Fairholt

[ Frederick William Fairholt, artist and antiquary. ] Autograph Letter Signed to '<Mayland?>, suggesting an appointment to discuss an individual who 'seems very anxious to come to some arrangement'.

Author: 
Frederick William Fairholt (c.1813-1866), artist and antiquary
Publication details: 
'Wednesday'. [ No place or date. ]
£50.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, lightly-aged, with fold to one corner. Fairholt's handwriting is legible, but unfortunately the names of the recipient and subject of the letter are not so. It begins: ' seems very anxious to come to some arrangement. Can we meet on the point. I do not know if you are in London, if you are will you give me a call on Thursday evening'. He gives a few other options, before concluding.?>

[Frederick William Fairholt, artist and antiquary.] Autograph Letter Signed ('F. W. Fairholt') to unnamed male recipient, reporting that he has done an engraving for him, and commenting adversely on the increasing 'taste for hard words'.

Author: 
Frederick William Fairholt (c.1813-1866), artist and antiquary
Publication details: 
11 Montpelier Square, Brompton. No date.
£45.00

2pp., 16mo. Bifolium. 21 lines of text. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. As Doubleday has not 'sent the last', he has 'done your 3rd Cut of "glorious Apollo" from the print alone endeavouring to give the antique style as faithfully as I could.' He thanks him for his 'bit about the "archaic" term', and is certain 'that that [last word underlined] - like many other derivations from Greek & Latin roots, are most frequently used improperly[. T]he taste for hard words is certainly on the increase among all classes - from the advertising tailor upwards.'

[Abraham John Mason, wood engraver.] Autograph Letter Signed ('A. J. Mason') to 'J. Mayer Esqre', discussing a commission for an advertisement to be placed in the Art Union Monthly, mentioning individuals (Hall, Fairholt, Clements) and processes.

Author: 
Abraham John Mason, wood engraver [Samuel Carter Hall, editor of the Art Union Monthly]
Publication details: 
28 Liverpool Street, King's Cross. 27 January [no year].
Upon request

4pp., 12mo. 55 lines of text, written in a neat, clear hand. On bifolium, with second leaf neatly placed in paper windowpane mount. The letter begins: 'I herewith send the electrotype of the Trowel, [not present] which is I think a beautiful specimen of the peculiar but slow process.

[Frederick William Fairholt, artist and antiquary.] Autograph Letter Signed ('F. W. Fairholt') to unnamed male recipient, reporting that he has done an engraving for him, and commenting adversely on the increasing 'taste for hard words'.

Author: 
Frederick William Fairholt (c.1813-1866), artist and antiquary
Publication details: 
11 Montpelier Square, Brompton. No date.
£45.00

2pp., 16mo. Bifolium. 21 lines of text. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. As Doubleday has not 'sent the last', he has 'done your 3rd Cut of "glorious Apollo" from the print alone endeavouring to give the antique style as faithfully as I could.' He thanks him for his 'bit about the "archaic" term', and is certain 'that that [last word underlined] - like many other derivations from Greek & Latin roots, are most frequently used improperly[. T]he taste for hard words is certainly on the increase among all classes - from the advertising tailor upwards.'

Autograph letter signed to the engraver and antiquary [Frederick William] Fairholt (1814-1866),

Author: 
Joseph Durham
Publication details: 
7 May [docketed 1857], 21 Devonshire Street.
£75.00

2 pp, 12mo. "Dear Fairholt / I could not get down to you last evening, tho' I tried very much - / I will correct any circulars you may be good enough to write for Hone and get it printed and sent out can you furnish a list of archaeological assns. members & institute & the address of the F.S.A.'s - I am without the present lists of either [...] Hone is dreadfully hard up and every day is of much value to him in this affair - / Faithfully yours / Josh Durham" A strip has been torn along one of the margins very close to the text, causing negligible loss to it.

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