SONG

[Baden-Powell writes to Rudyard Kipling about his poem 'The Scout's Patrol Song'.] Typed Letter Signed ('R S S Baden Powell') to Kipling, regarding 'publishing the Patrol song with music'.

Author: 
Robert Baden-Powell [Lieutenant-General Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell] (1857-1941), founder of the Boy Scouts Association and Girl Guides
Publication details: 
The Castle, Richmond, Yorkshire. 1 October 1909.
£650.00

The Kipling Society explains the background to this letter, which relates to a poem which Kipling had published a fortnight before (16 September 1909) in the London Standard as 'A Patrol Song', reprinting it two days later in The Scout as 'The Scout's Patrol Song'. The letter is 1p, 4to. In fair condition, folded four times, with patches of small holes at the head. The letter begins: 'My dear Rudyard Kipling, | Thank you so much for your letter. You did not enclose the two letters to which you refer, but I guess that they are from people desirous of publishing the Patrol song with music.

[Ballooning and Victorian Music Hall.] Anonymous Manuscript of the lyrics of two comic songs: 'Balooning [sic]' (inspired by a piece in Charles Dickens's 'Household Words') and Harry Sydney's 'It's just as well to take it in a quiet sort of way'.

Author: 
[Ballooning and Victorian Music Hall; Harry Sydney, music hall artiste and songwriter; Charles Dickens and 'Household Words']
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [London? Circa 1865.]
£400.00

3pp., foolscap 8vo. On a bifolium of laid paper. In fair condition, aged and worn. The first poem, 'Balooning [sic]', covers both sides of the first leaf. No evidence has been discovered that this poem was ever published, but it is inspired by the exploits of 'Mr. Green' in a humorous essay titled 'Ballooning', which appeared in Charles Dickens's 'Household Words' on 25 October 1851. The choice of two phrases ('pipes & backy' and 'Mounted Meershaums') is given in the present manuscript, these variants perhaps suggesting that this item is authorial rather than a transcription.

[Sabine Baring-Gould, antiquarian and folklorist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('S. Baring Gould') to 'Arthur' [his half-brother Arthur Baring-Gould, curate of St Peter's, Brixham], regarding Cecil Sharp's desire to 'tap your fishermen for songs'.

Author: 
Sabine Baring-Gould (1834-1924), antiquarian, folklorist and Anglican priest [his half-brother Arthur Baring-Gould (c.1865-1955), curate of St Peter’s, Brixham; Cecil Sharp (1859-1924)]
Publication details: 
Lew Trenchard, N. Devon. 10 August 1904.
£60.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged.; Written in a close, difficult hand. The letter begins: 'My dear Arthur | Cecil Sharp of the Conservatoire Hampstead is with me, & would much like to run to Brixham on Saturday & tap your fishermen for songs. He will stay over to Monday.' The final two sentences are not entirely legible. Having been a barrister before entering the church, Arthur Baring-Gould served as chaplain at Parkhurst and Dartmoor prisons.

[ Julius Harrison, English composer, inscribes a work to Sir Courtenay Mansel. ] Copy of the printed sheet music of 'To Chloe | Song for Voice and Pianoforte | Poem by Thomas Moore | Music by Julius Harrison'.

Author: 
Julius Harrison [ Julius Allan Greenway Harrison ] (1885-1963), English composer [ Thomas Moore (1779-1852), Irish poet ]
Publication details: 
Printed score published by Enoch & Sons (in 'The Enoch Art Song Library'), London. Dated 'June 1920' Harrison's autograph inscription dated 26 October 1920.
£45.00

4pp., 4to. Bifolium. Aged and creased, with chipping and closed tears to edges. Engraved title-page states that the work is 'Copyright 2/- net | No. 1 Low Voice | No. 2 Medium Voice'. Inscribed at top left-hand corner of title-page: 'To my friend Sir Courtenay Mansel with kindest regards from | Julius Harrison | Oct. 26th. 1920'. Moore's poem is printed on the reverse of the first leaf, and facing it, on the recto of the second leaf, is the score. On the reverse of the second leaf is a 'Revised List' of 'The Enoch Art Song Library', with the date of issue ('June, 1920.') at bottom left.

[ Thomas Hood, English poet. ] Autograph Note Signed ('T. Hood.'): a joke on the name 'Furlong' and 'A mile of daughters'.

