BOWER

[ Philip Ridgeway, theatrical producer. ] Typed synopsis of unpublished autobiography, with autograph emendations, discussing his dramatisations of Thomas Hardy, London Chekhov productions (with Komisarjevsky); touring revues; BBC and war work.

Author: 
PhIlip Ridgeway (1891-1954), theatrical producer, broadcaster, radio entertainment producer [ Theodore Komisarjevsky; Thomas Hardy; Charles Laughton ]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. Written after the Second World War.
£320.00

6pp (the first three in folio, the last three in 4to), with an additional slip of paper from a seventh page. Each page on a separate leaf, all of them stapled together. In fair condition, aged and with slight ruckling and damp spotting to first leaf. Minor autograph emendations and additions throughout. It is puzzling that more information is not available concerning Ridgeway's eventful career, for which see his obituary in The Times, 28 October 1954. The present document is unsigned and untitled, and is clearly a draft synopsis of a proposal for an autobiography.

Typed Letter Signed ('Wyndham. A. Bewes') from the jurist Wyndham Austis Bewes to the British colonial official Sir Graham Bower, regarding a conference at Oxford and the German jurist Walter Simons, and complaining of 'the terrible time'.

Author: 
Wyndham Austis Bewes (1857-1942) of the Grotius Society and International Law Association [Sir Graham John Bower (1848-1933), British colonial official in South Africa; Walter Simons (1861-1937)]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the International Law Association, 2 King's Bench Walk, The Temple [London]. 7 June 1932.
£65.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. Addressing Bower as 'My dear Sir Graham', Bewes begins: 'Considering the terrible times that we are passing through and which I see are so badly affecting you, I think you are too generous in sending a contribution fitting for halcyon days.' After a reference to Bower's bronchitis, he discusses the conference at Oxford, concluding: 'The German members who have already accepted are few for conditions there are frightful. Simons [the German jurist Walter Simons] is taking a kur [sic] and writes that he is not sure to come.

Typed Letter Signed ('Wyndham. A. Bewes') from the jurist Wyndham Austis Bewes to the British colonial official Sir Graham Bower, regarding a conference at Oxford and the German jurist Walter Simons, and complaining of 'the terrible time'.

Author: 
Wyndham Austis Bewes (1857-1942) of the Grotius Society and International Law Association [Sir Graham John Bower (1848-1933), British colonial official in South Africa; Walter Simons (1861-1937)]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the International Law Association, 2 King's Bench Walk, The Temple [London]. 7 June 1932.
£65.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. Addressing Bower as 'My dear Sir Graham', Bewes begins: 'Considering the terrible times that we are passing through and which I see are so badly affecting you, I think you are too generous in sending a contribution fitting for halcyon days.' After a reference to Bower's bronchitis, he discusses the conference at Oxford, concluding: 'The German members who have already accepted are few for conditions there are frightful. Simons [the German jurist Walter Simons] is taking a kur [sic] and writes that he is not sure to come. PRIVATE.

[Printed pamphlet in defence of the British House of Lords.] Civilisation and the Constitution. A Catechism.

Author: 
Graham Bower [Sir Graham John Bower, RN] (1848-1933), Irish-born British colonial official, Imperial Secretary to High Commissioners for Southern Africa, 1884-1897 [Parliament; House of Lords]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [South Africa, 1880s or 1890s.]
£120.00

2pp., 4to. On the rectos of the two leaves of a bifolium. Signed in type at end 'GRAHAM BOWER.' On laid paper with 'SOUTHERN CROSS | FINE QUALITY' watermark, suggesting, with the typographic style, that it was written during the period of that he served as Imperial Secretary. Very good, on lightly aged and creased paper.

Autograph Letter Signed ('E. F. H. McSwiney') from Col. Edward Frederick Henry McSwiney of the Intelligence Division, War Office, condoling with Sir Graham Bower on his brother Denis's death, discussing 'revolver accidents' on the North-West Frontier

Author: 
Col. Edward Frederick Henry McSwiney (1858-1907), DSO, Colonel on the Staff, Ambala Cavalry Brigade, from 1906
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Intelligence Division, 18 Queen Anne's Gate, S.W. [London]. 21 June 1898.
£160.00

4pp., 4to. Bifolium. Very good, on aged paper. In a letter clearly written to dispel any suspicion of suicide, McSwiney begins: 'My dear Bower | I write to offer you mhy sincerest sympathy on the death of your brother Denis, which occurred through the accidental discharge of his revolver that he had taken up to unload prior to packing it up - he was to have started from Peshawar that very day to rejoin his regiment en route to England on a year's well earned furlo', which he had been looking forward to with so much delight. [last eleven words underlined] He like many other men on the N.W.

