EQUITY

[ Sir George Jessel, judge. ] Autograph Letter Signed ('G. Jessel') to his son's tutor B. Heymann

Author: 
Sir George Jessel (1824-1883), English judge and Master of the Rolls
Publication details: 
On his monogrammed letterhead. 19 May 1873.
£35.00

2pp., 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. He was 'much pleased' with his son's 'performance last Saturday', which he considers was entirely due to Heymann's 'excellent tuition', and he is adding an amount to the sum Heymann has charged.

[ Australian First World War equity finance.] Printed notice from the Agent General for New South Wales, headed 'New South Wales £3 1/2 % Stock, 1918. | Notice to Holders.'

Author: 
The Agent General for New South Wales, 1918 [ Australian First World War equity finance; New South Wales Government, Australia ]
Publication details: 
'2nd February, 1918. | (L.473) 1/18 - 25,000'. [i.e. 25,000 copies printed in January 1918]
£20.00

1p., 4to. In good condtion, lightly aged and worn, folded twice horizontally. 26 lines of text, beginning: 'The Agent General of New South Wales hereby directs the attention of Holders of the New South Wales £3 1/2 % Loan, due to be repaid 1st September, 1918, to the following terms of Conversion which are offered by the New South Wales Government, viz: -'. No other copy traced, either on OCLC WorldCat or on Copac.

[John Bell of Lincoln's Inn.] Part of document giving his legal opinion in a cause, written out by a clerk, and signed and dated by him.

Author: 
John Bell (1764-1836) of Lincoln's Inn, English barrister
Publication details: 
Lincoln's Inn. 14 March 1828.
£120.00

Bell's entry in the Oxford DNB records that 'In conversation with the prince regent (later George IV), Lord Chancellor Eldon was said to have described Bell as the best lawyer then at the equity bar, though he could "neither read, write, walk, nor talk": Bell was lame, spoke with a broad Westmorland accent, the effect of which was heightened by a confirmed stammer, and wrote in a hand never more than barely legible.

Autograph draft of a circular letter by the comedian Tommy Trinder urging Equity members to vote in favour of Sunday opening in a wartime ballot on that question. With a typescript of the circular, and a printed facsimile of Trinder's signature.

Author: 
Tommy Trinder [Thomas Edward Trinder] (1909-1989), English stage, screen and radio comedian with the catchphrase 'You lucky people!' [C.A.S.T., Campaign of Actors for Sunday Theatres, 1943]
Publication details: 
Undated [1943].
£120.00

The three items are stapled to one another, in good condition on lightly-aged paper. The first item is the typescript, which is 1p., 4to. It is addressed to 'Dear Brother Artist,' and begins: 'You will possibly be rather surprised to receive a letter from me, but after having spent most of my life in the Provinces, I now find myself landed in London. I am surprised at the amount of discussion and activity that takes place here regarding the "politics" of the theatre - and realise how you in the Provinces are apt to get left out.

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