Author: 
Thomas Hood (1799-1845), English poet, author of 'The Song of the Shirt' and 'The Bridge of Sighs', member of John Scott's 'London Magazine' circle
Publication details: 
Place and date not stated.
£35.00

On one side of a 6 x 11.5 cm slip of grey paper. In good condition, lightly aged, with small strip of glue staining along right-hand edge. Reads: 'A mile of daughters - | Family of Furlongs having 8 girls | 8 furlongs = 1 mile. - | T. Hood.' A joke on the surname of the person who requested Hood's autograph, as explained in Walter Jerrold's 'Thomas Hood, his Life and Times' (1907), which states that in 1838 Hood wrote to his friend Wright: '[…] only think of a mile of daughters! There is a family of Furlongs coming to live here, whereof eight are daughters – 8 furlongs = 1 mile.'

[Radio Series; corrected typescript ] "Song Writers on Parade" No. IV - Herman Finck

Author: 
[ Herman Finck, composer and conductor ]
Publication details: 
National Empire, 8 June 1934
£180.00

Script, titlepage plus 6pp., folio, folded, very good condition. Converstaional interchange between "Announcer" and Herman Finck with background (and foreground) of Finck's songs, starting with "In the Shadows" and with Finck giving the history of the song. Finck "asks" John Rorke to sing 'The Constant Lover@ and teslls a story about the revue, Then comes Rorke singing "Gilbert the Filbert" with Finck narrative, followed by anecdote about soldiers singing one of his songs. Betty Huntley-Wright then sings "To Make a Man of you".

Autograph Letter Signed from John Coates to Miss Hood, explaining why he could not sing the song 'Nancy's Hair' at Preston.

Author: 
John Coates (1865-1941), leading English tenor
Publication details: 
On letterhead of [11] Beaufort House, Chelsea, SW3 [London]. 26 January 1925.
£65.00

2pp., 4to. In good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. He writes that he is sorry that he could not sing the song 'Nancy's Hair' at Preston. He had not brought it: '(I only got your letter on arrival at the concert hall.) Funnily enough I picked it up before leaving home to put in my case as a possible encore & then put it back.' He is 'delighted to know that your mother liked my singing of it, I most certainly enjoy singing it & I hope to be able to help it along'.

Programme and songsheet by Arnold Riches for 'Ridgeway's Late Joys (formerly Evans' Song and Supper Rooms)', with Leonard Sachs as chairman, and featuring Peter Ustinov, Bernard Miles and 'Alec (Laneworthy-Figg) Clunes'.

Author: 
Ridgeway's Late Joys (Formerly Evans' Song and Supper Rooms), Players Theatre [Peter Ridgeway (c.1894-1938); Leonard Sachs; Arnold Riches; Peter Ustinov; Bernard Miles; Alec Clunes]
Publication details: 
Song sheet: Player's Theatre, 42, King Street, Covent Garden; undated [pre 1940]. Programme: Player's Theatre ('Late of COVENT GARDEN'), 13, Albemarle Street, Piccadilly; 1 November 1943.
£85.00

Both items printed on pink paper, with similar cover designs by Arnold Riches. Both in fair condition, aged and worn. The song sheet is a bifolium, 4pp, 4to, It dates from before 1939, when, following Ridgeway's death, the Player's Theatre moved to the Arts Theatre from King Street. The front page advertises performances 'Every Night (Except Sundays)', with 'THE ARTISTES' listed over twelve lines, and including 'Alec (Laneworthy-Figg) Clunes', Peter Ustinov, Bernard Miles and 'Leonard Sachs (Chairman)'.

[Handbill; verse] Colored Cavalier

Author: 
[H. de Marsan, publisher & bookseller; E.A. Sparks, illustrator]
Colored Cavalier
Publication details: 
H. de Marsan, Songs, Ballads, toy books. 60 Chatham St, NY. "Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by H. DE MARSAN [...] Clerk's Office [...] for the Southern Dustrict of New York".
£320.00
Colored Cavalier

Handbill, one page, crudely coloured border with images of a black troubadour with banjo[?] , a native American, and a trapper [?], 26 x 17cm, three stanzas each eight lines plus chorus, edges chipped, laid down on a larger page. Commences, "Oh! listen a while., a story I will tell; | It will please you to death, I know berry well [...]" Decorative border signed "E A Sparks" ("Printed within colored pictorial border (De Marsan trapper border J, in Wolf, E. Amer. song sheets)." One copy of this imprint listed by WorldCat, two of another imprint (later).

Manuscript of the United States Corps of Cadets anthem 'Benny Havens, Oh!', dated 'As sung by the U.S. Corps Cadets | 1864'. With explanatory introduction in manuscript, and with the '22nd. verse written at the beginning of the [American Civil] war'.

