JURIST

[Lord Mansfield, Scottish jurist whose judgments reformed English law on slavery.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Mansfield') [to the Earl of Liverpool] regarding his recovery from ill health and recuperation at Mount Ephraim.

Author: 
Lord Mansfield [William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield (1705-1793)], distinguished Scottish jurist whose judgments reformed English law on slavery [Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool (1729-1808)]
Publication details: 
'Mount Ephraim [near Tunbridge Wells, Kent] 2d Septr. 1784'.
£220.00

1p, 8vo. In good condition, lightly aged, with thin strip of paper from mount adhering to blank reverse. Folded once.. A neatly-written letter of fourteen lines. The recipient is not named, but is Charles Jenkinson, 1st Earl of Liverpool (1729-1808), whose country seat was Addiscombe Park in Surrey. Mansfield served in the First Pitt Ministry with Liverpool (then Lord Hawkesbury), the former as Lord President of the Council, and the latter as President of the Board of Trade.

[Lord Devlin, British judge and jurist.] Three Typed Letters Signed to Philip Dosse, publisher of ‘Books and Bookmen’, regarding possible reviewers (of his book 'Too Proud to Fight'), and an invitation for him to review.

Author: 
Lord Devlin [Patrick Arthur Devlin, Baron Devlin] (1905-1992), British judge and jurist [Philip Dosse (1925-1980), publisher ‘Books and Bookmen’]
Publication details: 
27 October and 13 November 1974; both on letterhead of West Wick House, Pewsey, Wilts. 17 January 1975; on letterhead of Casa da Colina, Praia da Luz, Algarve, Portugal.
£180.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. The recipient Philip Dosse was proprietor of Hansom Books, publisher of a stable of seven arts magazines including Books and Bookmen and Plays and Players. See ‘Death of a Bookman’ by the novelist Sally Emerson (editor of ‘Books and Bookmen’ at the time of Dosse’s suicide), in Standpoint magazine, October 2018. The three items are in fair condition, lightly aged and creased (the last in particular, being on airmail paper), and folded for postage. All three signed 'Devlin'. ONE: 27 October 1974. 1p, foolscap 8vo.

[A. V. Dicey (Albert Venn Dicey), distinguished jurist, Vinerian Professor of English Law at Oxford.] Autograph Signature to Secretarial Letter to Archibald A. Prankerd, regarding a dissertation and Henry Goudy, Regius Professor of Civil Law.

Author: 
A. V. Dicey [Albert Venn Dicey (1835-1922)], distinguished jurist and Liberal Unionist, Vinerian Professor of English Law at Oxford [Arthur Archibald Prankerd; Henry Goudy]
Publication details: 
19 February 1896. All Souls College, University of Oxford.
£45.00

See Richard A. Cosgrove’s laudatory entry on him in the Oxford DNB, as well as that on Henry Goudy (1848-1921), Regius Professor of Civil Law (like Dicey, of All Souls). The recipient, Archibald Arthur Prankerd (1851-1926), of Worcester College, was also in the law faculty at Oxford. 1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged and creased. Folded once for postage. Signed and underlined at foot in pencil ‘A V Dicey’. The letter, in a secretarial hand, reads: ‘Dear Prankerd, / This Dissertation will I think suffice. Please look it through & send it back to Goudy.

[William Frere, Master of Downing College, Cambridge.] Autograph Letter Signed to Captain Munby, ‘respecting a house at Yarmouth’.

Author: 
William Frere (1775-1836), Master of Downing College, Cambridge, jurist and editor
Publication details: 
Sergeant’s Inn [London], 7 February [paper watermarked 1819].
£50.00

2pp, 4to. Bifolium, annotated on second leaf ‘Mr Sargt. Frere’. Watermark: ‘STAINS & CO | 1819’. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn. Folded for postage. Addressed to ‘Captain Munby &c &c’, and signed ‘William Frere’. He apologises for not answering sooner ‘the communications I have been honored with from you respecting a house at Yarmouth’. He has been in London, where he has suffered ‘some uncertainty as to accepting or declining the offer’.

[Lord Denning, the man Mrs Thatcher considered the greatest modern judge.] Typed Letter Signed (‘Tom Denning.’), thanking Lord Monckton for ‘putting in a word’ with Oliver Franks regarding ‘Cumberland Lodge’ and backing from banks.

