BOW

[The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820; Arthur Thistlewood and Lord Liverpool.] Printed handbill: 'Conspiracy | A Particular Account of the Treasonable Plot formed, for the destruction of His Majesty's Ministers!!!'

Author: 
The Cato Street Conspiracy, 1820; Arthur Thistlewood (1774-1820); Lord Liverpool, Prime Minister
Publication details: 
Pollock, Printer, North Shields. No date [March 1820].
£1,200.00

For information regarding the conspiracy to murder Lord Liverpool and his entire cabinet, see Thistlewood's entry in the Oxford DNB. A rare item, with no other copy found either on OCLC WorldCat or on COPAC, and intended for distribution in the streets of the North-East of England as the sensational news of the Conspiracy broke. In small print apart from the heading (which is in the usual mixture for the period of typefaces and point sizes, with fancy rules), on one side of a 42 x 13 cm strip of laid paper.

['Johnson's Alamode Beef House': celebrated London eaterie associated with Charles Dickens.] Autograph Letter Signed from proprietor R. J. P. Jaquet, asking Sir Herbert Taylor to help with application to Bow Street magistrates Birnie and Minshull.

Author: 
'Johnson's Alamode Beef House', Drury Lane, London, Robert John Philip Jaquet, (1799-1867), proprietor [Sir Herbert Taylor (1775-1839); Sir Richard Birnie (c.1760-1832); Charles Dickens; Bow Street]
Publication details: 
21 Clare Court [Drury Lane, Covent Garden, London]; 2 March 1829.
£450.00

An interesting document relative to London social history, and a nice piece of Dickensiana. George Johnson is said to have established his celebrated restaurant Johnson's Alamode Beef House at 21 Clare Court, Drury Lane, in the 1780s, although the present letter states that it was licensed around 1805 . In 1824 a twelve-year-old Charles Dickens – employed in a nearby blacking warehouse as a result of his father's imprisionment for debt – himself experienced an incident which he later made use of in 'David Copperfield'.

[Robert Fulke Greville, Equerry to George III.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Robt: F: Greville') [to Richard Ford?], respecting the 'appointment on trial' of the Bow Street Runner William Anthony as a member of the king's retinue, stationed at Windsor.

Author: 
Lieut-Col. Robert Fulke Greville (1751-1824), Equerry to George III, 1781-1797, and MP [Richard Ford (1758-1806), London police magistrate; Bow Street Runners; Duke of Portland, Home Secretary]
Publication details: 
The Queen's Lodge [Windsor]. 1 April 1796.
£500.00

For the context of this letter see David J. Cox, 'A Certain Share of Low Cunning: A History of the Bow Street Runners, 1792-1839' (2010): 'From 1792 at least two Principal Officers were also permanently stationed at Windsor after the King had received several death threats.

[Robert Fulke Greville, Equerry to George III.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Robt: F: Greville.') [to Richard Ford?], respecting a seditious communication found in the town of Windsor, which he is forwarding to the Duke of Portland, Home Secretary.

Author: 
Lieut-Col. Robert Fulke Greville (1751-1824), Equerry to George III, 1781-1797, and MP [Richard Ford (1758-1806), London police magistrate; Bow Street Runners; Duke of Portland, Home Secretary]
Publication details: 
'The Queens Lodge Windsor | Saturday Janry. 9th: 1796.'
£500.00

The subject of the letter is clearly a seditious communication found in the Windsor area and brought to Greville's attention, which he is forwarding for the attention of the Home Secretary, the Duke of Portland. David J. Cox casts light on the context in his 'A Certain Share of Low Cunning: A History of the Bow Street Runners, 1792-1839' (2010), stating that from 1792 'at least two Principal Officers were also permanently stationed at Windsor after the King had received several death threats'.

[A.J. Kempe, antiquary] Autograph Letter Signed "A.J. Kempe" to John Gough Nichols, printer and antiquary.

Author: 
A.J. Kempe [Alfred John Kempe (1785?–1846)], antiquary.
Publication details: 
New Kent Road, [London], 5 Aug. 1831
£180.00

Three pages, 12mo, grubby, one or two letters obscured by marking, essentially readable as follows: He thanks him for "kind attention" and is ory "that you have had the trouble of sending a second time. I sent the MS. with a view of sparing you a second message by the hands of Mr. Bradley Sent. who was passing your House this afternoon. The Archery business shall be attended to when I return from my short excursion. I do not know the Book you mention but the 'Boweman's Glory' published by Waring of the Archery Warehouse near Bedford Square is an excellent compilation.

Autograph Letter Signed to 'Mr. Nunnez'.

Author: 
Elinor Glyn [born Elinor Sutherland] (1864-1943), English novelist
Publication details: 
15 March [docketed 1936]; on letterhead of 11 Connaught Place, London W.2.
£120.00

8vo, 2 pp. Very good. She has been recovering from influenza at Brighton. 'I think your Paper is going on Splendidly [last word underlined] & I am so glad! [last two words underlined]'. 'Yes, isnt Margaret Ettinger a charming Creature! She told me you had talked together of me'. Asks for Ettinger's address. 'How's the home? - how's the charming wife? - & when shall we discuss the affairs of the world, the flesh, & the devil?!' She is well, 'all but my knee, which has been behaving like an ungrateful child'.

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