ENGLISH

[Stan Barstow, working-class Yorkshire novelist and playwright, author of ‘A Kind of Loving’.] Typed Letter Signed to Paul Furness, discussing the literary group in The Fenton pub in Leeds, connected with the BBC radio programme 'The Northern Drift'.

Author: 
Stan Barstow (1928-2011), working-class Yorkshire novelist and playwright, author of the novel ‘A Kind of Loving’, which was made into a ‘kitchen sink’ film
Publication details: 
5 November 1982. With his printed address label from Goring House, Goring Park Avenue, Oldham, West Yorkshire.
£100.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p, foolscap 8vo. Thirty lines of text. Signed ‘Stan Barstow’. One of a number of letters to Furness by writers, responding to his enquiry about socialist authors and British pubs. Barstow begins by discussing ‘The Fenton in Woodhouse Lane, Leeds’, which had ‘proximity to the BBC, where Alfred Bradley ran the radio drama studio.

[Louis-Arsène Delaunay, French actor with the Comédie Française.] Autograph Letter Signed, in French, to Tom Taylor, playwright and editor of Punch, in enveloped addressed by him to 'Sir Tom Taylor'.

Author: 
Louis-Arsène Delaunay (1826-1903), French actor who over four decades created almost two hundred parts with the Comédie Française [Tom Taylor (1817-1880), playwright and editor of Punch]
Publication details: 
'London July 4 1879 / Upper Montagu st. W'.
£50.00

See his entry in Encyclopaedia Britannica, and Taylor's in the Oxford DNB. 1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged, and folded once. In worn envelope with Penny Red stamp and postmark, and slight loss around flap. The envelope was no doubt retained because it was addressed by Delaunay to 'Sir Tom Taylor / Lavender Sweet [sic] / Wandsworth'. A neatly laid written and laid out communication, addressed to ‘Cher Monsieur Taylor’ and signed ‘Yours truly / L Delaunay / de la Comedie française’.

[Lord Brassey [Thomas Brassey, 1st Earl Brassey], Liberal party politician and Governor of Victoria.] Autograph Letter Signed quoting three ‘maxims’ that he uses.

Author: 
Lord Brassey [Thomas Brassey, 1st Earl Brassey] (1836-1918), Liberal party politician, Governor of Victoria in Australia and yachtsman
Publication details: 
18 December 1911. On two letterheads of Sand Hill, Winslow, Bucks.
£45.00

See his entry, and that of his father the civil engineer, in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 12mo. On separate letterheads. The recipient is not named and there is no salutation (though the letter is complete). Signed ‘Brassey’. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. Begins: ‘I have two maxims for [hourly?] use. / I do the little I can do and leave the rest to thee / What thou livest live well. The rest commit to Heaven / Nor should the last message of the greatest sailor since the world began ever be forgotten / England expects that every man this day will do his duty’.

[‘Now do you understand why authors leave the country?’: Beverley Nichols, novelist and poet.] Typed Letter Signed to ‘Mr. Bryon’, regarding an interview, and conclusion of Typed Letter Signed joking about heavy correspondence.

Author: 
Beverley Nichols (1898-1983), novelist and poet, author of more than sixty books, writer on gardens and gardening
Publication details: 
ONE (TLS to 'Mr. Bryon'): 6 June 1934; on letterhead of Six New Street, Westminster, S.W.1. TWO (conclusion of TLS): without date or place.
£56.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. The first letter, and probably the second, were written around the time when his ‘Down the Garden Path’ (1932) and its two sequels had made Nichols wildly popular, eliciting several parodies. ONE (TLS to ‘Mr. Bryon’): 1p, 12mo. Discoloration along top part of outer edge, otherwise in good condition. Folded once. Good clear signature ‘Beverley Nichols’. He thanks him for sending the interview. ‘I think it is admirably written, and expresses my views very clearly.’ TWO (conclusion of TLS): 1p, 12mo. Twenty-nine lines of text. In good condition, lightly aged.

