [ Thomas Wiglesworth, London solicitor ]
Publication details: 
Both letters from East Hall, Middleton Tyas [ Yorkshire ]. 23 February and 1 July 1819.
£350.00

Early on during the Battle of Trafalgar, Lieutenant Cumby's captain John Cooke was mortally wounded, leaving Cumby in command of HMS Bellerophon during 'the most glorious battle ever fought at sea'. According to John Marshall's 'Royal Naval Biography' (1823): 'At this early period of the battle, the Bellerophon was closely engaged with the Monarca, as well as l’Aigle, and exposed to a distant cannonade from three other of the enemy’s ships.

[ Christopher Morley. ] Typed Letter Signed to 'Mr Shorter' (the English journalist Clement Shorter), regarding a visit made by him and H. W. Massingham to Philadelphia, and his book 'The Haunted Bookshop'.

Author: 
Christopher Morley (1890-1957), American journalist and man of letters [ Clement Shorter (1857-1926) and H. W. Massingham [ Henry William Massingham ] (1860-1924), English journalists and authors ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Evening Ledger, Independence Square, Philadelphia. 'Saturday' [ 1919 ].
£200.00

1p., 4to. Aged and frayed. He is sending 'some cuttings for you and Mr Massingham'. As he only has one copy of 'the Sarazin essay' they 'will have to battle over it'. He apologises for is sorry that 'the managing editor had to cut down the little interview sadly for reasons of space, which are always embarrassing on a Saturday'. He expresses 'genuine delight' at having been able to show the two men 'some of our forlorn literary shrines', and compliments them on their 'perspicacity in spending four days in Phila.

[Female suffrage; printed pamphlet containing a speech by John Stuart Mill.] Report of a Meeting of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage, Held at the Gallery of the Architectural Society in Conduit Street, Saturday, July 17th, 1869.

Author: 
[London National Society for Women's Suffrage] [John Stuart Mill; Rev. Charles Kinglsey; Professor Henry Fawcett; Lord Houghton (Richard Monckton Milnes); John Morley; Professor David Masson]
Publication details: 
[London National Society for Women's Suffrage.] ['London: Printed by Spottiswoode and Co., New-street Square and Parliament Street'] [1869.]
£350.00

34pp., 8vo. Drophead title. Disbound, with front leaf loose, otherwise in good condition, lightly-aged, without wraps. Including a seven-page speech by John Stuart Mill (pp.7-13); a speech of three and a half pages by the Rev. Charles Kingsley (pp.14-17); and others by Mrs Taylor; Thomas Hare; Boyd Kinnear; Lord Houghton; John Morley; Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, P. A. Taylor; Professor Masson; Mr Stansfield. Three copies on COPAC, and none (other than surrogates) on OCLC WorldCat. No other copy curently on the market.

[Printed pamphlet.] [Drop-head title:] University College, London, 1828-1878. [A Lecture Introductory to the 51st. Session.]

Author: 
Henry Morley (1822-1894) [The Building Fund, University College, London, 1878; Lord Granville, Chancellor of the University of London]
Publication details: 
London: 'Printed by Taylor and Francis, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street.' Dated (p.31) 9 July 1878.
£120.00

32pp., 8vo. In brown makeshift wraps, with blue ribbon. No title leaf, and no indication of the author. The only information, apart from the drop-head title and printers' slug on last page, in manuscript on front wrap: 'University College | London | 1828-1878 | A Lecture Introductory to the | 51st. Session | by | Henry Morley | 1879.' In fair condition, on lightly aged paper. Label (of the Board of Education Reference Library) on front wrap.

[Col. C. Morley Knight, livestock breeder in Argentina.] Autograph Letter Signed ('C. Morley Knight') to C. E. Fagan, Secretary of the British Museum, commenting on Oliver Lodge and other trustees, and discussing the depression in Argentina.

Author: 
Col. C. Morley Knight [Captain Charles Lewis William Morley Knight] (1863-1937), livestock breeder in Argentina [Charles Edward Fagan (1855-1921), Secretary of the British Museum; Sir Oliver Lodge]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Knight & Porteous, 'La Maria Luisa', Bonifacio, F.C.S. [Buenos Aires, Argentina.] 21 October 1913.
£120.00

2pp., 8vo. In fair condition, on aged paper, with wear to extremities. He begins by discussing his own holiday, Fagan's and that of Porteous, before describing the weather on his trip to Argentina from England, with news of his plans ('I will try & get home for B.M. meeting 10th Janry.' Changing the subject, he writes: 'Hope you are getting to work in the Spirit room. It is a pity we cant have Oliver Lodge on the Sub Cttee. His address bored me & I think it most disappointing. I hoped for something much more exciting. It was only anti-cock-sure-Schafer.

Two Autograph Letters Signed (both 'Lee of Fareham') from Arthur Hamilton Lee, Viscount Lee of Fareham, to Morley Stuart, editor of the Cambridge Daily News, with reference to his 'old friend' the Marquess of Willingdon.

Author: 
Arthur Hamilton Lee (1868-1947), Viscount Lee of Fareham, soldier and politician [Freeman Freeman-Thomas, 1st Marquess of Willingdon (1866-1941), Viceroy of India; Morley Stuart; Cambridge Daily News]
Publication details: 
Both on letterhead of Old Quarries, Avening, Gloucestershire. 20 and 24 October 1940.
£90.00

Both items 2pp., 12mo. Both in good condition, on lightly-aged paper, with slight evidence of previous mounting. The first letter (addressed to 'The Editor | Cambridge Daily News') begins: 'When I received my L.L.D Degree from the University (in June 1931) you published in your issue of June 6, some photographs of the procession to the Senate House on that occasion.' He is writing 'on the off chance' that 'original prints' survive, 'as I am most anxious to obtain one, for my Autobiography, if it is in any way possible to do so'. In the second letter (to 'Mr.