Contemporary manuscript copy of a letter from Captain John Bower, 84th Regiment, to his father Alexander Bower of Kincaldrum House, Kinnettles, describing how he saved the life of the future Sir James Carmichael-Smyth while shark fishing off the Cape

Author: 
Captain John Bower (d.1800), 84th Regiment of Foot, eldest son of Alexander Bower of Kincaldrum House, Kinnettles, near Dundee [Sir James Carmichael-Smyth (1779-1838)]
Publication details: 
Letter 'dated Cape Town May 10th 1797', on paper also with watermarked date '1797'.
£120.00

2pp., 4to. Good, on lightly-aged laid paper. Bower begins by stating that he is sending 'a Copy of a Letter which I have received from Dr Carm Smyth [James Carmichael Smyth (1742-1821) of the Middlesex Hospital]'. Smyth's son (the future Sir James Carmichael-Smyth) is 'a very fine handsome young man Lieut in the Engineers come out a Passanger [sic] in the same ship with us'. Bower and Smyth 'wisely went into the Boat which was lashed to the Stern Gallery to fish sharks which were following the ship - the Boat suddenly canted round in the slings, upon which poor Smyth went plump into the sea'.

Legal property document between John Bower Jodrell of Henbury, Cheshire; his wife Frances; Egerton Leigh of Twemlow; his wife Elizabeth; and John Glegg of Old Withington. Signed by all five, each with five red wax seals.

Author: 
[John Bower Jodrell (1747-1796) of Henbury, Cheshire; his wife Frances Bower Jodrell (c.1751-1821); Egerton Leigh of Twemlow; his wife Elizabeth Leigh; John Glegg of Old Withington]
Legal property document between John Bower Jodrell of Henbury
Publication details: 
4 May 1796; Cheshire.
£80.00
Legal property document between John Bower Jodrell of Henbury

Folio, 3 pp. With two embossed government stamps, and government half penny tax stamp in black ink. The five signatures on p.3 are each accompanied by a red wax seal.

One Autograph Letter Signed ('E. Batsch'), three Typed Letters Signed (two 'Batsch.' and one 'Ernst Batsch'), all to Bower; with two typed book reviews by Batsch (one marked 'translation').

Author: 
Rear Admiral Ernst Batsch (1879-1948) of the Imperial German Navy [Sir Graham Bower KCMG [Sir Graham John Bower] (1848-1933)]
Publication details: 
All items between 1930 and 1932. The first two letters from Kurfuerstenstrasse Nr.81.b, Berlin, W.62; the last two from Enzianstrasse Nr.1, Berlin-Lichterfelde, W.
£650.00

An interesting correspondence, from one maritime expert to another, casting light on German naval attitudes in the period following the Great War. Batsch's father, Admiral Karl Ferdinand Batsch (1831-1898), is regarded as one of the founders of the German navy. Bower, who served for twenty years in the Royal Navy, retiring in 1884 with the rank of Commander, is best known as Imperial Secretary in South Africa at the time of the Jameson Raid. Following the First World War he established himself as an expert in international law relating to naval matters.

Three Autograph Letters Signed (all 'J Rose Innes') from Sir James Rose Innes, and one letter from his wife ('Jessie Rose Innes'), all to Lady Bower.

Author: 
Sir James Rose-Innes (1855-1942) and his wife, born Jessie Dods Pringle (d.1943) [Lady Maud Bower (born Maude Laidley Mitchell), wife of Sir Graham Bower (1848-1933)]
Publication details: 
Sir James's letters: 1935, 1936 and 1939. His wife's letter: 1937. All four on letterheads of Kolara Farm, Gibson Road, Kenilworth [South Africa].
£180.00

All items good, on aged paper, with Lady Rose-Innes' letter in its envelope. Bower and Rose-Innes had worked together when the former was Imperial secretary to the High Commissioners for Southern Africa at the time of the Jameson Raid. Rose-Innes three letters are dated 17 October 1935 (12mo, 4 pp), 9 July 1936 (12mo, 4 pp) and 13 April 1939 (12mo, 4 pp). All are closely and neatly written. In the first letter Rose-Innes describes a journey 'through the S.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Eric A. Walker') to Bower.

Author: 
Eric A. Walker [Eric Anderson Walker] (1886-1976), first holder of the King George V Chair in History at the University of Cape Town, South Africa [Sir Graham John Bower]
Publication details: 
30 June 1927; on University of Cape Town letterhead.
£150.00

4to, 2 pp. Thirty-nine lines of text. Clear and complete. Neatly and closely written. Begins by discussing two books recommended by Bower: Otto Hammann's 'World Policy of Germany' and a work by Sir Francis Younghusband. Hammann's book 'confirms what Sir Sidney Lee writes about the Kaiser's telegram'; he is pleased that Younghusband's, which he has not yet read, contradicts the story that 'Lord Ripon was prepared for such drastic measures'. He has been 'correcting the proofs of the 600-page history of South Africa which I undertook to write for Longmans Green five or six years ago'.

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