Author: 
Lord Denning [Alfred Thompson ‘Tom’ Denning, Baron Denning] (1899-1999), English judge, Master of the Rolls for twenty years, praised by Mrs Thatcher, and author of the Report into the Profumo Affair
Publication details: 
22 November 1961; on letterhead of the House of Lords [Westminster].
£45.00

1p, 4to. In good condition, lightly aged, with punch hole at top left. Receipt stamp at head. Addressed in autograph to ‘My Dear Walter’. Recipients formal name (‘The Right Hon. Viscount Mounkton of Brenchley’) and address at foot. He thanks him for his ‘line about Cumberland Lodge and for having a word with Oliver Franks on the telephone’. He understands Monckton’s ‘doubts whether the banks can give us practical backing, but even if they cannot I am most grateful to you for having taken time to consider it’. He adds in autograph: ‘& putting in a word for us.

[Sir Frederick Pollock, distinguished jurist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('F. Pollock') to Dr Maurice Ernest, discussing the question of arms control, preferring the term 'Limitation of armaments' to 'disarmament'.

Author: 
Sir Frederick Pollock (1845-1937), distinguished jurist and Cambridge Apostle, author of 'The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I' [Maurice Ernest, biologist; arms control; disarmament]
Publication details: 
27 April 1907. On letterhead of the Athenaeum, Pall Mall [London].
£120.00

2pp, 4to. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded several times. Small slip of paper with printed biographical entry on Pollock laid down at top left of first page. With several corrections giving the appearance of a draft, but from the papers of the recipient, the Austrian-born biologist Maurice Ernest (1872-1955). An interesting discussion of the question of arms control by a leading jurist in the years preceding the First World War. He begins by stating: 'Limitation of armaments is, as you rightly suggest, the only practical term.

[Sir Frederick Pollock, distinguished jurist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('F. Pollock') to Dr Maurice Ernest, discussing the question of arms control, preferring the term 'Limitation of armaments' to 'disarmament'.

Author: 
Sir Frederick Pollock (1845-1937), distinguished jurist and Cambridge Apostle, author of 'The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I' [Maurice Ernest, biologist; arms control; disarmament]
Publication details: 
27 April 1907. On letterhead of the Athenaeum, Pall Mall [London].
£120.00

2pp, 4to. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded several times. Small slip of paper with printed biographical entry on Pollock laid down at top left of first page. With several corrections giving the appearance of a draft, but from the papers of the recipient, the Austrian-born biologist Maurice Ernest (1872-1955). An interesting discussion of the question of arms control by a leading jurist in the years preceding the First World War. He begins by stating: 'Limitation of armaments is, as you rightly suggest, the only practical term.

[Death of Lord Bryce (Liberal politician and jurist James Bryce, Viscount Bryce of Dechmont).] Autograph Letter Signed ('E. Marion Bryce') from his widow Lady Bryce [Elizabeth Marion Bryce, née Ashton] to 'Mrs Clifford', describing his death.

Author: 
Lady Bryce [Elizabeth Marion Bryce, née Ashton] (1854-1939), wife of James Bryce [Lord Bryce; Viscount Bryce of Dechmont] (1838-1922), Liberal politician, historian and jurist
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£100.00

2pp, 12mo. On paper with mourning border. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. Replying to a letter of condolence from Mrs Clifford, she writes that she has been 'a good deal stunned with the shock & am still overwhelmed with a mass of unanswered letters. The blow fell, as you know, with absolute suddenness - no illness & no warning. After a day spent as usual in work, & a walk with me in the afternoon, my husband went to bed that last night apparently perfectly well, & I awoke next morning to find him gone.

[James, Viscount Bryce, jurist and British Ambassador to the United States.] Typed Draft Signed ('Bryce') of joint letter 'To the Chairman of | The Government Distress Committee', criticising methods for relieving 'the distress caused by the war'.

Author: 
James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce (1838-1922), Ulster-born Liberal poltician, academic, British Ambassador to the United States
Publication details: 
No place or date. [London? During the early years of the First World War.]
£180.00

3pp, 8vo. On three leaves with hole in one corner where they were attached with stud. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn. The letter is clearly a draft of a public letter to be signed by a number of eminent individuals, and was presumably composed by Bryce himself. No date or place, simply headed: 'To the Chairman of | The Government Distress Committee.' It begins: 'Sir, | We whose names are appended hereto view with concern the methods that seem about to be adopted for the relief of the distress caused by the war.

