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[Lady Clementine Churchill and the Red Cross Aid to Russia Fund.] Facsimile of a signed autograph letter by the wife of Sir Winston Churchill, a circular to thank contributors to the fund.

Author: 
Lady Clementine Churchill (1885-1977), wife of Sir Winston Churchill; Red Cross Aid to Russia Fund
Publication details: 
Facsimile of letter dated November 1941 and on 10 Downing Street letterhead.
£50.00

According to her entry in the Oxford DNB: ' Also in 1941 she embarked upon what became the most substantial public work she ever undertook when she became chairman of the Red Cross Aid to Russia Fund. Of the £9,000,000 collected in Britain to help the USSR, ‘Mrs Churchill's Fund’, as it was popularly known, raised £6,700,000. In March–May 1945, at the invitation of the Russian Red Cross, she visited Russia to inspect many of the institutions equipped or otherwise helped by her fund.

[Eleanor Roosevelt: the wife of the President's wartime visit to Britain.] Post Office Telegram from Mrs Roosevelt, thanking Vice-Chancellor Sir David Ross for hospitality of Oxford University.

Author: 
Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), wife of 32nd President of United States of America, Franklin Delano Roosevelt [Sir David Ross (1877-1971), Provost of Oriel, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University]
Roosevelt
Publication details: 
Post Office Telegram sent from Manchester. With Oxford office stamp, 9 November 1942.
£120.00
Roosevelt

Towards the end of 1942, with America having been at war with the Axis powers for a year to Britain’s three, Eleanor Roosevelt accepted an invitation from Queen Elizabeth to travel to Britain in order to ‘study the British home front effort and visit US troops stationed there. [...] she spent almost a month inspecting factories, shipyards, hospitals, schools, bomb shelters, distribution centers, Red Cross clubs, evacuee centers and military installations in England, Scotland and Ireland’ (Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, Columbian College).

[Sir Thomas Wyse, British Ambassador to Greece and husband of Napoleon's niece Princess Letizia Bonaparte.] Autograph Signature to valediction of a letter.

Author: 
Sir Thomas Wyse (1791-1862), Anglo-Irish diplomat, British Ambassador to Greece, husband of Napoleon's niece Princess Letizia Bonaparte
Sir Thomas Wyse
Publication details: 
No place or date.
£450.00
Sir Thomas Wyse

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. On 10.5 x 5 cm strip of paper, with thin mourning border, cut from the end of a letter. In fair condition, lightly aged and creased, with thin strip of glue from mount to one edge, and thin strip of paper laid down on reverse, with manuscript note 'Sir Thomas Wyse, Minister to Greece'. Strong stylish signature to valediction reading: 'I beg you to believe me / My Dear Lord / Sincerely Yrs. / Thos. Wyse'. Fragment of letter on reverse: '[...] truly at his discretion to go on [...]'.

[Lord Bryce (James Bryce), Liberal politician, jurist and British Ambassador to United States.] Three Autograph Letters Signed to 'Ross' (the future Sir W. D. Ross), on East End philanthropy, Oxford, and the war.

Author: 
Lord Bryce [James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce] (1838-1922), Ulster-born Liberal politician, jurist, British Ambassador to United States [Sir William David Ross (1877-1981), Oxford Vice-Chancellor]
Publication details: 
1914, 1915 and 1917. The second on letterhead of Hindleap, Forest Row, Sussex; the third on embossed letterhead of the House of Lords.
£150.00

See the two men's entries in the Oxford DNB. The three items are in good condition, lightly aged and worn; the second is lightly spotted. Each is folded once. All three signed 'Bryce'. ONE: 13 February 1914. No place. 3pp, 12mo. On bifolium. Begins: 'My dear Ross / I should like [to] help in so good a cause, but cannot possibly venture to make any promise for a date so distant as Nov. next. It would be a tempting of Providence as we say in Scotland.' He is not even certain whether he will be in England then, 'and there is nothing one has more to avoid than the breaking of promises'.

[John Strongitharm, London commercial engraver. Engraver to the Prince of Wales.] Coloured Proof Engraving of the royal arms (lion and unicorn), beneath the words ‘LORD CHAMBERLAIN’S OFFICE’. With pencil instructions on the reverse.

