SELLER

Autograph Letter Signed ('W. Fawkes') from the Yorkshire MP Walter Fawkes to the London cartographer and map seller William Faden, sending good wishes on his retirement, and requesting maps for his 'beautiful collection' from his successor.

Publication details: 
'Farnley. Tuesday.' [Farnley Hall, Yorkshire. 1824.]
£60.00

1p., 4to. Bifolium, with address ('Mr. Faden. Charing Cross. London'.) on reverse of second leaf, from which the seal has been cut away. He begins by informing Faden that his servant will call to pay his bill. 'I wish you would desire Mr. Wyld [James Wyld the elder (1790-1836)] your successor to send me the largest & best maps extant of Sweden, Norway & Lapland - maps I want in my otherwise beautiful collection very much'. He also enquires after 'Walker's new Map of India 16s', and a 'new map of Ceylon - where my eldest daughter is gone - as the Governor Sr. Edward Barnes' wife -'.

Autograph Letter Signed, in the third person, from Lord Churchill to the cartographer William Faden

Author: 
Francis Almeric Spencer (1779-1845), 1st Baron Churchill of Whichwood [Lord Churchill] [William Faden (1750-1836), cartographer and map seller, Charing Cross, London]
Autograph Letter Signed, in the third person, from Lord Churchill
Publication details: 
31 December 1826; Wychwood Forest, Witney, Oxfordshire.
£65.00
Autograph Letter Signed, in the third person, from Lord Churchill

12mo, 2 pp. Nine lines. Text clear and complete. Addressed by Churchill on reverse of the second leaf, with red wax seal, and his frank: 'Witney Dec. thirty one 1826. | Mr. Faden | Map Seller | Charing Cross | London. | [signed] Churchill'. On aged and lightly-creased paper, with a spike hole. Asking Faden to 'send him a small Case map of Gloucestershire, as soon as possible', directed to him by 'Pratt's Gloucester Coach, to be left at Witney'.

Handbill poem, entitled 'The Regency, A New Song in Honour of His Majesty and the Prince of Wales. Tune - "Hearts of Oak." '

Author: 
G. M'Ardell, printer, Newcastle-street, Strand [the madness of King George III; King George IV; the Prince Regent]
Publication details: 
[Undated, but between 1810 and 1820.] London: Printed by G. M'Ardell, Newcastle-street, Strand.
£120.00

Printed on one side of a piece of rough wove paper, approximately 24 x 10.5 cm. Text clear and entire on aged, creased paper. A production in favour of the Prince Regent, with no trace of sarcasm apparent. Consists of six four-line stanzas, each followed by the chorus 'Hearts of Oak, &c.' First stanza reads 'Come cheer up my lads, we'll no longer repine, | United, we'll triumph - OUR CAUSE is divine!

Handbill poem, with illustration, entitled 'Doodle, Doodle, Doo. A New Love Song in the Court Stile.'

Author: 
John Pitts, ballad printer of Seven Dials [Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany; Mary Anne Clarke (1776-1852)]
Publication details: 
Printed and Sold by J. Pitts, No. 14. Great Saint Andrew Street Seven Dials,'
£100.00

Printed on one side of a piece of rough laid paper, approximately 24.5 x 8.5 cm. Crude circular woodcut of pedlar at head, diameter 3.5 cm. Good, on aged paper with a little creasing at head and foot. Consists of four four-line stanzas with refrain 'Doodle, doodle, doo.' First stanza, heavy with double-entendre, reads 'HEAV'N bless my dearest little dear, | The wind is not quite fair, | From Portland Road I write this here - | Oh! bless your little hair. | Doodle, doodle, doo.' Clearly refers to a high society Regency scandal, possibly that concerning the Duke of York and Mary Anne Clarke.

Handbill poem, with illustration, entitled 'A Parody on Mr. Clarke.'

Author: 
John Pitts, ballad seller of Seven Dials [Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany; Mary Anne Clarke (1776-1852)]
Publication details: 
[circa 1809] 'printed and sold by J. Pitts, No. 14, Gre<at> St. Andrew-street, Seven-Dials.
£100.00

Printed on one side of a piece of rough wove paper, 25 x 9 cm. At the head is a crude woodcut of lady playing keyboard, dimensions 2 x 3 cm. On aged, creased paper with wear to extremities. Text clear and entire, but not properly centred, with the result that the last two letters of the word 'Gre' in the address cropped. The poem consists of six stanzas of six lines each. First stanza 'YOU have heard of Mrs.

Autograph Letter in the third person to the London printseller James Caulfield (1764-1826).

Author: 
Thomas Coutts (1735-1822), London banker of Scottish extraction [Coutts & Co.]
Publication details: 
23 January 1817; Strand.
£38.00

12mo: 1 p. Somewjhhat grubby, but with text clear and entire. Caulfield 'has been misled in supposing Mr Coutts is inclined to collect Hogarth's or any other pictures as he has hardly ever had any taste or inclination for that Line.'

Steel engraving by de Mare, after drawing by Rochussen, printed by Brugman, of 'Eene Dames Kunstbeschouwing in de Kunstzaal der Maatschappij: "Arti et Amicitiae."

Author: 
Charles Rochussen (1814-94), Dutch painter; Johannes de Mare, Dutch engraver; J. F. Brugman, Dutch printer
Publication details: 
[Amsterdam: circa 1880?]
£75.00

Paper dimensions roughly ten and a half inches by eleven and a half; print dimensions eight and a half inches by ten and a half. Aged and with three inch strip, roughly half an inch wide, torn away from surface of print in top left-hand corner. Depicts a crowded and rather grand hall, containing a long horseshoe-shaped table around which are crowded connoisseurs of both sexes contemplating engravings and illustrated books or engaged in discussion. Arti et Amicitiae is an Amsterdam society of artists and art lovers, founded in 1839.

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