CHARIVARI

[ Charles Samuel Keene, Punch illustrator. ] Unattributed charcoal portrait (self-portrait?), in colours, accompanied by a letter about him to his brother Henry Keene from 'M. Jackson', and a letter to a descendant from Sarah Fox-Pitt of the Tate.

Author: 
[ C. S. Keene [ Charles Samuel Keene ] (1823-1891), Punch illustrator; Henry Keene; M. Jackson ]
Publication details: 
Drawing undated. Jackson's letter on letterhead of 79 Warwick Road, Earl's Court, S.W. [ London ] 10 October 1891.
£90.00

The three items are unconnected, but clearly derive from the papers of a descendant. All three are in good condition, with light signs of age. ONE: The charcoal drawing, in colours, is on a 13 x 19.5 cm piece of wove paper, and is an impressionistic representation of his head, close cropped and with eyes closed, sleeping or in death. TWO: The letter from 'M. Jackson' is 3pp., 12mo. Bifolium. In it Jackson invites Henry Keene, shortly after C. S.

[ Linley Sambourne. ] Large printed 'Memorial Card', carrying engraving of 'the Liberal Monument to Mr. Gladstone erected within the Palace of Westminster'.

Author: 
Linley Sambourne [ Edward Linley Sambourne ] (1844-1910), English cartoonist and illustrator who worked with Punch [ William Ewart Gladstone (1809-1898), Liberal Prime Minister ]
Publication details: 
Without date or place. 'Linley Sambourne invt et delt V & C'.
£85.00

Printed in black on one side of a 19 x 29 cm piece of stiff card, with rounded corners. In fair condition, lightly-aged, with 4cm vertical closed tear at head. The memorial to a stern-faced Gladstone is depicted - a setting sun blazing behind it - between two mythical seated women, Justice on the right, and a hooded woman with a hand mirror on the left. In the background are the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey. The card is made out in manuscript to 'Edward C Young' (with '186357' at foot), and the caption at the foot reads: 'This Memorial Card was issued to [ Edward C Young.

[ Sir John Tenniel and his Punch cartoons. ] Printed and illustrated invitation card to a private view of his drawings for 'Punch Cartoons'.

Author: 
Sir John Tenniel (1820-1914), English illustrator, famed for his Punch cartoons and work with 'Lewis Carroll' (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) [ Punch, or the London Charivari; Fine Art Society ]
Publication details: 
At the Fine Art Society's, 148 New Bond Street [ London ]. 30 March [ 1895 ].
£56.00

Printed in black on one side of a 12.5 x 17 cm card. In fair condition, on aged and creased paper, with a little light staining. To the right of the page is an illustration by Tenniel of Mr Punch holding Yorick's skull, while a pug dog looks on. Text reads: 'Sir John Tenniel requests the honour of a visit from [blank] and friend, On Saturday, March 30th, To the Private View of some of his Drawings for "Punch Cartoons," etc., At the Fine Art Society's, 148, New Bond Street. 10 to 6 o'clock.'

[Original drawings for Punch cartoons; women] Four original ink drawings, later engraved and published Punch, on the subjects: women on bicycles, ice skating, women in the Oxford and Cambridge boat race, punting.

Author: 
'F. C.' [original drawings for cartoons in Punch, or the London Charivari]
Publication details: 
The cartoons were published in Punch (London): 26 August 1865; 18 May and 2 June 1866; 18 May 1869.
£250.00

Four charming and amusing cartoons from Punch's golden age. All four are executed in a similar style, but the identity of the cartoonist or cartoonists is unknown. (The first of the two cartoons in Item Two below, as published by Punch, has the monogram signature 'F C' engraved in the bottom right-hand corner. No Punch cartoonist with these initials is apparent.) ONE: Captioned: 'Another Brilliant Idea, Only Brillianter!' 21 x 13.5cm. In good condition, on leaf of browned high-acidity paper torn from a notebook. Two men idle in a punt while two women hold up sheets.

[Douglas William Jerrold, playwright and contributor to Punch.] Autograph Note Signed ('Douglas Jerrold') to 'Webster', accepting an invitation in lighthearted style.