Author: 
John Strongitharm (c.1758-c.1839), London commercial engraver, Engraver to the Prince of Wales [The Lord Chamberlain’s Office]
Strongitharm
Publication details: 
No date or place. [Early nineteenth century. John Strongitharm, 1 Waterloo Place, London.]
£320.00
Strongitharm

Strongitharm’s entry on the British Museum website is the main source of information about him. In 1841 ‘John Strongitharm’ is listed in the Royal Calendar among the ‘Queen’s Tradesmen’, ‘In the Department of the Lord Chamberlain’, as ‘Seal Engraver’. The present item is an well-executed and carefully hand-coloured steel engraving of the royal arms (lion and unicorn), topped by a banner with ‘LORD CHAMBERLAIN’S OFFICE’. Engraved in small letters beneath the image: ‘Strongitharm, Waterloo Place’. Printed on a somewhat-aged and lightly worn piece of thickish laid paper, 11.5 x 6.5.

[Sir John Barrow, Second Secretary to the Admiralty.] ‘Duplicate’ of Secretarial Letter, Signed by Barrow, to ‘The Senior Officer at Rio Janeiro’, on Rear Admiral Sir Michael Seymour’s discharge with disgrace of ‘Henry Wood, Seaman of the Blonde'.

Author: 
Sir John Barrow (1764-1848), geographer and author, Second Secretary to the Admiralty, 1804-1845 [Rear Admiral Sir Michael Seymour (1768-1834)
Barrow
Publication details: 
‘Admiralty [Whitehall, London] / 8th September 1834.’
£100.00
Barrow

See the entries for Barrow and Seymour in the Oxford DNB. On laid Whatman paper dated 1833. Having served for four years as Commissioner at Portsmouth, Seymour had sailed out to South America in 1833 as commander-in-chief, dying of ‘low fever’ at Rio de Janeiro two months before the writing of the present letter. 1p, foolscap 8vo. In good condition, folded twice. At top left: ‘Duplicate, / No 50.’ Initialed at bottom left: ‘J. P.’ Good firm and attractive signature ‘John Barrow’. Writing with regard to ‘the late Rear Admiral Sir Michael Seymour’s letter of the 16th.

Samuell's Guide: How to know Sydney. Illustrated. Maps of Sydney, the harbour, the suburbs. Fishing resorts, masonic, shooting information, carriage drives, telegraphic code, &c. &c.

Author: 
H. J. Samuell's Guide to Sydney, 1897.
Publication details: 
Printed by McCarron, Stewart & Co., for the Samuell Publishing Company, Sydney, N.S.W. [New South Wales], 1897.
£225.00

16mo (13.5 x 10.5 cm), 288 pp. In original black and red printed wraps, illustrated on front with illustrations relating to the city. Fold-out 'Map of Sydney' (26 x 38 cm) in black and grey, with advertisements on reverse. Lacking the fold-out map which should be present on a stub between pp 124 and 125. Good, a little aged with slight staining at foot of first leaf. In worn and stained wraps, becoming detached from book at front. Ownership inscription of 'U Reynell 1895' in pencil on front wrap. Advertisements throughout. Numerous photographic illustrations.

[Ernst Philipp Graf von Brunnow, longtime Russian Ambassador to the Court of St James [Great Britain].] Autograph Signature and valediction of letter in English.

Author: 
Ernst Philipp Graf von Brunnow (1797-1875), Baltic German diplomat who served in the Russian Empire, for thirty years (1840-1854, 1858-1874) Russian Ambassador to the Court of St James [Great Britain]
Brunnow
Publication details: 
Without date or place.
£56.00
Brunnow

A close, controlled hand, on a slip of paper 10 x 1 cm. See Image. In good condition, lightly aged with a little light red spotting. Reads: ?Believe me / faithfully yours / Brunnow?.

[Frank Norman.] Three Typed Letters Signed and one Autograph Card Signed to Philip Dosse of Hanson Books, complaining about his treatment over the reviews he has contributed to ‘Books and Bookmen’.