[Francis Wharton, American educationalist and professor of criminal law.] Autograph Letter Signed to John N. Purviance, Auditor General, Harrisburg,

Author: 
Francis Wharton (1820-1889) of Philadelphia, American legal writer, historian, educationalist and professor of criminal law [General John Nelson Purviance (1810-1885), Auditor General, Harrisburg]
Publication details: 
[Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.] 11 July 1850.
£120.00

1p, 8vo. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with fold lines and small hole made by breaking of the wafer. Addressed by Wharton on reverse to 'Hon. Jno. N. Purviance | Auditor Gen. | Harrisburg.' Endorsed: 'Francis Whatron, Esq. | Phila. | Ansd. 12 July 1850.' Wharton writes in a neat hand: 'Dear Sir | I enclose a note I have just received from Messrs Thomas and Rumsey - which please return. | Truly yrs | Francis Wharton'. Postscript reads: 'Let us know from you at your early convenience, as we are unable to advance a step till we know your views'.

[Macvey Napier, editor of Encyclopaedia Britannica.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Macvey Napier'), inviting the recipient to dinner after not being able to see him due to his 'occupations during the winter'.

Author: 
Macvey Napier [born Napier Macvey] (1776-1847), Scottish jurist, editor of Encyclopaedia Britannica and the Edinburgh Review, Professor of Conveyancing at the University of Edinburgh
Publication details: 
39 Castle Street [Edinburgh]. 26 March [no year].
£30.00

2pp, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged, with remains of stub adhering to edge on reverse. Folded twice. He begins by apologising that his 'occupations during the winter' have prevented him from seeing the unnamed recipient. If he is 'disengaged next Friday', Napier will be happy to see him 'at dinner at six o'clock, to meet a small party'. Laid down at the foot of the last page is a newspaper cutting of an article titled 'Death of Professor Napier'.

[Macvey Napier, editor of Encyclopaedia Britannica and the Edinburgh Reiew.] Autograph Letter Signed to his former pupil Robert MacFarlane (the future Lord Ormidale), regarding his book on the 'Practice of the Jury Court'.

Author: 
Macvey Napier (1776-1847), Scottish solicitor, editor of Encyclopaedia Britannica and Edinburgh Review, Professor of Conveyancing at Edinburgh University [Robert MacFarlane, Lord Ormidale (1802-1880)]
Publication details: 
Castle St. [Edinburgh] 30 March 1837.
£180.00

4pp, 12mo. Bifolium with mourning border. In good condition, lightly aged and worn, folded twice, with traces of glue from mount adhering to blank reverse of second leaf. Signed 'Macvey Napier' and addressed to 'Robert Macfarlane Esq'. After thanking him for sending a copy of his work on the 'Practice of the Jury Court', he explains that, although the subject 'is of great importance', it 'lies out of that department of the Law' to which Macvey finds it necessary, 'under the pressure of other avocations', to limit his studies.

[ Sir Travers Twiss, jurist. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('Travers Twiss') to C. S. A. Abbott [ the future Lord Tenterden ] regarding 'the United States Courts having limited the criminal consequences of violating neutrality to the Cruise'.

Author: 
Sir Travers Twiss (1809-1897), jurist who drew up the constitution of the Congo Free State [ Charles Stuart Aubrey Abbott, 3rd Baron Tenterden (1834-1882), diplomat ]
Publication details: 
Temple [ London ]. 21 May 1867.
£120.00

2pp., 12mo. With mourning border. In good condition, lightly aged. When Twiss 'suggested the circumstance', Sir R. Palmer 'had some doubts about the United States Courts having limited the criminal consequences of violating neutrality to the cruise [last word underlined]'. There was also 'some doubt about the effect of a sale by a <?> of a Prize Court to a third party. Twiss thinks 'it might be desirable to print & circulate the enclosed observations bearing upon those two points'.

[ John Fonblanque, author and whig politician. ] Autograph Memorandum, signed 'John: Fonblanque', regarding 'distinguishing Barons by Tenure from Barons by Writ'.

Author: 
John Fonblanque [ John Anthony de Grenier Fonblanque ] (1759-1837), English author, whig politician and barrister
Publication details: 
Temple [ London ]. 7 March 1830.
£90.00

2pp., 12mo. 55 lines of closely-written text, with a few minor emendations. In fair condition, on lightly aged and worn paper, with 'John Fonblanque' in another hand at foot of first page. The document begins: 'I have been considering whether the Distinction that we notices this morning in the Description of the Heir sometimes as Lord & sometimes not may not fornish another Criticism for distinguishing Barons by Tenure from Barons by Writ'. He proceeds to argue the point learnedly.

