POETRY

[Book; Ist World War Poetry] Cot 5

Author: 
[Edward Knoblock; Knoblauch]
Publication details: 
Methuen, London, 1917
£220.00

[viii].35 pp., 12mo, 17cm, decorated paper wraps, hinge strain, edges sl. worn, topt and bottom of spine damaged, ow good. Inscribed "From Tim | to | Tilda with love. | January 1918". COPAC and WorldCat only record the second edition ("Cot 5 and Rose Vacquette of La Boisselle", but Harvard have a copy of this first edition, naming Knoblock as the author. [Harvard have the Knoblock archive.]

[Nineteenth-century agricultural poetry.] Fair copy manuscript of anonymous (American?) poem titled 'Elegy on the death of a Farm Laborer.' With emendations and additions in pencil.

Author: 
[Nineteenth-century English or American agricultural poetry; Victorian rural verse; provincial literature; working class writing]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [1840s?]
£100.00

10pp.,, 8vo. On five leaves torn from a notebook. In fair condition, on aged and lightly-worn paper. A creditable effort, showing the influence of Gray's 'Elegy' and Goldsmith's 'Deserted Village', describing the unnamed farm hand's funeral, and reflecting on the virtues and hardships of the poor. Begins: 'From yonder peaceful and secluded dell, | Snug in the bosom of th'encircling hills, | The perfumed Zephyr bears a passing knell, | And melancholy o'er the Soul distils.

[John Pascoe of Veryan, Cornish poet.] Two autograph volumes of transcriptions of original poems, made on the eve of his death for Mrs Ball of the City Hotel, Truro, with extensive biographical notes for her, and a letter of presentation.

Author: 
John Pascoe (1820-1889) of Veryan (and latterly Castle Rise, Claremont, Truro), Cornish poet and Wesleyan minister
Publication details: 
The poems in both volumes transcribed in 1889, those in the first volume having been composed between 1844 and 1884, and in the second between 1881 and 1889. Letter from Castle Rise, Claremont, Truro [Cornwall], 26 August 1889.
£1,600.00

The two volumes contain transcriptions of a total of 65 original autograph poems, most of them unpublished, with extensive explanatory and biographical notes (sometimes running to several pages) composed especially for the recipient of the volumes, Mrs Ball of the City Hotel, Truro. In two uniform 4to notebooks with waxed black cloth bindings. The first volume is in fair condition, on aged and worn paper, in worn binding with loss of spine. The second volume has damp affecting the first 60pp., causing slight loss to text, and damage to the binding. ONE: On front free endpaper: 'Vol I.

[Book] A Boy of Clare

Author: 
E.H.W. Meyerstein
Publication details: 
OUP. 1937.
£45.00

Bound in off-white paper over boards; white cloth shelfback, 98pp., sm.8vo, good condition. Printed title stuck on front cover, 4 x 1cm, inscribed "Roderick from Pat || 15th March 1938." Scarce.

[William Angus Knight, Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of St Andrews.] Autograph Letter Signed ('W. Knight.') to James Dykes Campbell, expressing regret at revealing the existence of Wordsworth's 'Axiologus' sonnet, and attacking T. J. Wise

Author: 
William Angus Knight (1836-1916), Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University of St Andrews, 1876-1902 [James Dykes Campbell (1838-1895), Coleridge biographer; Thomas James Wise. forger]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the 'University of St Andrew. N.B. [Scotland]'. 2 January 1892.
£120.00

2pp., 12mo. In fair condition, on aged and lightly-worn paper. Written in a difficult hand. The letter begins: 'My dear Campbell. | You will find all I know about Axiologus, and Miss Maria Williams, in a prefatory note Vol I of my Edition of W[illiam]. W[ordsworth].s Poems (not Life).' He confirms that the poem is by Wordsworth, and expresses regret at 'letting it be known: for it led Tutin [John Ramsden Tutin (1855-1913)] of Hull to go & print the sonnet for private circulation some years ago.

[John Reade, 'the grand old man of Canadian letters'.] Autograph Letter Signed to Frederick M. Hopkins of New York, regarding his book of poems ['The Prophecy of Merlin and other Poems'].