Author: 
Frank Norman [John Norman] (1930-1980), working-class writer on London low-life, best-known for the memoir Bang to Rights (1958) and musical Fings Ain't Wot They Used T'Be (1960) [Philip Dosse]
Publication details: 
All from 1975. The three letters from 5 Seaford Court, 222 Great Portland Street, W1 [London].
£220.00

Norman is puzzlingly absent from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The recipient Philip Dosse was proprietor of Hansom Books, publisher of a stable of seven arts magazines including Books and Bookmen and Plays and Players. See ‘Death of a Bookman’ by the novelist Sally Emerson (editor of ‘Books and Bookmen’ at the time of Dosse’s suicide), in Standpoint magazine, October 2018. The four items are in fair condition, lightly aged and worn. They are all signed ‘Frank Norman’, and the letters are each 1p, 4to. ONE: TLS, 17 February 1975.

[Sir Charles Stewart Scott, diplomat, British Ambassador to Russia.] 'Private & most Confidential' Autograph journal of ‘Charles: S: Scott’, largely written while an attaché in Paris (Franco-Austrian War, 1859), also in Dresden and Copenhage.

Author: 
Sir Charles Stewart Scott (1838-1924), diplomat, British Ambassador to Russia, 1898-1904 [Franco-Austrian War (Second Italian War of Independence), 1859; American Civil War; Princess Alexandra]
Publication details: 
The first three-quarters from Paris, 18 June to 16 November 1859. The last quarter from Dresden and Copenhagen, 1860 to 1863.
£2,500.00

The papers of Sir Charles Stewart Scott (an Ulsterman: see his entry in the Ulster Dictionary of Biography) are held by the British Library. The present journal, described by its writer as ‘Private & most Confidential’, covers the very start of his career, from Paris in 1859 to Copenhagen in 1863.

[Sir Edward Malet, British diplomat.] Autograph Letter Signed to ‘Mrs. Vaughan Williams’, explaining why he cannot accept her invitation, and sending tickets to ‘some tableaux vivants’ at the house of the Princesse Caraman-chimay.

Author: 
Sir Edward Malet [Sir Edward Baldwin Malet] (1837-1908), diplomat, successively Consul-General in Egypt, and British Ambassador to Belgium and Germany
Publication details: 
2 April 1884, on letterhead of the ‘Legation d’Angleterre’ (British Embassy in Brussels).
£56.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 3pp, 12mo. Bifolium. An area torn away at the head of the first leaf (with the loss of one word of text) has been skilfully repaired with archival paper; otherwise in good condition, lightly aged. He apologizes for being unable to ‘come to your at home tomorrow as I can not go to any parties till after the funeral of the Duke of Albany’. He asks her to ‘accept and make use of’ tickets ‘for some tableaux vivants which are to take place tomorrow night at the house of the Princesse de Caraman-chimay.

[Cyprus Emergency [Greek Cypriot War of Independence], 1955 to 1959.] Red card carrying ‘Restricted’ printed British Army ‘Instructions to individuals for opening fire in Cyprus. | Issued by Chief of Staff to H.E. the Governor.'

Author: 
Cyprus Emergency [Greek Cypriot War of Independence], 1955 to 1959 [British Army Counter-Insurgency; EOKA]
Publication details: 
‘CS/1060/A/Dec. 55.’ [December 1955; COSHEG, British Cyprus.]
£160.00

An interesting artefact, issued at the commencement of the conflict, and laying out the rules of engagement. The only copies traced are in the A. J. B. Walker collection in the Imperial War Museum, the National Army Museum and the University of Cyprus. In fair condition, lightly aged and worn. On 26 December 1955 the British Governor General of Cyprus declared a state of emergency, as a result of the EOKA insurgency which had begun with the 1 April Attacks. 4pp, 32mo, printed in black on a bifolium of red card.

[Norman Collins, author of ‘London Belongs to Me’.] Typed Letter Signed to Philip Dosse, publisher of ‘Books and Bookmen’, regarding a review he has written, and a party in his honour held by the English Centre of P.E.N.