Four Autograph Letters Signed (all 'C. Morley Knight.') from Captain Charles Morley Knight to Charles Edward Fagan (all 'Fagan'), Secretary of the British Museum, discussing Trustees (Sir Archibald Geikie; Lord Rosebery; Maryon-Wilson; Rothschild).

Author: 
Captain Charles Lewis William Morley Knight (1863-1937), livestock breeder in Argentina and Trustee of the British Museum [Charles Edward Fagan (1855-1921), Secretary of the British Museum]
Publication details: 
One on letterhead of the English Club, Bartolomé Mitre 478, Buenos Aires; 18 November 1910. The three others on letterhead of 11 Hesketh Crescent, Torquay, one of them from 1912 and the other two from 1913.
£220.00

All four items in very good condition, on lightly-aged paper. Totalling 16pp., 12mo. On four bifoliums. In addition to being one of the Trustees of the British Museum, Knight was, as one of the proprietors of Knight and Porteus of Argentina, owner with his partner Colonel John James Porteus (1857-1948) of 'the largest herd of red Aberdeen-Angus in the world' (TImes, 24 April 1939), which was sold after his death. ONE: On letterhead of the English Club, Buenos Aires. 18 November 1910. 4pp., 12mo. Docketed 'Wrote 20 Dec.

Two Autograph Letters Signed from J. P. S. Bicknell of Hoxton, as 'amanuensis' to the widow of the London bookseller Robert Greaves Ibbett, offering the Liberal MP Samuel Morley a manuscript and painting said to be of Dr Isaac Watts.

Author: 
J. P. S. Bicknell of Hoxton [Samuel Morley (1809-1886), businessman and Liberal MP for Bristol, 1868-1885; Robert Greaves Ibbett, London bookseller and picture dealer; Dr Isaac Watts (1674-1748)]
Publication details: 
Both letters from 24 Northport-street, St. John's Road, Hoxton [Hackney, London]. 8 July and 4 September 1874.
£130.00

Both items in good condition, on aged and lightly-creased paper. Both written in a close and somewhat shaky hand, and addressed to 'Respected Sir'. Letter One: 8 July 1874. 3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. Bicknell explains that the 'widow of a bookseller, (R. G. Ibbett, who, for many years, dealt in original and rare works, in the City of London,) has in her possession the Psalms and Hymns of Dr. Isaac Watts, in his own handwriting (bound). This MS. was shown (together with a well-executed oil-painting of the Doctor,) to the late Dr.

Autograph Letter Signed ('J Morley') from the politician John Morley to the National Liberal Federation secretary Francis Schnadhorst, rearranging meetings in the build-up to the 1885 General Election.

Author: 
John Morley (1838-1923), 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn, Liberal politician, writer and newspaper editor [Joseph Chamberlain (1836-1914); Francis Schnadhorst (1840-1900), Birmingham Liberal]
Autograph Letter Signed ('J Morley') from the politician John Morley
Publication details: 
Putney, on cancelled letterhead of Joseph Chamberlain's mansion Highbury, Moor Green, Birmingham; 2 September 1885.
£65.00
Autograph Letter Signed ('J Morley') from the politician John Morley

2 pp, 12mo. He is only in Putney for a day, and does not expect to be able to see Schnadhorst. Sir Charles Dilke 'says that Oct. 13 is fixed for Halifax, and that he is not sure that he may not be able to go there after all'. If this is so, 'it would be best to change my day at Newport from the 13th. October'. He will tell '', and would be grateful to Schnadhorst for arranging another day.

Typed Letter Signed from the Conservative Home Secretary Sir William Joynson-Hicks to Morley Stuart, editor of the 'Cambridge Daily News', on the subject of teetotalism and revolution.

Author: 
Sir William Joynson-Hicks [later 1st Viscount Brentford] (1865-1932), Conservative Party Home Secretary, 1924-1929 [Morley Stuart, editor of the 'Cambridge Daily News']
Sir William Joynson-Hicks
Publication details: 
17 February 1927; on letterhead of the Home Secretary, Whitehall, London.
£38.00
Sir William Joynson-Hicks

4to, 1 p. Eleven lines. Text clear and complete. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Laid down on a leaf removed from an album. Stuart has sent him copy from his newspaper, with the remark of some un-named clergyman that "Teetotalism, at any rate in hard times like these, is dangerously likely to help on unrest and revolution". Far from being the 'cause of revolution', teetotalism enables people, in Joynson-Hicks's view, 'to save money which they would otherwise spend on alcoholic liquor', and so 'helps them to acquire a stake in the country and so forces a real bulwark against revolution.'

Typed Letter Signed ('P. Morley Horder') to W. Perry, Secretary, Royal Society of Arts.

Author: 
Percy Richard Morley Horder (1870-1944), English architect
Publication details: 
3 March 1931; on letterhead 5 Arlington Street, St. James's.
£23.00

One page, 12mo. Very good; lightly creased with staple holes to one corner. 'I beg you to publish the letter which I have addressed to the Journal. There is no point in withholding it.' Horder, who designed Lloyd George's house, as well as Mallory Court and Greys, is, according to one authority, 'one of a group of early twentieth century architects who were highly influential in re-introducing the romantic vernacular styles of the Elizabethan period. Many of his homes were in the style of Edwin Lutyens, having gables, stone dressings, mullioned windows and inglenooks.'

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