[Donald Maxwell, painter and author.] Autograph Letter Signed to ‘Gordon’, poking fun at the staff of the ceramic manufacturers Royal Doulton.

Author: 
Donald Maxwell (1877-1936), English topgraphical painter and author [Royal Doulton, ceramic manufacturers, Lambeth, London, and Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent
Publication details: 
17 March 1934; on letterhead of East Farleigh House, near Maidstone [Kent].
£50.00

2pp, 16mo. Thirty lines of text. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. Addressed to ‘My dear Gordon’ and signed ‘love to you all / D.’ The letter concerns the noted ceramic manufacturers Royal Doulton, whose headquarters were at Lambeth in London. Begins: ‘My dear Gordon, / I looked in at Doultons on Tuesday morning on my way down to Corfe Castle & saw “the living skeleton” & Mr Wackrill. He told me that you had been there & taken a tile with you. Which one did you choose?

[Sir John Betjeman, poet laureate.] Typed Letter Signed from Elizabeth Moore (‘Dorinda’), ‘Secretary to Sir John’, telling Paul Furness that he cannot help in his 'researches into pubs with connections with the Socialist movement’ due to ill health.

Author: 
[Sir John Betjeman (1906-1984), poet laureate] Elizabeth Moore (‘Dorinda’), ‘Secretary to Sir John’
Publication details: 
15 February 1982. 29 Radnor Walk, London, SW3.
£25.00

Betjeman’s daughter Candida Lycett Green, in her edition of her father’s later letters, refers to Moore as the his ‘gentle secretary’, ‘whom he always called “Dorinda,” and who lived on the other side of the street’. She also states that after his stroke in 1981, the poet could no longer sign his name, and dictated letters to Moore. 1p, foolscap 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged and creased. Folded once for postage. On his letterhead (‘Sir John Betjeman’ at top left, and address at top right) printed in brown ink on cream paper. Addressed to ‘Mr. Furness’.

[Sir Landon Ronald, conductor and composer, Principal of the Guildhall School of Music, London.] Typed Letter Signed to W. J. Phillips ('My dear old Phil '), lamenting his absence on a 'great night, and one I shall never forget'.

Author: 
Sir Landon Ronald (1872-1938), conductor and composer, Principal of the Guildhall School of Music, London
Publication details: 
12 November 1935. On letterhead of the Guildhall School of Music, John Carpenter Street, Victoria Embankment, EC4 [London].
£45.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p, 4to. In fair condition, lightly aged and creased, with one short closed tear to an edge. Folded twice for postage. The salutation (‘My dear old “Phil,” ’) and the signature ‘Landon Ronald’ are in autograph, the rest typed. The recipient is ‘Dr. W. J. Phillips, / “Kelvinside,” / Malcolm Road, / Wimbledon, S.W.’ He sends a ‘thousand thanks’ for Phillips’s ‘delightful telegram’. ‘It was indeed good of you to think of us all down here. It was a great night, and one I shall never forget.

[Richard Westmacott, sculptor, Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy.] Autograph Letter Signed to the gardener Edward William Cooke, insisting on paying for flowers, and reporting that his 'poor mangy-looking wall is now pretty well covered'.

Author: 
Richard Westmacott (1799-1872), sculptor and Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy, son of Sir Richard Westmacott (1799-1872) [Edward William Cooke (1811-1880), marine artist and gardener]
Publication details: 
'W. / 1 K[ensington]. G[ate]. [Hyde Park, London] / Thursday'. No date.
£45.00

See his entry, and those of his father and Cooke, in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 16mo. In fair condition, lightly aged, with dab or red wax to one corner, and part of another corner torn away, presumably in breaking open the seal. Folded diagonally for postage. Addressed to 'My dear Mr Cooke' (the recipient's identity is beyond doubt) and signed 'Richd Westmacott'.

