GREENOUGH

Three Autograph Letters Signed from Consul Amos Perry to William Whitwell Greenough, one describing the critical response to his 'Carthage and Tunis, Past and Present', the others about Rhode Island Historical Society and Boston Public Library.

Author: 
Amos Perry (1812-1899) of Providence, US Consul at Tunis to the Barbary States, 1862-1867, and author [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899), Boston merchant, co-founder of American Oriental Society]
Publication details: 
First and second letters both from Providence, Rhode Island. 5 February 1869 and 24 April 1880. Third Letter: on letterhead of the Office of the Secretary, Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence; 18 August 1880.
£750.00

The first and third items good, on lightly-aged paper; the second letter brittle, on high-acidity paper, with slight loss to the corner of one leaf, affecting a few words, but not the sense, and a few repairs with archival tape. Letter One: 2pp., 12mo. 31 lines of text. Perry begins by asking when the 'class meeting' is 'to come off'. He then informs Greenough that 'Poor Vose has paid his last debt', and that he has received a reply to his letter of condolence from Mrs Vose. He complains that he has 'not heard a word from Little, Brown & Co. in respect to my book.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Ge: H: Moore') from George H. Moore, LLD, Librarian of the New York Historical Society to the Boston merchant W. W. Greenough.

Author: 
George H. Moore [George Henry Moore] (1823-1892), LLD, Librarian of the New York Historical Society [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899), Boston merchant]
Publication details: 
Lenox Library, New York. 23 December 1882.
£90.00

2pp., 12mo. 29 lines. On dry high-acidity paper, with a little chipping to extremities and a couple of closed tears, but the only damage to text to the two initials of the name of the recipient 'W. W. Greenough Esqe.', caused by slight loss to the bottom outer corner of the second leaf. He is 'anxious to know' if the copy of 'Part VI. of our "Contributions"' was received by Greenough, and how those sent to 'several other directions' fared.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Geo. S. Hillard') from the Harvard lawyer George Stillman Hillard (later District Attorney for Massachusetts) to W. W. Greenough, written from Paris in the 'Year of Revolutions' 1848, analysing the political situation there.

Author: 
George Stillman Hillard (1808-1879), Harvard-educated lawyer, writer on the law, United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899), Boston merchant]
Publication details: 
Paris, France; 16 May 1848.
£320.00

4pp., 4to. Bifolium. Ninety lines of text. Good, on lightly-aged paper, with small hole on second leaf causing damage to a few words of text. Addressed with two postmarks (one French, one American) on the reverse of the second leaf to 'William W. Whitwell Esq | Boston. Mass. | United States of America'. A significant letter, written from Paris by an astute and cultured American jurist on the day following the demonstration of 15 May 1848.

Two Autograph Letters Signed from Consul Amos Perry to William Whitwell Greenough, one describing the critical response to his book 'Carthage and Tunis, Past and Present', the other about the Rhode Island Historical Society and Boston Public Library.

Author: 
Amos Perry (1812-1899) of Providence, US Consul at Tunis to the Barbary States, 1862-1867, and author [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899), Boston merchant, co-founder of American Oriental Society]
Publication details: 
First Letter: Providence, Rhode Island; 5 February 1869. Second Letter: on letterhead of the Officce of the Secretary, Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence; 18 August 1880.
£600.00

Both items good, on lightly-aged paper. Letter One: 2pp., 12mo. 31 lines of text. Perry begins by asking when the 'class meeting' is 'to come off'. He then informs Greenough that 'Poor Vose has paid his last debt', and that he has received a reply to his letter of condolence from Mrs Vose. He complains that he has 'not heard a word from Little, Brown & Co. in respect to my book. Those papers - the Advertiser & the Transcript are slow in bringing out their notices. My book evidently does not take well in Boston.' He reminds Greenough that he still owes $5 for his copy. 'I am not in haste.

Autograph Letter Signed ('C. S. Henry') from Caleb Sprague Henry. editor of the New York Review, to William Whitwell Greenough, accepting an article, but complaining of Greenough's handwriting, and of 'a difficulty in getting Saxon type'.

Author: 
Caleb Sprague Henry (1804-1884), Episcopal clergyman and author, editor of the New York Review, Professor of History and Philosophy in New York University [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899]
Publication details: 
New York; 26 April 1838.
£350.00

3pp., 4to. Bifolium. 57 lines. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Addressed, on reverse of second leaf, to 'William W. Greenough | Andover | Massachusetts', with circular postmark in red ink and remains of red wax seal. Regarding 'the article on Bosworth's Anglo-Sax. Dict.', Henry writes: 'From the few first pages that I have read & the glance that I have given at the rest, I am satisfied that I shall be glad to print your article.

Two Autograph Letters Signed ('Horatio Hale' and 'H. Hale') from the ethnologist Horatio Hale to the Boston merchant W. W. Greenough, discussing matters including a future Lowell Institute lecture. With carte-de-visite photograph of Hale.

Author: 
Horatio Hale [Horatio Emmons Hale] (1817-1896), American-Canadian ethnologist and anthropologist, noted for his studies of Native Americans [William Whitwell Greenough (1818-1899), Boston merchant]
Publication details: 
Letter One: 22 December 1882. Letter Two: 15 November 1886. Both from Clinton, Ontario, Canada.
£650.00

All three items in good condition. Letter One: 22 December 1882. 7 pp, 12mo. On two bifoliums. In this letter Hale explains his reasons for turning down, despite the urging of his friends, the invitation to give 'six lectures, suitable for a Lowell Institute course'. He begins by apologising for not answering as a result of illness: 'this is the first time for ten years that I have been kept from attending my office by such a cause'. Since his 'Indian researches have become known' he has had many calls upon his time: 'I now find that I have been attempting too much.

Syndicate content