Author: 
Douglas William Jerrold (1803-1857), playwright, journalist and contributor to Punch
Publication details: 
Putney. 29 November [no year].
£28.00

1p., 32mo. Good, on lightly-aged paper. The note reads: 'My dear Webster, | I have fasted all the week in joyful expectation of the 1st of December. | Every truly your's [sic] | Douglas Jerrold'.

[Shirley Brooks, editor of Punch.] Autograph Letter Signed to William Glen, commending his 'friend's verses', which have 'an echo of Keats in them'.

Author: 
Shirley Brooks [Charles William Shirley Brooks] (1816-1874), journalist and novelist, editor of Punch, 1870-1874 [William Glen; the Literary Gazette]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Literary Gazette Office, 4 Bouverie Street, EC [London]. 5 October [circa 1858].
£45.00

1p., 12mo. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. Brooks (who conducted the Literary Gazette between 1858 and 1859) writes that he has read Glen's 'friend's verses carefully, and with much pleasure. There is an echo of Keats in them, but no mere invitation.

[Printed offprint from Punch.] The ill-used Homoeopathists.

Author: 
[Victorian homoeopathy; homoeopathic; Punch, or the London Charivari]
Publication details: 
Without place or date. [From 'Punch's Almanack', London, 1859.]
£80.00

1p.,12mo. Fifty-three lines of small type. Good, on lightly-aged and ruckled paper, with traces of mount on blank reverse. The item begins: 'MR. PUNCH is accustomed to receive letter and treaties, imploring him not to call homoeopathy fudge, and some of them attempting to assign reasons why he should not. In all these communications, the medical opponents of homoepathy are called "allopathists."' Later on the author comments: 'PROFESSOR HOLLOWAY is perhaps an allopathist; however he does not tell us on what principle his pills and ointments cure all diseases.

Autograph Note Signed from the editor of 'Punch' Mark Lemon, asking the publisher Frederick Chapman of Chapman & Hall to listen to a proposal from Joseph Swain, 'principal engraver upon Punch'.

Author: 
Mark Lemon (1809-1870), editor of 'Punch' [Frederick Chapman (1823-1895), partner in the London publishers Chapman & Hall; Joseph Swain (1820-1909), wood engraver]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Punch Office, 85, Fleet Street, with printed date 1853.
£56.00

2pp., 12mo. Bifolium. Good, on lightly-aged paper, with reverse of second leaf laid down on part of leaf removed from album. Addressed to 'Fredk Chapman Esq', the letter reads: 'My dear Sir, | Will you hear what Mr Swaine [sic] (long since principal engraver upon Punch) has to say & if you can serve him you will oblige | Yours very truly | Mark Lemon'.

Autograph Signature ('Bernard Partridge') of the 'Punch' cartoonist Sir John Bernard Partridge.

Author: 
Bernard Partridge [Sir John Bernard Partridge] (1861-1945), cartoonist and illustrator, best-known for his work with 'Punch'
Publication details: 
Without place or date.
£20.00

On one side of a 4.5 x 13 cm strip of paper, cut from the bottom of a letter. In good condition, on lightly-aged paper. All in Partridge's hand. Reads: '[...]ment of time occupied. | With many regrets, | I am truly yours, | Bernard Partridge.'

Autograph Letter Signed ('F. C. Bernand') from the humorist Sir Francis Cowley Burnand to the illustrator Harry Furniss, lamenting that there will be 'no dinner for the Punch boys' in Christmas week, and discussing an unsuccessful illustration.

Author: 
F. C. Burnand [Sir Francis Cowley Burnand] (1836-1917), English humorist and dramatist, a main contributor to 'Punch' [Harry Furniss (1854-1925), 'Punch' caricaturist and illustrator]
Publication details: 
On Burnand's letterhead, 27 The Boltons, SW [London], 8 December 1891.
£56.00

2pp., landscape 12mo. Addressed to 'Dear Furniss'. He is glad to hear of Furniss's success: 'Your tour ends after the last dinner but one of the year. No dinner Xmas week! awful that isn't it? When all are feasting no dinner for the Punch boys!!' He hopes Furniss will be 'here with us'. Had Furniss been 'on the spot' Burnand would have got him 'to substitute something for your John Bull picture in almanack which no one (I do not speak of "The Table" but of our best friends outside) comprehends.