Author: 
Norman Collins [Norman Richard Collins] (1907-1982), author of ‘London Belongs to Me’ and TV executive [Philip Dosse (1925-1980), publisher of ‘Books and Bookmen’]
Publication details: 
2 March 1977; on letterhead of ATV House, 17 Great Cumberland Place, London W1.
£56.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. The recipient Philip Dosse was proprietor of Hansom Books, publisher of a stable of seven arts magazines including Books and Bookmen and Plays and Players. See ‘Death of a Bookman’ by the novelist Sally Emerson (editor of ‘Books and Bookmen’ at the time of Dosse’s suicide), in Standpoint magazine, October 2018. The present item is 1p, 4to. Signed ‘Norman Collins’. In good condition, lightly aged. He is submitting a review of J. B. Priestley’s ‘Instead of the Trees’, in the hope that it is ‘the kind of thing that you had in mind’.

[Walter H. Page, American ambassador to the United Kingdom during the First World War.] Typed Note Signed to C. Reginald Grundy [editor of 'The Connoisseur'], regretting his inability to attend a meeting at the Mansion House.

Author: 
Walter H. Page [Walter Hines Page] (1855-1918), journalist and publisher, American abassador to United Kingdom during First World War [Cecil Reginald Grundy (1870-1944), editor of 'The Connoisseur']
Publication details: 
22 May 1917; London, on embossed letterhead of the Embassy of the United States of America.
£80.00

1p, 4to. Rather aged, with some wear and discoloration at head and foot, and minor traces of mount on reverse. Four folds. Signed ‘Walter H. Page’ and addressed to ‘C. Reginald Grundy, Esq., / 1, Duke Street, / S. W. 1.’ The note reads: ‘Dear Sir: / I wish it had been possible for me to attend the meeting at the Mansion House to-day to further the establishment of local war museums, but I regret to say that it was impossible. / Yours very truly, / Walter H. Page’.

[General Sir Edward Stanton, British Army officer and Ambassador to Bavaria.] Autograph Letter Signed to ‘Mr. Cochrane’, regarding ‘the Nile map’ and his son’s ‘explorations of the Bahr-el-zara’.

Author: 
General Sir Edward Stanton (1827-1907), British Army officer who served in the Crimean War, and diplomat who was British Ambassador to Bavaria [Col. Edward Alexander Stanton]
Publication details: 
8 December 1898; on letterhead of 19 Lansdowne Place, Cheltenham.
£70.00

2pp, 12mo. Bifolium. In good condition, lightly worn. Folded once. Addressed to ‘Dear Mr. Cochrane’ and signed ‘Edwd. Stanton’. He thanks him for ‘sending me the Nile map, which is certainly more complete than any I had, though it does not give us much more information as to the rivers South of [Faolooda?], than is to be found in The Times atlas’. He hopes that when his son ‘returns from his explorations of the Bahr-el-zara’, he ‘will be able to extend our knowledge of that part of the Nile Valley’.

[Society for Irish Church Missions to the Roman Catholics.] Printed promotional pamphlet, including ‘The West Galway Church Building Fund / Appeal from the Bishop of Tuam.’ [i.e. Thomas Span Plunket]

Author: 
Society for Irish Church Missions to the Roman Catholics, Anglican missionary society, founded 1849 [The West Galway Church Building Fund; Thomas Span Plunket, Bishop of Tuam; Rev. Alexander Dallas]
Publication details: 
[November, 1850.] For the Society for Irish Church Missions to the Roman Catholics [The West Galway Church Building Fund].
£320.00

A scarce item: the only copy on COPAC at Trinity College Dublin. (WorldCat records a German library holding). See the entry on the Society’s founder, Rev. Alexander Dallas, in the Oxford DNB. The organisation, which still operates, is a controversial one. It was founded to convert Irish Roman Catholics to Protestantism, and the attitude of those involved can be gauged by the fact that its members considered the Potato Famine a judgement on the Catholics and made relief conditional on conversion, and that the Bishop of Tuam evicted tenants for not sending their children to Protestant schools.

[Lord Bryce (James Bryce), Liberal politician, jurist and Ambassador to United States; Ist WW.] Autograph Letter Signed to ‘Mr. Marshall’, stating that it is not yet time for ‘negotiating the peace’ [with Germany].