[Sir John Taylor Coleridge, judge and editor of the Quarterly Review.] Autograph Letter Signed to Sir John Wither Awdry, asking for clarification. On reverse of part of letter from the Lord Chancellor Lord Cranworth.

Author: 
Sir John Taylor Coleridge (1790-1876), judge and editor of the Quarterly Review [Robert Monsey Rolfe, Lord Cranworth (1790-1868), twice Lord Chancellor; Sir John Wither Awdry (1795-1878), judge]
Publication details: 
'April. 19. 1855 / P[rivy]. C[ouncil].'
£56.00

Coleridge was the nephew of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. See his entry, and that of Cranworth, in the Oxford DNB. The letter relates to Palmerston’s first ministry. 1p, 16mo (cut down to a 12 x 10 cm piece of wove paper). In fair condition, lightly aged and discoloured, with traces of glue from mount adhering to one edge of blank reverse. Signing himself ‘J. T C’, Coleridge writes: ‘My dear Awdry / I have been with the Chancellor in consequence of the above - & promised to send him a minute in writing - where we have had trouble. Can you help me with your recollection. / In haste.

[Richard Westmacott, sculptor, Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy.] Autograph Letter Signed to the wife of ‘Mr B.’, congratulating the couple on their wedding anniversary, and looking forward to his own marriage.

Author: 
Richard Westmacott (1799-1872), sculptor and Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy, son of Sir Richard Westmacott (1799-1872)
Publication details: 
‘Wednesday / Aug. 8. 1838’. No place.
£45.00

See his entry, and that of his father, in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged, with neatly-trimmed remnants of a windowpane mount adhering to the edges of the leaf. Folded twice for postage. Addressed to ‘My dear Madam’ and signed ‘R. W:’, followed by odd flourish.

[Lady Diana Cooper, English society beauty, actress and memoirist.] Autograph Signature on publicity photograph of her dressed as a nun, from the play 'The Miracle'.

Author: 
Lady Diana Cooper [née Lady Diana Olivia Winifred Maud Manners, later, as wife of Duff Cooper, Viscountess Norwich] (1892-1986), English society beauty, actress and memoirist
Diana
Publication details: 
1932. No place.
£45.00
Diana

See her entry in the Oxford DNB, which describes how she accepted Max Reinhardt's offer ‘to play the Madonna in a mime play, The Miracle. This was first staged in the USA from November 1923 to the following May, and again for the following three autumns and winters. It toured Europe in 1927, and London and the provinces in 1932; the last performance was in January 1933.

[Hartley Power, American stage and screen actor who settled in England.] Signed publicity photograph of him with trilby and pipe in mouth.

Author: 
Hartley Power (1894-1966), American stage and screen actor who settled in England
Publication details: 
No date (1930s). No place.
£35.00

Power made his Broadway debut in 1922. The film role for which he is perhaps best remembered is as Gregory Peck's boss in 'Roman Holiday' (1953). A 15 x 12 cm black and white image, printed on 17 x 14 cm matt card. In good condition, lightly aged. A head and shoulders shot of a pensive Power, pipe in mouth, trilby on head, in pin stripe suit jacket with white shirt and tie. At top right, against the plain background, in green ink, Power has written: ‘Best Wishes / Hartley Power.’

[Stewart Macpherson, musicologist and Dean of the Faculty of Music, University of London.] Autograph Letter Signed, requesting the revise of his 'biography for Modern Makers of Music' from publishers T. Seely, Clarke & Co.

Author: 
Stewart Macpherson [Charles Stewart Macpherson] (1865-1941), Anglo-Scottish musicologist, Dean of the Faculty of Music in the University of London
Publication details: 
12 September 1908. On letterhead of 23 Chepstow Villas, Bayswater, W. [London]
£50.00

See his entry in Grove’s, and Percy A. Scholes’s obituary in the Musical Times, June 1941. 2pp, 12mo. Addressed to ‘Messrs. T. Seeley Clark & Co:’ and signed ‘Stewart Macpherson’. On bifolium of grey paper. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once. They have led him to understand that he would have a revised proof of his ‘biography for Modern Makers of Music’ in time for the publication of the work in the autumn would be published that autumn, and is writing to remind them that he has ‘not yet received the revise’.