Autograph Letter Signed ('F C B') from the humorist F. C. Burnand [Sir Francis Cowley Burnand], joking about a prophecy made by his 'Punch' colleague Harry Furniss in a letter to 'The Times', addressed to 'Dear H. F. Vates et Vox Stellarum'.

Author: 
F. C. Burnand [Sir Francis Cowley Burnand] (1836-1917), English humorist and dramatist, a main contributor to 'Punch' [Harry Furniss (1854-1925), 'Punch' caricaturist and illustrator]
Publication details: 
On Bernand's letterhead, 27 The Boltons, SW [London], 21 July 1892.
£80.00

2pp., landscape 12mo. On aged and dusty paper. This item is a jocular response to a letter by Furniss, printed in The Times of 21 July 1892 under the heading 'A Parliamentary Prophecy'. Both the Times letter and the present item are published in Furniss's 'Confessions of a Caricaturist' (1901), with other matter and the context explained. In this item Burnand teases Furniss about a misprint ('Is that setter-up-of-type still alive?

Autograph Letter Signed from the satirist Percival Leigh to 'My dear Brooks' [fellow 'Punch' contributor Shirley Brooks], regarding his writing, the nature of the joke, the unsuitability of his Hampshire surroundings to literature, and other matters.

Author: 
Percival Leigh (1813–1889), satirist, the first writer to carve his name into the 'Punch' table [Charles William Shirley Brooks (1816-1874), editor of 'Punch' from 1870 to his death]
Publication details: 
Shirley Warren, near Southampton. 28 July 1865.
£120.00

4pp., 12mo. Good, on lightly-aged paper. He considers the cut excellent, and is grateful to Brooks for having 'managed so well' with his article. 'Many such an article of mine has been sacrificed, though absolutely a pretty good one, and comparatively to that which stood in its place, superexcellent. But such is my luck. By the by, don't measure the quantity of all that I do by what appeareth.' He reports that 'Fred is much amused with the verses on the Queen's first baby. I said that there are two men here besides himself who understand a joke.

Autograph Letter Signed ('W P Frith') from the artist William Powell Frith [W. P. Frith] to an unnamed correspondent [Lawrence Alma Tadema?], regarding a forthcoming lecture by the 'Punch' cartoonist and novelist George du Maurier.

Author: 
William Powell Frith [W. P. Frith] (1819-1909), English genre painter [George du Maurier (1834-1896), 'Punch' cartoonist and author of 'Trilby'; Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912), Victorian artist]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of Ashenhurst, 7 Sydenham Rise, SE [London]. 13 May 1892.
£56.00

1p., 12mo. Good, on lightl-aged paper. He regrets that 'absence from London' will prevent him from 'attending the lecture' of his 'old friend Dumaurier', to whom he wishes 'every possible success'. He thanks the recipient for 'the compliment implied' in his invitation. On 25 May 1892 The Times reports a lecture that day at 'Prince's Hall: Mr. Du Maurier on "Social Pictorial Satire," Mr. Alma-Tadema, R.A., in the chair, 9.'

Autograph Letter Signed from the dramatist and editor of 'Punch' Tom Taylor to J. Watkins [the photographer John Watkins?], regarding the construction of a case for a portrait of him.

Author: 
Tom Taylor (1817-1880), playwright and comic writer, author of 'The Ticket of Leave Man' (1863) and editor of 'Punch' [John & Charles Watkins, London photographers]
Publication details: 
On letterhead of the Local Government Act Office, 8 Richmond Terrace, Whitehall; 30 January [1864?].
£60.00

3pp., 8vo. Bifolium. Good, on lightly-aged paper, with remains of stub along one edge. Second leaf inserted into a paper windowpane mount. Written in a hurried and difficult hand. Taylor writes that he wishes to have a portrait put into a case 'by the workman you employ for such work'. He gives instructions, concluding 'The portrait I think the most satisfactory that has yet been taken of me.' The National Portrait Gallery possesses an albumen carte-de-visite of Taylor ('1864 or before') by John & Charles Watkins.

