GOODWIN

[ Maxine Elliott, American actress. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Maxine Elliott Goodwin') to 'M. Munday', regarding a forthcoming to her English country mansion, Jackwood House in Kent.

Author: 
Maxine Elliott (1868-1940), American actress and businesswoman, wife of comedian Nathaniel Carl Goodwin (1857-1919) [ Jackwood House, Shooters Hill, Kent ] (see Wikipedia)
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Stenton, Philadelphia. 26 April 1898.
£120.00

2pp., 8vo. In fair condition, on aged paper. She begins by thanking him for his 'altogether charming letter', before explaining that she and her husband 'expect to be in England about the middle of June if we escape capture by the Spaniards in [ Spanish-American War being waged ] and shall hope for the pleasure of welcoming you to "Jackwood" often'. She ends by sending her regards, along with those of 'Nat and the small sister'. The 'small sister' was Gertrude, and Jackwood was the Goodwins' mansion in Kent.?>

[Mason Pottery [later Mason, Cash & Co. Ltd], Church Gresley, Derbyshire.] Informations and Complaints of Joseph Walker Bourne, proprietor of the pottery, against an apprentice and a 'handler', signed by Sir Oswald Mosley, his son, Bourne and others.

Author: 
Joseph Walker Bourne (1800-1840), potter, proprietor of the Mason Pottery [Mason, Cash & Co.], Church Gresley, Derbyshire; Sir Oswald Mosley (1785-1871), 2nd Baronet [Thomas Mellor; John Sherratt]
Publication details: 
County of Derby [Derbyshire]. 27 October and 1 November 1830.
£120.00

2pp., 8vo. In fair condition, on lightly aged and worn paper, with slight damage to one corner. At the head of the first page is a printed form (manuscript additions in square brackets): 'County of [Derby.] The Information and Complaint of [Joseph Walker Bourne] of [Church Gresley] in the said County [Potter] taken upon Oath before [me one] of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, the [27th] day of [October] 18[30]'. Written out by the magistrate Sir Oswald Mosley, 2nd Baronet (1785-1871), and signed by him ('Oswald Mosley'), his son 'Oswd Mosley Junr' (1804-1856), 'Joseph.

[Printed handbill.] The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen. [Numb. 3.] [Regarding the victory of the Duke of Marlborough at Ramillies.]

Author: 
John Smith, Speaker, House of Commons [Queen Anne; Jacob Tonson; Timothy Goodwin; the Duke of Marlborough; the Battle of Ramillies, 1706]
The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen. [Numb. 3.]
Publication details: 
London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, within Grays-Inn Gate next Grays-Inn Lane; and Timothy Goodwin, at the Queen's-Head against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleetstreet. 1706.
£56.00
The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen. [Numb. 3.]

8vo, 1 p. Text clear and complete. Blank reverse. Fair, on aged paper. Paginated 9, with 'Numb. 3.' in the top right-hand corner. Returning thanks for the 'speech from the throne', and for Marlborough's victory at Ramillies, 'A Victory so Glorious and Great in its Consequences, and attended with such Continued Successses, through the whole Course of this Year, that no Age can Equal.' Tonson's and Goodwin's appointment, by Smith, is signed in type.

[Printed handbill.] The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen. [Numb. 96.] [Regarding 'the French King's persisting to Invade'.]

Author: 
John Smith, Speaker, House of Commons [Queen Anne; Jacob Tonson; Timothy Goodwin]
The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen.
Publication details: 
London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, within Grays-Gate next Grays-Inn Lane; and Timothy Goodwin, at the Queen's-Head against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleetstreet. 1707.
£56.00
The Humble Address of the House of Commons to the Queen.

8vo, 1 p. Text clear and complete. Blank reverse. Fair, on aged paper. Paginated 205, with 'Numb. 96' in the top right-hand corner. In small type. Returning thanks for the speech from the throne, giving 'the Account of the French King's persisting to Invade Your Dominions, and to Impose a Pretender upon these Realms'. Calling for, among other things, 'the severest Punishments' to be 'inflicted upon such as shall Assist in so Unnatural a Design, as that of Betraying Your Majesty and their Country'. Tonson's and Goodwin's appointment, by Smith, is signed in type.

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