Author: 
Lord Bryce [James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce] (1838-1922), Ulster-born Liberal politician, jurist, British Ambassador to United States
Publication details: 
22 November 1916.
£65.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. 2pp, 12mo. The letter was torn in two vertically, and has been taped back together, with the tape going over the downstroke of the ‘y’ in Bryce’s signature. It also has a spike hole. Otherwise in fair condition. Addressed to ‘Dear Mr. Marshall’ and signed ‘Bryce’. Marshall’s telegram has followed him into the country, ‘& it is now too late to express the opinion you ask for’, although that would in any case ‘be really superflous because I said upon Tuesday the 14th. Novr.

[Oxford degrees to J. M. Barrie, Ethel Smyth, Sir Henry Newbolt, Lord Dawson of Penn.] Material printed by the Clarendon Press relating to ‘Convocation / Encaenia, June 23, 1926 / The Right Hon. George, Viscount Cave, Chancellor / Presiding’.

Author: 
[Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press; John Johnson, Printer to the University; J. M. Barrie; Ethel Smyth; Sir Henry Newbolt; Lord Dawson of Penn]
Publication details: 
The University of Oxford, 1926. Oxford: John Johnson / Printer to the University.
£120.00

Material which, by its very nature, is extremely uncommon. Five items, three of them beautifully printed with the Fell Types. From the papers of King George V’s doctor Lord Dawson of Penn (see his entry in the Oxford DNB). Among those to whom degrees are conferred (all of whom receive the customary praise in florid Latin) are J. M. Barrie, Sir Henry Newbold, Dame Ethel Smity, Sir Austen Chamberlain and the Speaker of the Commons John Henry Whitley. The first three are printed with the Fell Types, and the first two and the fifth carry Johnson’s slug.

[Oxford degrees to J. M. Barrie, Ethel Smyth, Sir Henry Newbolt, Lord Dawson of Penn.] Material printed by the Clarendon Press relating to ‘Convocation / Encaenia, June 23, 1926 / The Right Hon. George, Viscount Cave, Chancellor / Presiding’.

Author: 
[Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press; John Johnson, Printer to the University; J. M. Barrie; Ethel Smyth; Sir Henry Newbolt; Lord Dawson of Penn]
Publication details: 
The University of Oxford, 1926. Oxford: John Johnson / Printer to the University.
£100.00

Material which, by its very nature, is extremely uncommon. Three items, two of which are beautifully printed with the Fell Types. Duplicates from the papers of King George V’s doctor Lord Dawson of Penn (see his entry in the Oxford DNB). Among those to whom degrees are conferred (all of whom receive the customary praise in florid Latin) are J. M. Barrie, Sir Henry Newbold, Dame Ethel Smythe, Sir Austen Chamberlain and the Speaker of the Commons John Henry Whitley. The first three are printed with the Fell Types, and the first two and the fifth carry Johnson’s slug.

[Isobel Cripps [Lady Cripps], overseas aid organizer.] Two duplicated Second World War handbills, in the form of facsimiles of Autograph Letters Signed, regarding the British United Aid to China Fund.

Author: 
Isobel Cripps [Lady Cripps; née Swithinbank] (1891-1979), overseas aid organizer, wife of Labour politician Sir Stafford Cripps [British United Aid to China Fund]
Publication details: 
Neither printed handbill dated, but both dating from the Second World War. Both on London letterheads: one for 13 Regent Street, SW1; the other for 57 New Bond Street, W1.
£50.00

Two scarce pieces of wartime ephemera. See her entry, and that of her husband, in the Oxford DNB. The former explains how, during the Second World War, Lady Cripps was president of the British United Aid to China Fund, and that in 1946 ‘she undertook an extensive and arduous tour of China’, being entertained by both Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong. The journey was ‘one of 30,000 miles which included travel by air, sea, road, rail, and truck. Most of the great cities of China were visited and to see co-operative work in rural areas the Gansu Desert was crossed by lorry.

[Adlai Stevenson, American Democratic politician.] Producer Hugh Burnett's copy of typescript of Stevenson’s interview with John Freeman in the BBC TV series 'Face to Face', marked up for publication.

