PITTS

Printed satirical handbill, written in apocalyptic style in prose and verse, on an engraving of 'The Peoples Frend & Hed-Vo-Cate' (i.e. The People's Friend and Advocate), one of the 'intended Inhabitants' of Pandaemonium.

Author: 
[SatirIcal Georgian handbill, satirising 'The Peoples Frend & Hed-Vo-Cate' [i.e. 'The People's Friend and Advocate']]
Georgian satire
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [British; 1820s?]
£280.00
Georgian satire

1p., 12mo. On 24.5 x 18.5 cm. piece of thin wove paper. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper with damage to extremities. A scarce and intriguing survival, about which nothing has hitherto been discovered. Printed in heavy black type characteristic of the early nineteenth century.

Handbill poem, with illustration, entitled 'Doodle, Doodle, Doo. A New Love Song in the Court Stile.'

Author: 
John Pitts, ballad printer of Seven Dials [Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany; Mary Anne Clarke (1776-1852)]
Publication details: 
Printed and Sold by J. Pitts, No. 14. Great Saint Andrew Street Seven Dials,'
£100.00

Printed on one side of a piece of rough laid paper, approximately 24.5 x 8.5 cm. Crude circular woodcut of pedlar at head, diameter 3.5 cm. Good, on aged paper with a little creasing at head and foot. Consists of four four-line stanzas with refrain 'Doodle, doodle, doo.' First stanza, heavy with double-entendre, reads 'HEAV'N bless my dearest little dear, | The wind is not quite fair, | From Portland Road I write this here - | Oh! bless your little hair. | Doodle, doodle, doo.' Clearly refers to a high society Regency scandal, possibly that concerning the Duke of York and Mary Anne Clarke.

Handbill poem, with illustration, entitled 'A Parody on Mr. Clarke.'

Author: 
John Pitts, ballad seller of Seven Dials [Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany; Mary Anne Clarke (1776-1852)]
Publication details: 
[circa 1809] 'printed and sold by J. Pitts, No. 14, Gre<at> St. Andrew-street, Seven-Dials.
£100.00

Printed on one side of a piece of rough wove paper, 25 x 9 cm. At the head is a crude woodcut of lady playing keyboard, dimensions 2 x 3 cm. On aged, creased paper with wear to extremities. Text clear and entire, but not properly centred, with the result that the last two letters of the word 'Gre' in the address cropped. The poem consists of six stanzas of six lines each. First stanza 'YOU have heard of Mrs.

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