[William Latey, QC, jurist and journalist.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Wim Latey') to Clement King Shorter, regarding petitions for a civil list pension for his mother, the widow of editor John Latey.

Author: 
William Latey (1885-1976), QC, jurist [Clement King Shorter (1857-1926), editor; John Latey (1842-1902), journalist, son of John Lash Latey (1808-1891), editor of the Illustrated London News]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Lloyd's Weekly News, Salisbury Square, Fleet Street, London. 6 March 1908.
£56.00

4pp., 12mo. Bifolium. A long and detailed letter, beginning: 'The situation is not quite as we thought it. Yesterday I saw Mr. Higgs at Downing Street and he explained to me all the circumstances concerning the consideration of Mrs. Latey's petitions. | The suggestion emanating from him, with the Prime Minister's concurrence, is as follows.' The plan outlined, as Mrs Latey is not eligible for the pension, is for a fund to be established for her, to which 'the Prime Minister would add [...] a sum from Royal Bounty - the whole to be sunk in an annuity for her.

[Sir John Fischer Williams, international lawyer.] Typed Letter Signed ('John Fischer Williams') to R. F. Harrod, Hon. Sec., Oxford University Liberal Association, expounding at length on Professor Gilbert Murray and proportional representation.

Author: 
Sir John Fischer Williams (1870-1947), English international lawyer and authority on proportional representation [Gilbert Murray (1866-1957), classical scholar and internationalist; electoral reform]
Publication details: 
British Delegation, Reparation Commission, 7 Rue de Tilsitt, Paris XVII. 19 March 1929.
£220.00

2pp., foolscap 8vo. On two leaves, with the second attached at the head of the blank reverse to a piece of grey card. In fair condition, on aged paper. He writes that he will be 'very glad to sign the memorandum enclosed with your letter of the 14th instant in support of Professor Gilbert Murray'. He proceeds to remark at length on a 'statement in the last paragraph of the memorandum as to the working of Proportional Representation'.

[Sir Henry Maine.] Autograph Letter Signed ('H. S. Maine') to the Rev. Dr Campion, expressing support for his 'cause', but explaining that his attendance at a Lord Mayor's dinner for Sir Frederick Roberts means he cannot go to a Cambridge meeting.

Author: 
Sir Henry Maine [Sir Henry James Sumner Maine] (1822-1888), jurist [William Magan Campion (c.1820-1896), President of Queen's College, Cambridge]
Publication details: 
27 Cornwall Gardens, London, SW. 6 October 1885.
£80.00

2pp., 12mo. In fair condition, on aged paper with small closed tear along fold line. He is not sure whether, 'as a Permanent Official', he could attend Campion's meeting in Cambridge on 24 October, 'though I very sincerely wish well to your cause'. He has in any case 'accepted an invitation to a great dinner which the Lord Mayor gives on that day to Sir F. Roberts who goes to India as Commander in Chief.' He is not a great attender of public dinners, 'but this will be a large gathering ofr Indian soldiers and civilians, and I could not decline'.

Typed Letter Signed ('Wyndham. A. Bewes') from the jurist Wyndham Austis Bewes to the British colonial official Sir Graham Bower, regarding a conference at Oxford and the German jurist Walter Simons, and complaining of 'the terrible time'.

Author: 
Wyndham Austis Bewes (1857-1942) of the Grotius Society and International Law Association [Sir Graham John Bower (1848-1933), British colonial official in South Africa; Walter Simons (1861-1937)]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the International Law Association, 2 King's Bench Walk, The Temple [London]. 7 June 1932.
£65.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. Addressing Bower as 'My dear Sir Graham', Bewes begins: 'Considering the terrible times that we are passing through and which I see are so badly affecting you, I think you are too generous in sending a contribution fitting for halcyon days.' After a reference to Bower's bronchitis, he discusses the conference at Oxford, concluding: 'The German members who have already accepted are few for conditions there are frightful. Simons [the German jurist Walter Simons] is taking a kur [sic] and writes that he is not sure to come.

Typed Letter Signed ('Wyndham. A. Bewes') from the jurist Wyndham Austis Bewes to the British colonial official Sir Graham Bower, regarding a conference at Oxford and the German jurist Walter Simons, and complaining of 'the terrible time'.