Author: 
John Reade (1837-1919), Irish-born Canadian journalist, essayist and poet, 'the grand old man of Canadian letters', literary editor of the Montreal Gazette
Publication details: 
270 Laval Avenue, Montreal [Canada]. 9 and 18 October 1897.
£120.00

3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, on aged paper, with a couple of short closed tears along creases. The body of the letter, written on 9 October 1897, reads: 'Dear Sir, | I have published only one small volume of verse which has long been out of print ['The Prophecy of Merlin and other Poems', published in 1870]. I will see if from some friend I can borrow a copy to send you. | I have written some occasional and other verse besides that of the little book, but for some years have done little expect writing for the press.' In a postscript of 18 October 1897, signed 'J.

[E. Cecil Mornington Roberts.] Holograph Poem (signed 'Cecil Roberts'), a sonnet titled 'Liberty Challenged' ('Not without cause just and unshakeable').

Author: 
E. Cecil Mornington Roberts [Cecil Edric Mornington Roberts] (1892-1976), writer and editor
Publication details: 
On his 'E. CECIL MORNINGTON ROBERTS' letterhead, 'c/o Clarke & Co. | 13 & 14 Fleet St. EC.'
£100.00

1p., 4to. In fair condition, on aged, creased and worn paper. The poem features under the title 'Liberty Imperilled' in Roberts's collection 'Charing Cross and Other Poems of the Period' (1919), and the context suggests that the poem was composed at the commencement of the First World War. The sonnet begins: 'Not without cause just and unshakeable | Will we surrender up the cherished prize | Of individual liberty, so well | and nobly held'.

[Printed book.] Lavender Harvest.

Author: 
Constance Farmar [The Cayme Press, Kensington, owned by Humphrey Toulmin (1893-1971)]
Publication details: 
Printed at the Cayme Press, Kensington. 1926.
£120.00

50pp., 12mo. In light-blue boards, with white label on front board carrying title and illustration of sickle with sheaves of lavender. Internally good, on lightly-aged paper, in worn and aged boards. Uncommon: only three copies on COPAC (British Library, Oxford and National Library of Scotland), with a further four in American institutions on WorldCat. Farmar's only other book appears to have been 'Castles in Spain' (1907). She also produced the lyrics to a song titled 'Bluebell-time', with music by Ruby Holland.

[Sir Edwin Arnold.] Holograph Poem, signed 'Edwin Arnold', titled 'The Heavenly Secret', exhibiting a few differences from the printed version, presented to Mrs A. G. Henriques.

Author: 
Sir Edwin Arnold (1892-1904), poet and journalist, best-known for his 'Light of Asia' (1879) [Mrs A. G. Henriques]
Publication details: 
Place not stated. 6 March 1887.
£75.00

1p., 8vo. Laid down on a piece of card. Aged and discoloured, with chipping to extremities and some loss of text. The poem is sixteen lines long, arranged in two eight-line stanzas. The first stanza reads: '"Sometimes" - Althaea sighed - "in hours of sadness, | A sudden pleasure shines upon the soul; | The heart beats quick to half-heard notes of gladness, | And from the dark mind all its clouds unroll: | How comes this, Poet! You, who know things hidden, | Whence sounds that undersong of soft Content? | What brings such peace, unlooked-for & unbidden! | Answer me!

[Marianne Moore, American modernist poet.] Printed invitation to 'A Poetry Reading and Commentary' by 'Marianne Craig Moore | Distinguished Alumna of Bryn Mawr College'.

Author: 
Marianne Moore [Marianne Craig Moore] (1887-1972), American Modernist poet and editor of 'The Dial'
Publication details: 
At Cooper Union, 7th Street and 4th Avenue, New York. 20 January 1958.
£56.00

Printed on one side of a 9.5 x 15 cm piece of green paper. In good condition, lightly-aged and sunned, with one corner slightly-dogeared. The text reads: 'Marianne Craig Moore | Distinguished Alumna of Bryn Mawr College | will present | A Poetry Reading and Commentary | on Monday, January 20, 1958 | at 8:30 o'clock | at Cooper Union | 7th Street and 4th Avenue, New York | Admission free'.

[George Gilfillan, Scottish critic and 'spasmodic' poet.] Autograph Note Signed to an unnamed autograph hunter.