[Vernon Watkins, Welsh poet, friend of Dylan Thomas.] Autograph Signature to his printed poem ‘Poet and Goldsmith’.

Author: 
Vernon Watkins (1906-1967), Welsh poet, friend of Dylan Thomas
Publication details: 
No date or place. Offprint from ‘The London Magazine’, July 1954.
£35.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. The poem, one of Watkins’ best, is printed under the heading ‘VERNON WATKINS | Poet and Goldsmith’ on both sides of a 12mo leaf, paginated 13-14. In fair condition, lightly aged and creased. On the lower part of the second page is a reproduction of an attractive pen drawing of Richmond Bridge by Eleanor Poore. After the end of the poem and above the illustration is Watkins’ assured signature, good and clear: ‘Vernon Watkins’.

[Lord Halifax [Charles Lindley Wood, 2nd Viscount Halifax], ecumenist.] Autograph Letter Signed to the editor of the Church Review, regarding a new chapel for Edward King, Bishop of Lincoln, paid for by Halifax’s English Church Union.

Author: 
Lord Halifax [Charles Lindley Wood (1839-1934), 2nd Viscount Halifax], Anglo-Catholic ecumenist, for fifty years President of the English Church Union [Edward King (1829-1910), Bishop of Lincoln]
Publication details: 
‘88 Eaton Sqr [London] / Jany 3 / 1888.’
£56.00

See his entry, and that of Bishop King, in the Oxford DNB. For the context of the present item - a chapel ‘built by an ingenious use of a portion of the Old Palace ruins’ - see Randolph and Townroe, ‘The Mind and Work of Bishop King’ (1918), chapter 6: ‘The entire furnishing and decoration of the chapel was undertaken by members of the English Church Union, in response to an appeal made by the President of the Society. The consecration took place in 1888.’ (The Bishop’s letter of thanks to Lord Halifax is quoted.) 2pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged and worn. Folded twice.

[John Goss, Communist baritone.] Autograph Signature on part of printed page from programme.

Author: 
John Goss (1894-1953), Communist baritone singer associated with Peter Warlock and Frederick Delius
Publication details: 
No date or place.
£23.00

See his entry in Grove’s. A good large firm signature, 'John Goss'. On irregularly-shaped piece of laid paper cut from a printed programme, a 9.5 x 8 cm rectangle with one large triangle cut from a corner. Written over part of the words to the song 'I am a brisk and sprightly lad'. The printing on the back headed ' Once I loved a maiden fair Anon., 1600 / I am a brisk and sprightly lad Anon., 1750 / MR. JOHN GOSS.'

[Two twentieth-century English women novelists: Joanna Trollope to Margaret Forster.] Autograph Card Signed praising Forster's book ‘The Lady’s Maid’ and her garden.

Author: 
Joanna Trollope (b. 1943), highly-successful English romantic novelist [Margaret Forster (1938-2016), novelist and biographer]
Publication details: 
‘Coln St Aldwyne / Gloucs / 10 : x : 90’ [10 October 1990]
£56.00

See Forster’s entry in the Oxford DNB. The postcard carries on one side a photograph of a ‘famous entrance hall’, part of the series ‘Simon McBride’s England’. In fair condition, a little browned and worn, with small pin hole at head. Addressed to ‘Miss Margaret Forster / 11 Boscastle Road / LONDON NW5 1EE’. Begins: ‘How nice you are to write about the C4 review of “Lady’s Maid”. She was ‘so pleased’ to see Trollope’s novel ‘The Lady’s Maid’ ‘sitting deservedly in the top ten for so many weeks - roll on the paperback!’ Concludes: ‘And I love the look of your garden. / Joanna T.’