Author: 
Wyndham Austis Bewes (1857-1942) of the Grotius Society and International Law Association [Sir Graham John Bower (1848-1933), British colonial official in South Africa; Walter Simons (1861-1937)]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the International Law Association, 2 King's Bench Walk, The Temple [London]. 7 June 1932.
£65.00

1p., 4to. In good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. Addressing Bower as 'My dear Sir Graham', Bewes begins: 'Considering the terrible times that we are passing through and which I see are so badly affecting you, I think you are too generous in sending a contribution fitting for halcyon days.' After a reference to Bower's bronchitis, he discusses the conference at Oxford, concluding: 'The German members who have already accepted are few for conditions there are frightful. Simons [the German jurist Walter Simons] is taking a kur [sic] and writes that he is not sure to come. PRIVATE.

Five documents relating to the application of Lord Chorley for the lectureship in Evidence, Procedure and Criminal Law at the Inns of Court School of Law, including letters of recommendation from Lord Wright and Sir Alexander Carr-Saunders.

Author: 
Robert Alderson Wright (1869-1964), Baron Wright [Lord Wright, Master of the Rolls, 1935-37]; Sir Alexander Carr-Saunders (1886-1966) [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley]
Publication details: 
London. 1952.
£120.00

The five items are in good condition, on lightly-aged and creased paper. Items One and Two: Typed drafts of a 'Statement of Qualifications', headed 'Lord Chorley's application for appointment to the lectureship in Evidence, Procedure and Criminal Law.' Both 2pp., 4to. Slightly different in layout, and with few (if any) textual differences. After describing his career Chorley writes: 'Although my chief legal study has been commercial law I had experience of teaching Evidence, Procedure and Criminal Law at the Law Society's School.

Typescript of report of speech by Lord Chorley [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley, 1st Baron Chorley], titled 'The Role of National Service in the Modern State'.

Author: 
Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley QC, British jurist and Labour politician [National Service; the civil servant]
Publication details: 
[1952.]
£70.00

5pp., foolscap 8vo, each on a separate leaf. Fair, on aged paper, stapled together in one corner, but with the last leaf detached. The subject is not compulsory military service but the role of the civil servant (see the conclusion, quoted below). The first paragraph reads: 'Lord Chorley said that there is a close connection between the sort of function which the machinery of government performs in any society and the civil service which is required in that society.

Copy of typed notes by the British jurist and Labour politician Lord Chorley [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley, 1st Baron Chorley] for a talk by him as part of a discussion on the role of the British civil service.

Author: 
Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley QC, British jurist and Labour politician [National Service; the civil servant]
Publication details: 
[1952.]
£80.00

11pp., 4to. In fair condition, on aged paper, with a couple of manuscript emendations. Without title, date or author's name. Can be dated to 1952 from comment on p.9: 'Power of Service enormously greater in 1952 than in 1852 - both individually and collectively.' Chorley's authorship is clear from the context: on the second page he recalls that he was 'a temporary Civil Servant in the first world war', and the document concludes: 'Suspect chosen because identified with Chorley Report - no responsibility beyond that of other members of the Committee.

Typed Letter Signed ('Woolton') from Lord Woolton [Frederick James Marquis, 1st Earl of Woolton] to fellow Labour politician Lord Chorley [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley], contesting figures given by him in a House of Lords speech on education.

Author: 
Frederick James Marquis (1883-1964), 1st Earl of Woolton [Lord Woolton], businessman and Labour politician [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley; Ministry of Education]
Publication details: 
On his letterhead as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Treasury Chambers, Great George Street, SW1. 21 February 1955.
£56.00

2pp., 4to. 46 lines. Fair, on lightly-aged paper. He begins: 'Since you spoke in the Education Debate in the House of Lords on the 9th February I have been meaning to take up with you a controversial point to which I did not refer in reply since you were not in the House.' He quotes a passage in which Chorley 'dealt with University students', giving detailed reasons for contesting his 'figures about awards'.

Autograph Letter Signed from the geologist George Gibbs to Charles Sumner, abolitionist Senator from Massachusetts, regarding the French jurist Jean-Jacques Gaspard Foelix and Sumner's review.

