[R. H. Naylor, astrologer.] Typed Signed Horoscope of President Roosevelt, with letter to John Gordon, editor of the Sunday Express, reporting 'queer indications therein'. With typed copy of report of Naylor's 1936 trial, brought by Maurice Barbanell

R. H. Naylor [Richard Harold Naylor] (1889-1952), Britain's first newspaper astrologer [John Rutherford Gordon (1890-1974), editor of the London 'Daily Express'; Maurice Barbanell (1902-1982)]
Publication details: 
Letter from Naylor to Gordon: On his letterhead, 43 Museum Street, London, WC1. 21 January 1941. Horoscope dating from a round the same time. Report of trial undated [March 1936].

Three items from the papers of John Gordon, editor of the Daily Express. The first two in good condition, lightly aged and creased; the third creased and torn, with slight loss to text. ONE: Typed Letter Signed ('R. H. N.') from Naylor to Gordon. 1p., 12mo. Headed 'Confidential'. He writes: 'Having drawn up an Astrological Chart for the time of the official inauguration of Roosevelt's Third Term I find some queer indications there. To me they are tremendously interesting and as I think you might find them interesting too I am sending you a copy of the notes I have filed.

[Hannen Swaffer and Walter Macqueen-Pope.] Collection relating to an abortive collaborative attempt at a 'biography' of Swaffer for Odhams Press, with drafts of chapters (with anecdotes on Churchill, H. G. Wells, Lloyd George) and original letters.

Hannen Swaffer (1879-1962), doyen of English journalists, known as 'The Pope of Fleet Street'; Walter Macqueen-Pope (1888-1960), theatre manager and historian [Odhams Press; Maurice Barbanell]
Publication details: 
[London: 1955.]

In very good condition, on aged paper, in a brown card folder. The material in this collection relates to a book that was never published, and included here are copies of two typed letters from WMP to HS, casting light on the nature of this doomed collaborative project. In WMP's first letter, dated 26 July 1955, he writes to 'Dear Swaff' to 'finalise the manner in which your book is to be written'. Presaging future problems he urges him: 'I do entreat you to remember the fact that a book is different to a series of paragraphs. It must have cohesion.

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