[Liverpool concerts for ‘Spain Relief’, 1939: John Goss, Communist baritone.] Two Typed Letters Signed to ‘Mr. Cameron’ and one Typed Card Signed to ‘Miss Cameron’, on behalf of the Musician’s Group of the Left Book Club.

Author: 
John Goss (1894-1953), Communist baritone associated with Peter Warlock and Frederick Delius [Spanish Civil War; Left Book Club; Liverpool]
Publication details: 
The letters to ‘Mr. Cameron’ dated 21 December 1938 and 9 January 1939; both from 35a Woburn Square, WC1 [London]. The card undated [early 1939], with London postmark.
£120.00

See his entry in Grove’s. Each with his firm signature 'John Goss'. The two letters in fair condition, on aged and creased paper, folded for postage, the first of the two with a short closed tear to one edge. The card in good condition, lightly aged. ONE: TLS to ‘Mr. Cameron’, 21 December 1938. 1p, 4to. Cameron’s letter ‘to the convener of the Musician’s Group of the Left Book Club’ has been passed to him.

[Bertram Dobell, London bookseller, poet and literary scholar.] Signature and five-line postscript cut from Autograph Letter Signed, deprecating his poetry booklet 'Rosemary and Pansies'.

Author: 
Bertram Dobell (1842-1914), London bookseller, poet and literary scholar
Publication details: 
Without date or place. [1901.]
£45.00

See his entry by his grandson Anthony Rota in the Oxford DNB. On one side of a piece of paper cut from the end of a letter. Refers to the first privately-printed collection of Dobell's poetry, 'Rosemary and Pansies' (1901). Reads: ‘Yours faithfully / Bertram Dobell. / I have printed only 75 copies of my booklet, so that it may have at least the recommendation of being scarce - the only one, I am afraid, that it can claim.’

[The Abdication Crisis, 1936: Sir Osbert Sitwell.] Mimeographed copy, marked ‘Private’, of the unexpurgated version of the satirical poem ‘RAT WEEK. / by Osbert Sitwell’, the cause of a legal action with ‘Cavalcade’.

Author: 
The Abdication Crisis, 1936: Sir Osbert Sitwell [Sir Francis Osbert Sacheverell Sitwell, 5th Baronet] (1892-1969) [King Edward VIII and Mrs Wallis Simpson; Abdication, 1936; Cavalcade]
Sitwell
Publication details: 
Undated, but circa 1936. On paper watermarked 'BELFAST BOND / MADE IN CANADA'.
£180.00
Sitwell

See Sitwell’s entry in the Oxford DNB. In his 1999 biography Philip Ziegler describes how the ‘doggerel polemic Rat Week’ ‘excoriated’ the supporters of the Edward VII and Mrs Simpson: ‘Osbert realised that this diatribe, if published, might land him in a flurry of libel actions, but he could not resist having a few copies made and distributed to his closer cronies; Mrs. Greville, Lady Aberconway, Lady Cholmondeley and Philip Frere among them.

[Roger McGough, one of the ‘Liverpool Poets’ and presenter of BBC Radio ‘Poetry Please’.] Autograph Letter Signed to Paul Furness giving information on the pubs and venues he was ‘associated with during those poetry-reading days’ in sixties Liverpool

Author: 
Roger McGough (born 1937), one of the celebrated ‘Liverpool Poets’ associated with the Beatles in the 1960s; presenter of the BBC Radio 4 programme ‘Poetry Please’ [Adrian Henri]
Publication details: 
‘307 Fulham Rd / LONDON SW10 / 19 April 83 [1983]’.
£80.00

1p, foolscap 8vo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded for postage. Addressed to ‘Dear Paul Furness’ and signed ‘Roger McGough’. On the subject of Furness’s ‘fascinating pub study’, he names ‘the ones I was associated with during those poetry-reading days’: ‘O’Connors Tavern in Hardman Street (Liverpool all), The Philharmonic (corner of Hope St. & Hardman Street), The Grapes, Pilgrim Street’. In addition there were ‘clubs which we took over on quiet nights i.e. Monday at Chauffeurs Club, Hope Street’.