Author: 
George Gibbs (1815-1873), American geologist and expert on Native American culture [Charles Sumner (1811-1874), abolitionist Massachusetts senator; Jean-Jacques Gaspard Foelix (1791-1853)]
Publication details: 
Greenwich, Massachusetts; 28 February 1836.
£150.00

2pp., 4to. Bifolium. 35 lines of text. Addressed, with postmark, on reverse of second leaf, to 'Chas. Sumner Esq. | Boston | Masstts.' Very good, on aged paper. Written while Sumner was lecturing at Harvard Law School, the year before his visit to Europe. Gibbs explains that he has made an arrangement by which Sumner can forward his periodical the Jurist 'to [the French jurist] Foelix &c. & receive others in exchange. Hudson the Proprietor of the Merchants News Room has an agent in Paris & one in Narn to whom he will transmit them.

Two Autograph Letters Signed (both 'Paul Vinogradoff') and two Typed Letters Signed ('P. Vinogradoff') to Sir Henry Trueman Wood, Secretary, Royal Society of Arts.

Author: 
Sir Paul Gavrilovitch Vinogradoff [Pavel Gavriilovich Vinogradov] (1854-1925), Anglo-Russian historian and jurist
Publication details: 
Typed Letters, 24 September and 2 October 1915, both from Court Place, Iffley, Oxford; Autograph Letters, 13 February and 12 March 1924, both on letterhead of 36 Beaumont Street, Oxford.
£128.00

All items very good. The typed letters are both 4to, 1 p, and the autograph letters both 12mo, 1 p. Three items bear the Society's stamp. Letter One (typed, 24 September 1915, 10 lines): He will have 'great pleasure in addressing the Society of Arts', but there is 'one point which must be settled carefully beforehand'.

Autograph Note Signed ('Roland L. Vaughan Williams') to autograph hunter A. Hall.

Author: 
Sir Roland Lomax Bowdler Vaughan Williams (1838-1916), English judge
Publication details: 
3 August 1892; on letterhead of St. George's Hall, Liverpool.
£23.00

8vo: 1 p. Very good. Letterhead with crest. Reads 'Dear Sir | I understand from my son that you do me the honour to wish to have my autograph It gives me great pleasure to comply with yr request. | your's faithfully. | [signed] Roland L. Vaughan Williams | A Hall Esqre'.

Autograph Signature.

Author: 
Stephen Lushington (1782-1873), English jurist, abolitionist, helped Lady Byron divorce the poet, and acted for Queen Caroline in her trial before the House of Lords
Publication details: 
2 April 1869; on letterhead of 18, Eaton Place, S.W. [London].
£25.00

12mo: 1 p. On recto of first leaf of bifolium. Very good. Shaky hand. Clearly responding to a request for an autograph. Reads '[signed] Stephen Lushington | April 2 69'.

Autograph Letter Signed ['to Pinkham'].

Author: 
Sir William Reynell Anson
Publication details: 
20 August 1902; on letterhead 'GLENTROMIE, | KINGUSSIE, N.B.'
£45.00

English jurist (1843-1914), Warden of All Souls college, Oxford. Two pages, 12mo. On discoloured, grubby, creased paper, with a small closed tear and some bleeding due to damp on the verso. Extensive damp damage to blank second leaf of bifoliate. Docketed as 'To Pinkham'. Before leaving Oxford the previous week he 'ordered a somewhat miscellaneous collection of books' to be sent to his correspondent's library. 'It was a small collection - a few biographies, some college histories and one or two books which chanced to be in the booksellers catalogue & which looked interesting.

Autograph Note Signed to unnamed correspondent.

Author: 
John Romilly, 1st baron Romilly
Publication details: 
L[aw]. C[ourts]. 13 Ap. 1839'.
£30.00

Lawyer and Member of Parliament (1802-74), Master of the Rolls, 1851-73. On scrap of paper roughly three and a half inches square. Grubby and stained. Reads '<...> In Chancery | F. 131 <...> | L. C. 13 Ap. 1839 | Will [last word deleted] see minutes of judgment back of pp. 3 & 4. Will give final judgment on Monday. next, 15 Ap./ | John Romilly. | 10/- | <...> In the Matter of the <...>'

Historical sketch of the distribution of land in England with suggestions for some improvement in the law.

Author: 
William Lloyd Birkbeck
Publication details: 
1885; London: Macmillan and Co.
£20.00

8vo. Pages: viii + 100. 2 leaves of publisher's advertisements at rear. Publisher's brown cloth binding stamped in black. Tight copy in grubby, stained, worn binding. Birkbeck was Master of Downing College and Downing Professor of the Laws of England in the University of Cambridge.

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