Author: 
George Gilfillan (1813-1878), Scottish Presbyterian minister, critic and 'spasmodic' poet
Publication details: 
Dundee; 18 January 1855.
£56.00

1p., 16mo (12.5 x 11.5cm). In good condition, on lightly aged and ruckled paper, with traces of mount on reverse and minor loss to one edge. Reads: 'Dundee | 18th. Jany. | 1855 | My Dear Sir | I have much pleasure in transmitting you my Autograph | I am | Yours very truly | George Gilfillan'.

[Shirley Brooks, editor of Punch.] Autograph Letter Signed to William Glen, commending his 'friend's verses', which have 'an echo of Keats in them'.

Author: 
Shirley Brooks [Charles William Shirley Brooks] (1816-1874), journalist and novelist, editor of Punch, 1870-1874 [William Glen; the Literary Gazette]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Literary Gazette Office, 4 Bouverie Street, EC [London]. 5 October [circa 1858].
£45.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. Brooks (who conducted the Literary Gazette between 1858 and 1859) writes that he has read Glen's 'friend's verses carefully, and with much pleasure. There is an echo of Keats in them, but no mere invitation.

[Charles G. Mortimer, lyricist and Catholic writer.] Collection of 54 autograph song lyrics and poems by him, mostly holographs (signed 'CGM'), noting the sale of each (to music publishers and magazines). With Autograph Letter Signed to his typist.

Author: 
Charles G. Mortimer [Charles Gordon Mortimer, lyricist, Catholic journalist and author [Dulwich College; Brasenose College, Oxford; Stonyhurst College, Lancashire; Rudyard Kipling]
Publication details: 
One from Caterham House, Caterham, Oxfordshire, and another on letterhead of Stonyhurst College, near Blackburn, Lancashire Undated [1920s and 1930s], except for one dated 9 March 1921. The letter to his typist dated 2 April 1934.
£600.00

After leaving Dulwich College Mortimer was a classical scholar at Brasenose College, Oxford. In 1933 he was received into the Roman Catholic Church, after which he became a schoolmaster in Catholic schools, most notably Stonyhurst. According to his profile in the Catholic Herald, 5 August 1938, Mortimer was 'well-known as a composer and lyric writer, and his work has been broadcast from the early days of broadcasting. | Recently he has contributed " uncle-duty " to the [BBC] Children's Hour.

[John Russell Lowell, American poet.] Autograph Letter Signed ('J. R. Lowell'), while American ambassador in London, to Lady Elphinstone, declining an invitation and attempting to arrange a meeting to renew their acquaintance.

Author: 
J. R. Lowell [John Russell Lowell] (1819-1891), American poet, author and diplomat [Lady Elphinstone]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 40 Clarges Street, Piccadilly, W. [London] 2 July 1886.
£60.00

1p., 12mo. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper, and with the margins cut down. The letter reads: 'Dear Lady Elphinstone, | I am very sorry that an engagement here will prevent my having the pleasure of coming to you this afternoon. But I hope to be able to go out to Richmond next Friday & if so shall do myself the honour of renewing so agreeable an acquaintance.'

[Handbill] The Cowper & Newton Museum Series. No. 4. The Kissing Candidate Letter from William Cowper to the Rev. John Newton March 29th, 1784

Author: 
[William Cowper, poet]
Publication details: 
A.H. Stanley, printer, Olney, [no year].
£56.00

Four pages, 16mo, grubby, small chip from first page, text clear and complete. Scarce. One copy only found on COPAC/WorldCat at Pittsburgh.

[Inscribed copy.] Trial of a Judge. A tragedy in five acts.

Author: 
Stephen Spender
Publication details: 
London: Faber and Faber Limited. 1938.
£80.00

115pp., 8vo. In red cloth binding. No dustwrapper. Aged, with back hinge sprung and one bumped corner at the back. Excellent inscription by Spender on the front free endpaper, in which he describes the history of the composition of the play: 'To And | with love from | Stephen. | March 16 1938. | This play begun January 1933, at Barcelona, partly written in January 1937 in Madrid & Albacete, and finished January 1938 in London, is almost a record of our friendships through five years.'