Engraving by John Tenniel, from 'Punch' for 1867, titled 'Check to King Mob'. With caption referring to 'the London mob of would-be conspirators and sympathisers with revolutionary plots' and the attempt by the Fenians to blow up Clerkenwell Prison.

Author: 
Sir John Tenniel (1820-1914), illustrators [Punch, or the London Charivari; Fenians; revolutionary plots]
Check to King Mob
Publication details: 
From "Punch, or the London Charivari", November 30, 1867.
£75.00
Check to King Mob

On paper roughly 33 x 25.5 cm. The illustration itself is clear and complete on lightly-aged paper. Creasing around extremities and to left of caption. Tenniel's monogram, with number 61, in bottom left-hand corner. Britannia grips King Mob by the throat, while a paper crown (with 'MOB LAW' written on it) falls from his head.

Original engraving by John Tenniel, for 'Punch, or the London Charivari', October 1867, titled 'The Order of the Day; or, Unions and Fenians.'

Author: 
Sir John Tenniel (1820-1914), illustrators [Punch, or the London Charivari; Fenians; Trade Unions; revolutionary plots]
The Order of the Day; or, Unions and Fenians
Publication details: 
From 'Punch, or the London Charivari', 12 October 1867.
£95.00
The Order of the Day; or, Unions and Fenians

On paper 52 x 33 cm. Tenniel's monogram, with number 58, in bottom left-hand corner. An giant female figure, with black mask, blazing torch and sash on which is written 'MURDER', directs an assemblage of Fenians and Sheffield trade unionists. The caption reads 'Fenian conspiracies and outrages in Ireland and Manchester - co-incident with the revelations of murderous Trade-unionism at Sheffield and elsewhere - agitated the public mind, and seemed like an evocation of the Spirit of Slaughter to trample on the Law.

Autograph Letter Signed from the editor of 'Punch' F. C. Burnand to T. H. Lacy, regarding the publication of a farce.

Author: 
F. C. Burnand [Sir Francis Cowley Burnand] (1836-1917), English comic writer and editor of 'Punch' [Thomas Hailes Lacy (1809-1873), actor and theatrical publisher]
Autograph Letter Signed from the editor of 'Punch' F. C. Burnand
Publication details: 
29 April 1869; on letterhead of Hale Lodge, Edgware.
£56.00
Autograph Letter Signed from the editor of 'Punch' F. C. Burnand

12mo, 2 pp. Bifolium. Fair, on aged paper. He begins 'Print the farce', and gives two conditions, ending 'There that's definite'. He will have the farce published after it is performed in London, 'at a good theatre of course'. 'But get on with it and lets have the proofs.' He will 'most likely' play it himself 'at Manchester and somewhere else, when I will put all this stage business &c in'. Ends 'Toole wants to do it. | Yours Tooley - I mean Truly'. In one of two postscripts he hopes Lacy has 'a good supply of Billy Taylor. Hopewood & Crew publish it.'

Autograph Letter Signed to 'Dear Mr Taylor'.

Author: 
Barry Pain [Barry Eric Odell Pain] (1864-1928), English humorist and contributor to Punch magazine [Sir Hubert von Herkomer (1849-1914)]
Publication details: 
13 April 1905; on letterhead of Hogarth House, Bushey, Herts.
£38.00

12mo, 1 p. Thirteen lines. Text clear and complete. On aged and foxed paper with some fraying to edges (not affecting text). He would like to show Taylor 'something of interest with reference to Sir Herbert Taylor [sometime soldier and Private Secretary to teh KIng]' and suggests meeting that night. 'It seems rather late, but I shall be at von Herkomer's till then'.

Letter, headed 'Copy', in contemporary hand, from 'X.' to 'Mr. Editor' [of Punch].

Author: 
Punch, or The London Charivari' [Mark Lemon (1809-1870), editor; John Leech; Charles Kean; William Williams (1788-1865), Radical M.P. for Lambeth]
Publication details: 
01/05/59
£56.00

12mo, 4 pp. Bifolium. Watermarked 'TOWGOOD'S | SUPER FINE | 1859'. Eighty-seven lines of text. Text clear and complete on aged and grubby paper. With little hope of influencing the editor of Punch, the author feels compelled to 'write and tell you what I and many others think about your Publication and the malignant spite you display towards individuals who happen to incur your wrath'. This 'malignity', he feels, 'must be derived from that murderous old ruffian from whom your publication takes its name, and which alone prevents it being an influential publication.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Bernard Partridge.') to 'Miss Smith'.