Author: 
Adlai Stevenson [Adlai Ewing Stevenson II] (1900-1965), American Democratic nominee for President of the United States [John Freeman, interviewer on BBC programme ‘Face to Face’; Hugh Burnett]
Publication details: 
Undated, but BBC interview broadcast on 22 July 1959, and this item prepared for publication in 1964.
£80.00

The present item is producer Hugh Burnett's own copy, from his papers, of the transcript of Stevenson's interview with Freeman, broadcast in the groundbreaking BBC television series 'Face to Face' on 22 July 1959. The single-spaced typed transcript was produced for inclusion in Burnett's book 'Face to Face / Edited and introduced by Hugh Burnett' (London: Jonathan Cape, 1964), and is marked up with printing instructions in pencil and red ink, with a few proof corrections in pencil and green ink. 2pp, foolscap 8vo, on two leaves.

[‘The rudest man in Britain’ reduced to tears: Gilbert Harding, radio and television personality.] Producer Hugh Burnett's corrected proof of typescript of Harding’s celebrated interview with John Freeman in the BBC TV series 'Face to Face'.

Author: 
Gilbert Harding [Gilbert Charles Harding] (1907-1960), irascible British radio and television personality [John Freeman, interviewer on BBC programme ‘Face to Face’; Hugh Burnett]
Publication details: 
Undated, but BBC interview broadcast on 18 September 1960, and this item prepared for publication in 1964.
£75.00

The present item is producer Hugh Burnett's own copy, from his papers, of the transcript of John Freeman's interview with Harding, broadcast in the groundbreaking BBC television series 'Face to Face' on 18 September 1960, a few weeks before Harding’s death on 16 November 1960. Harding’s entry in the Oxford DNB states that, ‘in radio programmes such as The Brains Trust and Twenty Questions, and on television in What's my Line?, Harding became a great popular figure, especially of television in which he was probably the best-known performer in the country.

[Lord Thomson of Fleet, Fleet Street press baron.] Producer Hugh Burnett's copy of typescript of Thomson’s interview with John Freeman in the BBC TV series 'Face to Face', marked up for publication.

Author: 
Lord Thomson of Fleet [Roy Herbert Thomson, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet] (1894-1976), Canadian-born British newspaper proprietor, one of the Fleet Street press barons [Hugh Burnett; BBC; John Freeman]
Publication details: 
Undated, but BBC interview broadcast on 4 February 1962, and this item prepared for publication in 1964.
£50.00

The present item is producer Hugh Burnett's own copy, from his papers, of the transcript of John Freeman's interview with Thomson, broadcast in the groundbreaking BBC series 'Face to Face' on 4 February 1962. This single-spaced typed transcript was produced for inclusion in Burnett's book 'Face to Face / Edited and introduced by Hugh Burnett' (London: Jonathan Cape, 1964), and is marked up with printing instructions in pencil and red ink, with a few proof corrections in green ink. 1p, foolscap 8vo. In good condition, lightly aged. Emphasizing Thomson’s unthreatening ordinariness.

[General Sir Andrew Francis Barnard, army officer and courtier.] Autograph Letter Signed (‘A F Barnard’) to ‘Augustus’, providing information regarding pictures [in the royal collection], and ‘the Clue to their History’.

Author: 
General Sir Andrew Francis Barnard (1773-1855), distinguished Anglo-Irish officer in the British Army, decorated for his services during the Napoleonic Wars, and Equerry to King George IV
Publication details: 
18 December 1842; Canford [i.e. Canford House, Dorsetshire].
£60.00

See his entry in the Oxford DNB. From 1821 to the end of his life Barnard served as a courtier, notably as Equerry to King George IV, and it would appear that the present item is written in response to an enquiry made to the recipient of the letter regarding paintings in the royal collection. He writes from Camford House, where Queen Adelaide, widow of William IV, had taken up residence. 4pp, 12mo. On bifolium with thin mourning border. In fair condition, on aged paper. Folded twice.

[Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquis of Anglesey, soldier and courtier.] Autograph Letter Signed (‘Anglesey’), thanking A. C. Cox for offering ‘the Commissions in the name of the Marquess of Anglesey’.

Author: 
Marquis of Anglesey [Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquis of Anglesey (1885-1947)], Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, soldier with Royal Horse Guards, courtier and landowner, patron of Rex Whistle
Publication details: 
26 January 1937; on letterhead of Plas Newydd, Llanfairpwll, Isle of Anglesey, with stamp ‘GUARDS 2 / RECEIVED’.
£38.00

2pp, 12mo. In good condition, folded once. Headed by him ‘Guards & Cavalry’. He is obliged to Cox for his ‘courtesy in offering me the Commissions in the name of the Marquess of Anglesey’, and will be ‘very grateful for them and they will be with all the family papers of which there are a great many & well cared for & catalogued’.