[‘The English Mayakovsky’: Adrian Mitchell, radical poet.] Typed Letter Signed to [Paul] Furness, describing his youthful experiences in pubs, ‘with the Merseylads’ (‘Liverpool poets’), in London and Oxford, with Jeff Nuttall, David Mercer and others

Author: 
Adrian Mitchell (1932-2008), radical poet who made his name in the nineteen-sixties, described by Kenneth Tynan as ‘the British Mayakovsky’
Publication details: 
‘13 South Hill Park, London NW 3 March 31st 83’.
£50.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p, foolscap 8vo. Forty-three lines. In good condition, lightly aged and worn. Folded for postage. Signed in red ink ‘Adrian Mitchell’, and with red ink underlining and one manuscript addition. Addressed to ‘Mr Furness’ (One of a number of letters from British poets in response to enquiries from Paul Furness with regard to their pub memories.) Begins: ‘Pub I think of with the Merseylads is the Phil.

[Joseph Lancaster, Quaker educationalist.] Printed ephemera: Handbill titled ‘ROYAL BENEVOLENCE.’, appealing for subscription to ‘a Fund to enable Schools in the country, for TEN THOUSAND POOR CHILDREN’.

Author: 
Joseph Lancaster (1778-1838), pioneering Quaker educationalist who advocated the monitorial system
Lancaster
Publication details: 
‘Free School, Borough Road, Southwark. / 19th of 3d Month, 1806.’
£220.00
Lancaster

A scarce and fragile item: the only copy traced on WorldCat and Jisc is held by the Society Friends (Quakers). Lancaster’s entry in the Oxford DNB, which sums up his achievements: ‘his name was to survive in English educational history as one of the foremost pioneers of mass schooling and effective teacher training in the early industrial era’. The handbill is printed on one side of a 15 x 19.5 cm leaf of thin wove paper. A fragile survival: lightly aged and worn, with a small hole and closed tear, but text clear and entire.

[Stanley J. Weyman, popular English novelist of the ?cloak and dagger school?.] Autograph Letter Signed to 'Miss Barron' [i.e. Rosemary Barron]

Author: 
Stanley J. Weyman [Stanley John Weyman] (1855-1928), popular English Victorian and Edwardian novelist of historical romance and the 'cloak and dagger school'
Publication details: 
7 March 1926. On letterhead of Plas Llanrhydd, Ruthin, North Wales.
£50.00

Weyman was, as his entry in the Oxford DNB states, ?one of the most popular and skilled of the historical romance novelists of the cloak and dagger school?. Oscar Wilde recommended (in all seriousness) Weyman's novels as reading for convicts. 1p, 16mo. In fair condition, lightly creased and worn. Folded for postage. From the collection of Rosemary Barron, autograph collector. Reads: 'Dear Miss Barron / I am sorry that your letter has remained unanswered so long but I have been laid aside by illness.

[Sir Thomas Fairbairn, Manchester industrialist and patron of the Pre-Raphaelites.] Autograph Note Signed, inviting ?Yonge? to bring his rod and 'try the river'.

Author: 
Sir Thomas Fairbairn (1823-1891), industrialist with engineers William Fairbairn & Sons, and patron of the Pre-Raphaelites, leading figure in the foundation of the Manchester City Art Gallery
Publication details: 
?Saturday? [no date or place].
£50.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p., 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded once for postage. Reads: ?Dear Yonge / Will you bring your rod & try the river this morning / Yours always / Thomas Fairbairn / Saturday?.

[John Timbs, antiquary and author.] Autograph Letter Signed to 'Mr Hogg', complaining of poor health and asking him to write prescriptions for him and his 'poor friend Bates'.