Author: 
Bernard Partridge [Sir John Bernard Partridge] (1861-1945), English cartoonist and illustrator, best-known for his work for 'Punch'
Publication details: 
24 January 1897 ('M.dccc.xc.vij: | jan: xxiv.'); on letterhead of 11 Marlborough Road, St John's Wood, [London] N.W.
£56.00

12mo, 3 pp. Bifolium. Good, on lightly-aged paper. Attractive red letterhead, in the Arts and Crafts style. The writings she referred to in a previous letter have not come. 'You probably forgot to enclose them. I expect to read some of the papers in the days when I look in the P[all]. M[all]. G[azette].' He asks her to give him 'an idea of what the publisher proposes to spend on the illustrations, and also the size of them, and the style - pen & ink, or "wash".' He has heard news of her 'from Welsh, Ethel Johnson's husband, who is with me at the Haymarket'.

Autograph Signature ('Geoe Cruikshank') on slip of paper.

Author: 
George Cruikshank (1792-1878), English engraver, illustrator and caricaturist
Publication details: 
Date and place not stated.
£35.00

Dimensions of paper roughly 10.5 x 4.5 cm. Two edges straight and two rough. Aged and grubby, with a 3 cm closed tear (repaired on reverse with archival tape), extending from the right and affecting the last two letters of Cruikshank's bold signature, which is 7 cm long and initially 3 cm high, with the final 'e' of the Christian name in superscript and the surname underlined in a backwards stroke continuing the final letter. Neatly mounted on a piece of card (roughly 9 x 14 cm) and presented in a plastic sleeve.

ACS ('Walter Emanuel') to Hammerton.

Author: 
Walter Emanuel [Sir John Alexander Hammerton (1871-1949), author and editor; The London Magazine; The Manchester Guardian; Punch magazine]
Publication details: 
28 November 1905; on letterhead of 89 Ladbroke Grove, W.
£25.00

Dimensions of card roughly 8.5 x 11 cm. Good, with slight creasing. Twenty lines of text. Congratulating Hammerton on his appointment as editor of the 'London Magazine'.

Original drawing.

Author: 
George Morrow [Punch, or the London Charivari]
Publication details: 
Undated and unsigned.
£56.00

Ulster illustrator (1869-1955), best known for his humourous illustrations in Punch magazine. Good clear illustration, in black ink over pencil, roughly four inches by one and a half, on grubby and spotted piece of card, roughly eight inches by four and a half. Depicts head and shoulders of young girl in field, with rising sun behind, and cluster of foliage in circle around her and extending to right, where it entwines itself around the word 'YOUTH'.

Autograph Letter Signed ('G. S. Layard') to Lieutenant-Colonel J. B. Gaskell.

Author: 
George Somes Layard (1857-1925), English biographical author; Shirley Brooks (1816-74), editor of 'Punch'
Publication details: 
9 August 1906; on letterhead 'BULLS CLIFF, FELIXSTOWE.'
£100.00

Four pages, 12mo. Very good on lightly aged paper. Docketed by Gaskell at head of first page 'This letter is written to myself in reply to my offer of the loan of 91 Shirley Brooks' letters. | J. B. Gaskell'. Acknowledges the receipt of the letters which Gaskell has 'so generously' placed at his disposal, and assures him that they will be 'treated with the greatest care' and returned as soon as possible, together with the photograph of 'Epicurus Rotundus' (Brooks's pen name), 'which is new to me'. Asks for 'any reminiscences, hearsay or otherwise of S. B.

Autograph Note Signed ('F. C. Burnand') to unnamed male correspondent.

Author: 
Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (1836-1917), English writer, editor of the magazine 'Punch' from 1880 to 1906
Publication details: 
10 December 1901; place not stated.
£30.00

One page. Dimensions of paper roughly four inches by seven. On piece of aged, stained paper, mounted on piece of card. Remains of biographical cutting in bottom right-hand corner. Reads 'Here you are Sir | Autographs cheap today | F. C. Burnand | F. C. B. | 10 Dec 1901'.