[Augustus John, OM RA, celebrated Welsh painter.] Producer Hugh Burnett’s copy of the typed transcript of John’s BBC TV interview with John Freeman in the series ‘Face to Face’, with proof and typographical marks for publication.

Author: 
Augustus John [Augustus Edwin John] (1878-1961), OM RA, celebrated Welsh painter [John Freeman (1915-2014), Labour MP and interviewer on 'Face to Face'; Hugh Burnett (1924-2011), BBC TV producer]
Publication details: 
Without date or place, but BBC TV interview on 15 May 1960; and this transcript produced for inclusion in version published in London in 1964.
£220.00

The present item is the producer Hugh Burnett's own copy, from his papers, of the transcript of John Freeman's interview with John, broadcast in the groundbreaking BBC series 'Face to Face' on 15 May 1960. This single-spaced typed transcript was produced for inclusion in Burnett's book 'Face to Face / Edited and introduced by Hugh Burnett' (London: Jonathan Cape, 1964), and is marked up with printing instructions in pencil and red ink, with a few proof corrections in green ink. 3pp, foolscap 8vo, on three leaves stapled together.

[Rex Warner] Autograph Note Signed Rex Warner to a Mr. Ackroyd in response to congratulations on his Views of Attica just published.

Author: 
Rex Warner (1905 – 1986), classicist, writer, and translator.
Publication details: 
The Manor, Little Wittenham, Nr Abingdon, 24 Nov. 1950.
£56.00

One page, cr. 8vo, fold mark, small closed tear on fold, good condition. Very many thanks for writing to me about 'Views of Attica. It gives me great pleasure to know that people have enjoyed what one has enjoyed oneself. And you can imagine how difficult it is to describe [?] at all adequately. | I wish I'd known the country before this war.

[ Bayard Taylor, Poet ] Autograph Note Signed Bayard Taylor to an unnamed correspondent about My subject [...]

Author: 
Bayard Taylor (1825–1878), American poet, literary critic, translator, travel author, and diplomat.
Publication details: 
Kennett Square, Peoria, 20 Oct. 186[4?].
£80.00

Piece of paper from lined exercise book, 11 x 13cm, good condition. Text: My subject will be 'Ourselves and Our Relations' [all underlined]. OURSELVES AND OUR RELATIONS.; Lecture by Mr.

[ Hesba Stretton; NSPCC ] Autograph Letter Signed Hesba Stretton to an unnamed lady about the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, organising its foundation on 11 July 1884.

Author: 
Hesba Stretton [ Pen name of Sarah Smith (1832–1911), writer of children's books.]
Publication details: 
7 Lansdowne Road, W. [London], 1 July 1884.
£180.00

One page, 12mo, neat hand, laid down on slightly larger paper, good condition. The ladies of the Children's Safety Committee gave me permission last Thursday to send to each member of the society ten invitation cards for the meeting of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, in the hope that they would kindly give them to such of their friends as take a real interest in the welfare of Children. May I suggest that you will either write your name on each card or enclose your own card, to secure the invitation from being passed over unheeded.

[Vaughan Nash, writing as Private Secretary to Prime Minister H. H. Asquith.] Autograph Letter Signed ('Vaughan Nash') to 'Sir William', conveying the prime minister's regret at a misunderstanding over a royal commission.

Author: 
Vaughan Nash (1861-1932), Private Secretary to Prime Minister H. H. Asquith, economist, journalist, husband of Rosalind Nash, correspondent of Florence Nightingale
Publication details: 
1 March 1909. 10 Downing Street, Whitehall, SW [London].
£50.00

1p, 12mo. On aged paper, with closed tear repaired on reverse with brown paper. Folded twice. Addressed to 'Dear Sir William'. The prime minister (Asquith) has asked him to say that he is 'quite at a loss to understand how he came to be so misinformed as to the progress of the negotiations connected with the appointment of the Royal Commission'. All the prime minister can do is 'express his regret at the misunderstanding'.

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