Author: 
John Timbs (1801-1875), antiquary and author
Publication details: 
‘40, Bartholomew Villas, / Kentish Town, / Jan. 17 1874’.
£56.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with thin strip of mount adhering to one edge. Folded for postage.

[Gerald Massey, poet, spiritualist and Egyptologist.] Autograph Letter Signed to Alfred Miles, taking him to task for his selection of his poems for an anthology, and demanding 'a hand in the selection'.

Author: 
Gerald Massey (1828-1907), poet, spiritualist and discredited Egyptologist [Alfred Henry Miles (1848-1929)
Publication details: 
20 April [no year, but on paper watermarked 1887]; New Southgate.
£120.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded for postage. Addressed to 'Alfred Miles Esqre.' and with good bold signature 'Gerald Massey'. Begins: 'Dear Sir / You are quite at liberty to quote from my poems - but I shd. like to have a hand in the selection. / In a collection so large as you contemplate there ought to be nothing but one's best.' If he were to edit such a work he would 'make all living authors so choose their own poems. Sir Richard Grenville is the only one of those you mention that I shd.

[ A. E. W. Mason, English novelist, author of ‘The Four Feathers’.] Typed Note Signed to Rosemary Barron, responding to a request for an autograph.

Author: 
A. E. W. Mason [Alfred Edward Woodley Mason] (1865-1948), hugely-popular English novelist, playwright and screenwriter, author of ‘The Four Feathers’ and creator of Inspector Hanaud
Publication details: 
9 August 1927. On letterhead of New Grove, Petworth, Sussex.
£50.00

Mason was, according to E. V. Lucas, ‘famous in both hemispheres’. His entry in the Oxford DNB ends with this assessment: ‘His books were best-sellers for fifty years, and the films made from them, notably The Drum (1938), for which he wrote his own scenario, and The Four Feathers (1939), were among the most popular in their time.’ 1p, 12mo. In good condition, lightly aged. Folded twice for postage. The valediction is in Mason's autograph: 'Yours sincerely / A. E. W. Mason'.

[Roden Noel [Roden Berkeley Wriothesley Noel or Noël], poet and Cambridge Apostle.] The last page of an Autograph Letter Signed, bearing his signature and a long postscript regarding sad scenes in London.

Author: 
Roden Noel [Roden Berkeley Wriothesley Noel or Noël] (1834-1894), poet and Cambridge Apostle
Publication details: 
‘Kew Green. Kew. / Feb 1. 1869’.
£50.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 1p, 12mo. In fair condition, on aged paper, with strip of sunning, and evidence of mounting on reverse, which also bears contemporary pencil annotation: ‘Honble Roden Noel / Son of Earl of Gainsborough / A considerable writer & Poet / Author of “A little Child’s Monument” & other Poetry’. Folded twice. The signature is large and firm, but rest of his handwriting is appalling. The page carries the letter’s valediction, with date and address, and a seven-line postscript: ‘[...] Kind regards [...] How sad is the [...] London!

[Mr. Serjeant Ballantine [William Ballantine, Serjeant-at-Law], lawyer and author.] Substantial Autograph Letter Signed, praising 'a new family paper called The English Resident', with regard to 'English sojourners' in Boulogne-sur-Mer.

Author: 
Mr. Serjeant Ballantine [William Ballantine, Serjeant-at-Law] (1812-1887), lawyer and author ['The English Resident', journal; Boulogne-sur-Mer]
Serjeant Ballantine
Publication details: 
'Boulogne s/m June 18 1883'.
£250.00
Serjeant Ballantine

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 4to. On first leaf of bifolium. Forty-three lines of neat text. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn, with a few small closed tears. The author ('Sir') is unnamed, but is presumably the 'Editor' referred to in the text. Signed 'Wm Ballantine'. By recipient, at head of first page: 'Letter from Mr Sergeant [sic] Ballantine / United Club -'.

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