[Rupert Brooke; booklet] 1914 by Rupert Brooke set to music for Chorus and Organ, or Orchestra

Author: 
Alan Gray, composer
Publication details: 
Novello and Company Limited; New York: The H.W. Gray Co [1919? see COPAC]
£180.00

24pp., cr. 8vo, grey printed paper wraps, partially detached, creased and and worn, with two stains on front cover, largest 3/4"dia, contents aged but good. Tow copies listed on COPAC/WorldCat (both BL), i.e. very scarce.

[Peter Levi, poet and Jesuit priest.] Holograph collection of nine poems, titled 'The Element', with signed autograph note from Dom Moraes explaining their background.

Author: 
Peter Levi [Peter Chad Tigar Levi] (1931-2000), Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford, 1984-1989, and Jesuit priest [Dom Moraes (1938-2004), Indian poet]
Publication details: 
Dated by Levi to the period November 1957 to January 1958. Moraes' note dated 10 June 1963.
£750.00

14pp., 4to. In exercise book with green printed wraps. Good, on lightly-aged and worn paper. The first page carries the title 'The Element', with the words 'Peter Levi S.J. | Nov. '57-Jan. '58' in the top right-hand corner. With occasional light corrections. The second poem ('Out of shaking') has the directions: 'No title & no commas', and the last but one ('Unfinished Elegy'), which is the longest at 4pp., is annotated: 'There ought to be three parts or possibly four.

[Peter Levi, S.J., English poet.] Unpublished holograph poem ( 'P. L.') titled 'For Henrietta and Dom. | (December, 1960.)' Addressed to the Indian poet Dom Moraes and his wife Henrietta Moraes, lover of Lucien Freud and model for Francis Bacon.

Author: 
Peter Levi [Peter Chad Tigar Levi] (1931-2000), Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford and Jesuit priest [Dom Moraes (1938-2004), Indian poet; his wife Henrietta Moraes (1931-1999)]
Publication details: 
Place not stated. December 1960.
£280.00

2pp., foolscap 8vo. In fair condition, on lightly aged and worn paper. A fair copy of a twenty-eight line poem, arranged in seven four-line stanzas. Signed at end 'P. L. | December 1960.' The first stanza reads 'Rain-threaded gull-wheeling bell-clamorous air, | by wind shifted, by smoke lightly weighted, | in which sirens beautifully despair, | no monumnet crumbles uncelebrated,'. The poem ends with a simile of 'Adam when he woke: | stood for a moment as if he had been blind, | and bent suddenly over Eve, and spoke.' There is no indication that the poem has been published.

[Peter Levi, S.J., English poet.] Autograph Card Signed to the bookseller Eric Korn, with copies of his 'Three Poems' and the Jesuit bulletin 'To our friends', the latter with signed autograph note: 'This I did write & hideous [...] it is'.

Author: 
Peter Levi [Peter Chad Tigar Levi] (1931-2000), Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford and Jesuit priest
Publication details: 
Card postmarked from Campion Hall, Oxford, and with postmarked date 21 November 1971. Three Poems: Sycamore Press, 4 Benson Place Oxford; Spring 1970. 'To our friends': No. 33, April 1962; with note on letterhead of Heythrop College, Chipping Norton.
£200.00

The three items in good condition, with light age and wear. CARD: He has been told about Korn by 'Barbara and Cyril Connolly': 'Maybe we might meet, though I shall now be leaving England for a time. Do you ever have a catalogue? If so please put me on your list. I chiefly want classics & archaeology & (old) travels in Greece & Central Asia, but sometimes modern poetry. I am always at or c/o this address. Peter Levi.' THREE POEMS: Landscape 8vo, folded twice to make three panels. Printed in blue. The first poem is titled 'Riddle' and the other two are untitled.

[Alfred Austin, poet.] Autograph Letter Signed to the Chevalier de Chatelain, thanking him for gifts, and reminiscing about the Chevalier and his wife Clara de Chatelain.

Author: 
Alfred Austin (1835-1913), English Poet Laureate from 1896 to his death [Jean-Baptiste François Ernest De Chatelain (1801-1881) and his wife Clara de Chatelain (1807-1876), author]
Publication details: 
67 Queen's Gardens, Bayswater. 2 August 1877.
£65.00

2pp., 16mo. 17 lines of text. Good, on lightly-aged paper. He begins by thanking him for 'the History of the Flitch of Bacon Custom at Dunnow. I well remember reading in the papers of 55 the celebration of the fete at which you & poor Made. de Chatelain were the hero & heroine'. He has called on de Chatelain to thank him for the 'Fleurs et Fruits' which he sent him, but did not find him at home. He will try again before leaving town for the autumn, 'which I shall do in a few days'.

