PRESERVATION

Autograph Letter Signed ('Thackeray Turner') from Hugh Thackeray Turner, Secretary of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, regarding the offer of assistance of Laurence W. Hodson of Compton Hall in the case of Cors Y Gedol Hall

Author: 
Hugh Thackeray Turner (1853-1937), architect and Secretary of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings [Laurence W. Hodson of Compton Hall; Cors Y Gedol Hall near Barmouth]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, 20 Buckingham St, Adelphi, London. 22 July 1910.
£56.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. Headed by Turner: 're, | Cors-y-gedol, near Barmouth'. He thanks Hodson for his letter, explaining that the last meeting of the Committee before the vacation was held on the previous day, but that he will 'write to Mr. Ansell in accordance with your suggestion'. He is indebted to Hodson for his offer of assistance. He will be grateful if Hodson can 'get in touch with Mr. Dangerfield and can suggest his asking the Society for its opinion'. Hodson was a wealthy brewer and patron of the Arts and Crafts movement.

Autograph Letter Signed from the conservationist Ethel Haythornthwaite, thanking Lord Chorley [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley, 1st Baron Chorley] for his speech to the Sheffield branch of the Council for the Preservation of Rural England.

Author: 
Ethel Haythornthwaite (1894-1986) and her husband Lt-Col. Gerald Haythornthwaite (1912-1995), pioneering conservationists [Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley [Lord Chorley]]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Council for the Preservation of Rural England, Sheffield and Peak District Branch. 10 June 1945.
£56.00

2pp., landscape 12mo. 28 lines of text. Fair, on lightly-aged paper, with slight damage to one corner. Addressed to 'Dear Professor Chorley', the letter begins: 'I do feel we owe you a very great deal for coming on Saturday. Every body seemed pleased with the meeting and that was mainly due to the chief speaker. They liked what you said and who said it.' Considering the demands on Chorley's time, she is grateful to him for not cancelling the engagement, and for the fact that he did not 'pour coals of fire' on her head for the 'silly mistake about the train'.

File of 78 documents from the papers of the jurist and Labour politician Professor R. S. T. Chorley [later Lord Chorley], relating to his campaign against the building of a 'road house' at the Old Brewery Stables, Great Stanmore.

Author: 
Robert Samuel Theodore Chorley (1895-1978), 1st Baron Chorley [Lord Chorley], legal scholar and Labour politician [The Old Brewery Stables, Great Stanmore; Hendon Rural District Council]
Publication details: 
London. 1932 and 1933.
£750.00

As Chorley is described in his entry in the Oxford DNB as a 'conservationist' with a 'deep attachment to and lifelong concern for the English countryside', it is a surprise that no mention is made of the matter to which this collection relates, which created some public interest at the time and involved a landmark legal action. The first item in this collection - a copy of typed letter from Chorley to the Clerk to the Hendon Rural District Council on 24 October 1932 - sets the scene neatly.

[Printed pamphlet.] 'An Address to the Guardian Society' by 'S. T.'

Author: 
'S. T.' [The Guardian Society for the Preservation of Public Morals, London]
The Guardian Society for the Preservation of Public Morals
Publication details: 
Dated 'London. 1817. No. XXI. Pam. Vol. XI. P'. [Extracted from volume XI of 'The Pamphleteer' (London: A. J. Valpy, Tooke's Court, Chancery-lane. 1818).]
£75.00
The Guardian Society for the Preservation of Public Morals

12mo, 28 pp, paginated [225]-252. Disbound. Text clear and complete. On lightly-aged paper, with some leaves detached. Title page reads: 'An Address to the Guardian Society. London. 1817. No. XXI. Pam. Vol. XI. P'. The following gives an impression of the sceptical tone in which this pamphlet is written. 'Your Society is declared to be, "for the preservation of public morals," a most praise-worthy and highly commendable institution. But how do you propose to preserve the public morals?

Small archive of 22 Typed Letters Signed ('Frank Baines') and one Autograph Letter Signed, to G. K. Menzies, Secretary, Royal Society of Arts, with documents including a draft speech by Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, with Baldwin's emendations.

Author: 
Sir Frank Baines (1877-1933), British architect, Director of Works, Her Majesty's Office of Works [Stanley Baldwin]
Publication details: 
1927 to 1928; on letterheads of the Director of Works, H.M. Office of Works, and 34, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, W.C.2. [London].
£450.00

The collection is in very good condition, on slightly aged and dusty paper. Several items bear the Society's stamp. An interesting and significant correspondence. The letters, in a variety of formats from 12mo to foolscap, are often long, and are written in an informal tone. Indicating Baines's deep involvement in the Society's affairs, they most significantly concern an appeal, organised by Baines on behalf of the Society, 'for the preservation of the cottage architecture of Great Britain', with the backing and involvement of Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.

Small archive of fourteen Typed Letters Signed and six Autograph Letters Signed (all 'Lawrence Chubb'), all addressed to Sir Henry Trueman Wood, Secretary, Royal Society of Arts.

Author: 
Sir Lawrence Wensley Chubb (1873-1948), pioneer Anglo-Australian environmental campaigner, first Secretary of the National Trust
Publication details: 
Between 4 June 1913 and 19 January 1917; three on letterhead of the Coal Smoke Abatement Society, the others on letterhead of the Commons & Footpaths Preservation Society.
£250.00

The collection is in good condition, on lightly aged and creased paper. The fourteen typed letters are all 4to, 1 p; the autograph letters are all 12mo, three of them of two pages and three of one page. Largely concerned with a lecture given by Chubb to the R.S.A. in 1916 on 'the Preservation of Footpaths & Rights of Way', for which Chubb requests '1,000 or 1,250 cards of admission'. The subject, Chubb comments (21 July 1915), 'seems in itself sufficiently important and interesting to warrant special treatment, and in lecturing I mostly keep footpaths & commons quite separate.

Two Typed Letters Signed ('H. Gordon Griffin' and 'H. G. Griffin') to 'The Secretary' and K. W. Luckhurst, Royal Society of Arts; with carbon of Luckhurst's reply; and draft of 'C.P.R.E. Publication on the Design and Layout of Small Houses.'

Author: 
Sir Herbert Gordon Griffin (died 1969), General Secretary, The Council for the Preservation of Rural England [Royal Society of Arts, London]
Publication details: 
Letters of 12 January 1927 and 10 December 1956, both on Council letterhead; carbon reply, 11 December 1956; draft, November 1956.
£100.00

All items very good. A couple with slight staining at head from paperclip. Letter One (to 'The Secretary', 4to, 1 p, 5 lines): Apologising for delay in acknowledging the 'letter and enclosures of 31st ultimo': 'my office was only opened on Wednesday last and I have had much correspondence with which to deal'. Letter Two (to Luckhurst, 4to, 1 p, 18 lines): Concerning 'a booklet on the layout and design of small houses' which the C.P.R.E. 'is hoping to publish this spring'.

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