GARDENER

[John Evelyn of Wotton House, Surrey, seventeenth-century diarist, writer and gardener.] Autograph ownership inscription of book, with shelfmarks, reading: 'Catalogo Evelyni inscriptus. | Meliora Retinete.'

Author: 
John Evelyn (1620-1706) of Wotton House, Surrey, diarist, writer and gardener
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£250.00

On one side of 14 x 2 cm slip of paper, cut from the flyleaf of a book. Aged and with contemporary blotting to one corner. The slip is neatly placed in a paper windowpane mount. Reads: 'Catalogo Evelyni inscriptus. | Meliora Retinete' Two shelfmarks deleted: 'N. 16' and 'J: 231'. A good brief description of Evelyn's book collecting is given in his entry in the Oxford DNB. As there are four catalogues of his books, identifying the work to which the two present shelfmarks are assigned should not present any difficulty.

[ Margaret Armstrong, Lady Armstrong, gardener. ] Autograph Letter in the third person to 'Messrs Carr' [ of the Newcastle Daily Journal ], asking them to insert a notice of the death of 'Mr. John Pratt', one of her family's servants at Jesmond Dene.

Author: 
Margaret Armstrong [ née Margaret Ramshaw ], Lady Armstrong (1807-1893), gardener, wife of William George Armstrong (1810-1900), 1st Baron Armstrong [ Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland ]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Jesmond Dene, Newcastle on Tyne. 26 December 1865.
£40.00

Margaret Ramshaw of Bishop Auckland married the industrialist William George Armstrong (1810-1900), 1st Baron Armstrong, in 1835. She played an important role in the design of the gardens at Jesmond Dene, the couple’s house in Newcastle, and later at Cragside, which is now a National Trust property. 2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice, and with traces of mount on blank second leaf.

[ James Lothian, Scottish gardener. ] Autograph Letter Signed to Daniel Mctaggart of Kilkerran, sending a book on the 'Potatoe question'.

Author: 
James Lothian (1817-1871), Scottish gardener, author of the first English book on the cultivation of Alpine plants [ Daniel McTaggart [ Mactaggart ] of Kilkerran, Argyll, Scotland
Publication details: 
No place. 19 June 1854.
£56.00

2pp., 16mo. Bifolium. Addressed on reverse of second leaf to 'Daniel McTaggart Esq: of Kilkeran [sic]'. In fair condition, on lightly aged paper. He is sending him 'Keith' (i.e. a book by George Skene Keith), which contains 'some facts bearing on the Potatoe question'. He has other works on the same matter, but they are 'out', with the exception of 'Vol: 2 of the Gardener which I send down'. In his opinion 'Works on Forrest [sic] trees and Landscape Gardening throw no light on either disease or Longivity [sic] of Plants.

Nine Autograph Letters Signed to him (eight in stamped envelopes), two Testimonials Signed, twenty printed competition certificates, and three loose envelopes.

Author: 
Papers relating to John Dale, nineteenth-century English gardener
Publication details: 
1874 to 1893; from various places in England.
£250.00

Some of the envelopes are grubby, creased, and stained, but the collection is in good condition overall. Most items are 16mo. The first testimonial (1 page, 16mo), by 'H Smith | Gardener & Bailiff', is dated August 1874. It reads 'John Dale lived under me in the Gardens at The Dale nr Manchester for two years, during which time I found him very steady & industrious & attentive to his duties'. The second testimonial (1 page, 4to, in official envelope addressed to Dale at Petworth Park) is from J. Smith, Curator, Royal Gardens, Kew, and is dated 28 April 1877.

Typed Letter Signed to F. R. McQuown.

Author: 
Ian William Beresford Nye
Publication details: 
15 September 1964, on letterhead of the British Museum (Natural History), Department of Entomology.
£35.00

Entomologist (1924-), author of the monumental 'Generic names of moths of the world' (6 vols, 1975-91). The recipient is the author of several works on gardening. 1 page, 8vo. In good condition, but creased and with one closed tear and with sellotape stains at head and foot. He thanks his correspondent for the letter of 10 September enclosing a caterpillar, and compliments him on its preservation. '[I]t is in perfect condition for determination. It is very difficult to preserve the green coloration, as in life.' He identifies the specimen as a cabbage moth.

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