Autograph Letter Signed to Mrs Chapman.

Author: 
William Agnew (1825-1910), English art dealer, director of the magazine 'Punch' from 1872
Publication details: 
8 October 1865; on monogrammed letterhead.
£60.00

Three pages, 12mo. Very good on lightly aged paper with slightest trace of previous mount adhering to blank verso of second leaf of bifolium. He has 'looked out' and is sending 'a few interesting Autographs', and would have sent them before, had he not been 'a great invalid all summer'. 'I will get Miss Chapman a good collection of the autographs of literary men. I am now very closely connected with Punch & other publications and shall have frequent opportunities.' Agnew's family, as partners in Bradbury & Agnew, were for many years the publishers of 'Punch'.

Autograph Letter Signed ('F C B.') to 'My dear Phil' - the publisher of 'Punch' Philip Leslie Agnew (1863-1938).

Author: 
Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (1836-1917), editor of 'Punch' [Phil May; Philip Leslie Agnew]
Publication details: 
31 July 1893; on letterhead 'Whitefriars, London.'
£56.00

12mo: 2 pp. On creased, discoloured paper, with small closed tear and traces of previous mount adhering to reverse. An amusing, playful letter in a smudged, expansive hand. Reads 'My dear Phil | The other Phil Phil May will Phil the page in Xmas No. This will fill up & give it a fillip. ergo no Caran d'Ache | With Phil we're full. | Ought to be a fine number. | Have asked Phil May to contribute previously - | Well Phil May - but will Phil? | perhaps a wilfil person'. Accompanied by long typed commentary, giving provenance 'From a group of letters to Phil Agnew.

Autograph Letter Signed ('Godfrey Turner') from Turner to [Charles Henry] Ross (1842?-1897).

Author: 
Godfrey Wordsworth Turner (1825-1891), English art critic and journalist, connected with the 'Daily Telegraph'
Publication details: 
15 December 1880; on letterhead of the Daily Telegraph.
£38.00

Three pages, 12mo. On aged paper, with some foxing, a few closed tears and wear to extremities. Glue and strip of mount adhering to blank verso of second leaf of bifolium. Text clear and entire. He is in 'a maelstrom of work and worry' and asks Ross 'a question which you are almost certain not to be able to answer!' Asks if he has 'seen Tom Smith's crackers', and if so, whether he observed 'anything specially and eminently notable'.

Autograph Note Signed ('F. C. Burnand') to unnamed male individual.

Author: 
Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (1836-1917), English writer, editor of the magazine 'Punch' from 1880 to 1906 [Mark Lemon]
Publication details: 
Date and place not stated [but pre-1870].
£76.00

On irregular piece of lightly creased and aged paper (roughly seven and a half by four and a half inches), with some chipping to extremities. Headed 'Punch Photographs'. 'Mr Mark Lemon [1809-1870, Punch editor] wishes me to come up to you & be photographed. I propose being with you at one tomorrow Saturday, if I am not unavoidably detained in Westminster on a trial.'

Two Autograph Letters Signed and two Autograph Notes Signed (all four 'J. Ashby-Sterry') to [Edward] Draper.

Author: 
Joseph Ashby-Sterry (c.1836-1917), English painter and author [Punch, or the London Charivari]
Publication details: 
1871, 1872, 1873 and 1880; the first three from 3 Plowden Buildings, Temple, and the last from 4 Marine Parade, Dover.
£75.00

ITEM ONE (note, one page, 12mo, 3 December 1871, remains of grey paper mount adhering to verso of blank second leaf of bifolium): Apologises for sending a undated note: 'I daresay you can manage to fix at about what period it was written'. ITEM TWO (note, one page, 8vo, 12 December 1872, on creased, aged paper): Declining a dinner invitation. ITEM THREE (letter, one page, 8vo, 21 November 1873, on aged paper heavily chipped at head and foot): He has just described Draper's paper to Blanchard, who 'thinks it just the very thing they want. They like to have dates.

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