Author: 
Lieutenant Lucius O'Brien; Ripley Allen Arnold (1817-1853) [Corps of Cadets, United States Military Academy, West Point; Benny Havens (c.1787-1877)]
Publication details: 
[On West Point letterheads?] 1864.
£250.00

8pp., 12mo. On four bifoliums, placed inside one another to make a booklet. Each bifolium with embossed [West Point?] letterhead of a letter 'W' within a shield. A fair copy, with the title reading: 'Benny Havens, Oh! | as sung | by the | U.S. Corps Cadets - | 1864.' The twenty-two line introduction covers the whole of the second page.

Corrected galley proof of nonsense poem by 'M. S.' [the Faber & Faber production manager Montague Shaw?] entitled 'Cowkeeper's Tune'.

Author: 
[Montague Shaw, production manager, Faber & Faber Ltd]
Montague Shaw, production manager, Faber & Faber Ltd
Publication details: 
[Undated. London: Faber & Faber, 1950s?]
£50.00
Montague Shaw, production manager, Faber & Faber Ltd

The text area is about 13.5 x 30 cm, on the top half of a slip of paper around twice as long. Text clear and complete. Good, on lightly-aged paper. The lower half of the slip is blank apart from the pagination 196. Headed 'EPILOGUE | COWKEEPER'S TUNE', and beginning 'Unless your window is fitted with very strong iron bars and, just to make sure, your window locks, | Do not attempt to keep a Dexter cow in your window box.' Signed in type at end 'M.

Illustrated handbill poem, a street ballad entitled 'A New Song, entitled, Dear Peggy.'

Author: 
[Victorian London street ballad; broadsheet; handbill; death]
Publication details: 
Date and publisher not stated. [London; circa 1840?]
£38.00

Printed on one side of a piece of wove paper roughly 230 x 90 mm. On pitted, aged paper. Text complete. Approximate 30 x 50 mm piece torn away from top right-hand corner, causing loss to small illustration at head, which appears to be a crude woodcut of a woman lying in a coffin. The poem consists of thirty-six lines arranged in five stanzas. The first stanza reads 'Dear Peggy, read this letter, | its the last one I'll send, | Our long correspondence, | is now at an end.

Illustrated poem, a street ballad entitled 'The Wheel of Fortune'.

Author: 
[Victorian street ballad; broadsheet; handbill; death; nineteenth-century folk song]
Publication details: 
Date [circa 1840?] and publisher not stated.
£56.00

On one side of a piece of thin wove paper, roughly 260 x 95 mm. Aged and creased, with internal 25 mm closed tear affecting four words of text (all of which can be completed from the context) repaired on blank reverse with archival tape. Otherwise text and illustration clear and entire. Small (30 x 40 mm) woodcut at head, showing two early nineteenth-century country coves outside a cottage. The poem consists of ten four-line stanzas.

Illustrated Victorian handbill poem, a street ballad entitled 'The Golden Glove.'

Author: 
[Victorian street ballad; handbill poem; street ballad; broadsheet; nineteenth-century folk song]
Publication details: 
Publisher and date not stated. [Circa 1840?]
£56.00

Printed on one side of a piece of wove paper roughly 280 x 95 mm. Aged, creased and spotted, with chipping to extremities, but with text and illustration clear and entire. Curious small (roughly 40 x 65 mm) crude illustration at head, showing dove with olive branch and acorn. Forty-line poem arranged in five stanzas. Interestingly-garbled nineteenth-century folk song with ancient antecedents.

Autograph Signature.

Author: 
Noel Coward (Sir Noel Pierce Coward, 1899-1973), English actor, playwright and song writer
Publication details: 
Date and place not stated.
£35.00

On leaf of light blue paper, 8.5 x 12 cm, removed from an autograph album. Very good.

Autograph Letter Signed to the poet, journalist and editor Alaric A[lexander]. Watts (1797-1864).

Author: 
Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797-1839), English poet and song writer.
Publication details: 
Friday [no date]; 5 Wyndham Place, London.
£56.00

Two pages, quarto. Very good, on lightly aged and creased paper. He is sorry that he has not been able to 'become personally acquainted with' Watts since coming to town, but will 'very soon make another attempt', hoping to find him at home.

Autograph Letter Signed to 'My dear Mundy'.

Author: 
Theodore Byard, singer and director of the London publishers Heinemann Ltd
Publication details: 
Without date; on letterhead '13, CLARGES STREET, | PICCADILLY.'
£38.00

Three pages, 12mo. Good, but on slightly discoloured paper, and with head of blank verso of second leaf of bifolium attached to piece of grey paper. He cannot sing for Mundy on the 8th, as he is giving his own concert the following day, and has 'only just started at it as the Prince of Wales who has kindly consented to come, only let me know the date yesterday. You know what giving a concert means. I musts have the 8th. absolutely free. I am so sorry to disappoint you.'

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