Autograph Note Signed and poem by the Congregational minister James Bennett of Rotherham, with manuscript poem ('Psalm 149.3, Let the Saints sing about upon their beds') by James Gray of Nailsworth, titled 'Elijah's Interview with God'

Author: 
James Bennett (1774-1862) of Rotherham, Congregational minister; James Gray of Nailsworth
Publication details: 
Bennett's note dated from Rotherham, 26 November 1829. Gray's poem dated from Nailsworth. 19 January 1828.
£250.00

On a 4to leaf removed from an album, with Bennett's piece on one side of the leaf, and Gray's on the other. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper, with a short closed tear to the fore-edge. Bennett's note reads: 'Dearest Brethren, ye know how that a good while ago, God made desire among us, that the Gentiles, from my mouth, should hear the word of the Gospel & believe. And God, who knoweth the hearts, bore them witness, giving them the Holy Ghost, even as he did unto us: put no difference between us & them, purifying their hearts, by faith'.

Autograph Letter Signed from the English poet Eliza Cook, sending what she describes as a 'specimen' of her 'pothooks' and hangers': a holograph poem titled 'Impromptu on being told the death of my Mother would leave a scar on my heart'.

Author: 
Eliza Cook (1818-1889), English poet and Chartist, close friend of the American writer Charlotte Cushman
Publication details: 
9 Gloucester Buildings, Old Kent Road [London]. 11 December 1845.
£100.00

2pp., 4to. Bifolium. In very good condition, on lightly-aged paper, with minor evidence of previous mounting. Apparently addressing an autograph hunter, she writes: 'I beg to forward you a specimen of my "pothooks and hangers" trusting you will "admire" if you honestly can. Believe I have pleasure in gratifying your request and am with truth my dear | Ever yours faithfully | Eliza Cook'. The poem, also signed 'Eliza Cook', is four lines long, beginning 'That stroke indeed would deeply gash'. There is no indication that the poem was published.

Autograph Letter Signed from the South African poet Albert Broderick to the editor of 'South Africa' E. P. Mathers, enclosing a corrected typescript of a translation of one of his poems into Afrikaans by 'Ex-President' Dr Francois Willem Reitz.

Author: 
Albert Brodrick (1830-1908), English-born South African poet [Edward Peter Mathers, editor of the journal 'South Africa'; Dr Francois Willem Reitz (1844-1934), President of the Orange Free State]
Publication details: 
Brodrick's letter, from 22 Cockspur Street [London, England], on cancelled letterhead of 141 Gloucester Road, SW. 9 January 1899. Reitz's typescript: Pretoria. 14 November 1898.
£850.00

Brodrick's Autograph Letter Signed to Mathers: 1p., 12mo. Good, on lightly-aged paper. 'Dear Sir - It may interest you to read the enclosed, written by Ex-President Reitz whose "renderings" of "Maid of Athens" & "Tam O'Shanter" are so well known. Somebody once said that "the only thing that doesn't lose by 'translation' is a Bishop" and as a rule this is correct, but I think in this instance I have gained'. In a postscript he asks for the return of the 'M.S.', underlined twice.

Autograph manuscript of the poem 'To Helena on her Birth day' by the English author Thomas Haynes Bayly, addressed to his wife, and apparently unpublished.

Author: 
Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797-1839), English poet, after Thomas Moore the most popular songwriter of his period in England
Publication details: 
Without place. [1830]
£220.00

1p., 4to. On laid paper watermarked 'G & R TURNER | 1829'. In fair condition, on aged and worn paper. Docketed on the reverse 'Bayley [sic] | 1830' and 'By Thomas Haynes Bayly, Poet | Author of "I'd be a butterfly etc etc'. The poem is sixteen lines long, and begins: 'My own Love! my true Love! here's health & joy to you Love, | A happy year without a tear & sweet smiles not a few Love! | Of all my anniversaries, I prize your Birth day best.

