COSTER

[ Harold Coster, 'Photographer of Men'. ] Typed Letter Signed "Howard Coster", to Secretary of Authors' Syndicate Ltd, accompanied by typed list of his sitters, and brochure containing portraits of G. K. Chesterton, Algernon Blackwood, M. R. James,.

Author: 
Howard Coster [ Howard Sydney Musgrave Coster ] (1885-1959), 'Photographer of Men', London
Publication details: 
Letter from 8 and 9 Essex Street, Strand, W.C.2. [ London ] 2 April 1930. The brochure containing portraits from the 'Supplement to 'The Bookman'" Christmas, 1929.
£350.00

The items are in good condition, lightly aged and worn, with slight rusting from a paperclip. ONE: TLS from Coster to the Secretary, The Authors' Syndicate Ltd., London. 2 April 1930. 1p., 8vo.

[Printed pamphlet.] The Man who saw Heaven and Hell, foretold the Date of his own Death, lived in both Worlds at the same Time for twenty-seven Years. Reprinted from The Sunday Dispatch. "What Shall Man Believe?" No. 4. March 4, 1934.

Author: 
Ian Coster [Emmanuel Swedenborg; The Campfield Press, St Albans]
Publication details: 
Printed in Great Britain by The Campfield Press, St. Albans. [1934? 1937?]
£120.00

32pp., 12mo. Full-page portrait of Swedenborg, from painting, on p.3. In brown printed wraps. In good condition, on aged paper, with corner of first leaf folded down, and slight spotting to front cover. Scarce: only three copies on COPAC, at the British Library, Oxford and the National Library of Wales; the first dated to 1934, and the other two to 1937.

Handbill cockney street ballad entitled 'IT'S MONEY WELL LAID OUT. Sung by ALEC HURLEY.'

Author: 
Alec Hurley [Alexander Hurley (1871-1913), music hall artiste, coster singer, and Marie Lloyd's second husband [George Le Brunn; Harry Castling; London street ballad; cockney; East End slang]
Publication details: 
Date, place and printer not stated. [circa 1898]
£120.00

On one side of a piece of light-brown laid paper, dimensions roughly 240 x 125 mm. Text clear and entire, on lightly creased paper with chipping, short closed tears and loss to extremities. Crudely printed. A thirty-two line poem, arranged in four four-line stanzas, each with a different chorus. An excessively scarce piece of music hall ephemera. No other copy of this particular item, possibly produced for distribution to Hurley's music hall audience, is present on COPAC or anywhere on the web.

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