Holograph Poem by the English poet Sir William Watson, titled 'To the Lady Katharine Manners | (with a volume of the author's poems)'.

Author: 
Sir William Watson (1858-1935), English poet
Publication details: 
Dated 'William Watson | Windermere | Aug 1897'.
£100.00

2pp., 8vo. Neatly written out on two leaves of laid paper with watermark of Caxton Superfine Vellum. In very good condition, on lightly-aged paper. The poem consists of twenty-eight lines arranged in seven four-line stanzas, the first reading: 'On lake and fell the loud rains beat, | And August closes rough and rude.

Autograph Letter Signed from Welsh poet Richard Llwyd, 'The Bard of Chester', to Sir Foster Cunliffe of Acton, sending 'the Blackburnian poem' and hoping for a reparation of 'the breach' [with John Blackburne, Tory MP for Lancashire?].

Author: 
Richard Llwyd (1752-1835), Welsh poet and antiquary, known as 'The Bard of Chester' [Sir Foster Cunliffe (1755-1834) of Acton Park, near Wrexham; John Blackburne (1754-1833), of Hale Hall]
Publication details: 
Bank Place, Chester. 27 April [1821?].
£450.00

1p., 4to. Bifolium. Addressed, with broken seal in red wax, on reverse of second leaf to 'Sir Foster Cunliffe Bar - | Acton | Wrexham'. Chester postmark dated 27 April [1821?]. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. He is enclosing 'the Blackburnian poem which arrived this morning by the Carrier -' (the poem is not present). The second paragraph reads: 'Classical Rats are voracious - they read with a vengeance - yet I hope that the breach is not beyond the powers of reparation'. From the papers of John Blackburne, through the antiquary Dr James Kendrick.

[Printed handbill poem.] "La Belgique Martyre." Poème du maître belge Emile Verhaeren, dont la publication a été autorisée par l'auteur comme contribution a l'oeuvre "Asiles des Soldats Invalides Belges."

Author: 
Emile Verhaeren [Asiles des Soldats Invalides Belges; German war crimes in Belgium; the First World War]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [Circa 1918.]
£220.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, on lightly aged and worn paper. The poem, of 60 irregular lines, is placed (with a facsimile of Verhaeren's signature at the foot) within a thick floral border, reminiscent of the Arts and Crafts movement. It begins: 'Ce n'est qu'un bout de sol dans l'infini du monde. | Le Nord | Y déchaîne le vent qui mord. | Ce n'est qu'un peu de terre avec sa mer au bord | Et le déroulement de sa dune inféconde.' Scarce: no copy in the Bibliotheque Nationale, on COPAC or in the Imperial War Museum.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Mackenzie Bell') from the poet Henry Thomas Mackenzie Bell to 'Prof. Candy', regarding 'the most pressing difficulty we have'

Author: 
Mackenzie Bell [Henry Thomas Mackenzie Bell] (1856-1930), English poet, writer and literary critic
Publication details: 
On letterhead of 11 Buckingham Gate, S.W. [London]. 23 May 1911.
£45.00

2pp., 12mo. In good condition, on aged and worn paper. The letter reads: 'Dear Prof. Candy, | I think you would wish to see enclosed which please return after perusal. | If you hear of anything kindly let me know. It is the most pressing difficulty we have and we see no present way of surmounting it. | With renewed thanks, | always sincerely yours, | Mackenzie Bell'.

Copy of Victorian manuscript Masonic poem, apparently unpublished, divided into 'Opening' ('Hail, Thou from whom all light is shed', '1st. Degree' ('Lo, here we meet in brotherhood') and '2nd. Degree' ('Brother, thou upon whose eyes').

Author: 
[Masonic poem; nineteenth-century American Freemasonry]
Publication details: 
[American? 1870s?]
£350.00

2pp., folio. On two leaves of yellow paper, with 'PATENT' lion and unicorn watermark. Text enclosed within faint blue vertical lines. Good, on lightly aged and worn paper. No record found of the publication of this item, the first page of which is headed 'Opening: -', with the last section ending two thirds down the page, suggesting that it is complete. A rhymed poem of 36 lines: the first section consisting of 10 lines, the second of 16 lines, and the third of 10 lines.

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